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Thread: smoker fuel??

  1. #21
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    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Ah, a subject the Old Drone wrote about.

    http://beesource.com/pov/andy/andy7.htm
    Regards, Barry

  2. #22
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    Feb 2008
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    Auger Hole, MN
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    untreated sisal baler twine

    burns cool and very long burn time. do not use the green treated variety

  3. #23
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    Feb 2008
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    Sacramento Ca
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    A mixture of pine needles and hamster bedding.

  4. #24
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    Jan 2009
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    Dixion, CA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    You are using toxic smoke. Walnut leaves, bark, and wood contains Juglone. It is a herbicide that was once used by some native tribes to kill fish. It also is an issue for Sawyers who breath walnut sawdust when milling logs. I don't know how it holds up to burning, but I would not be burning it in my smoker...
    Good point there! Also someone mentioned Sumac. Sumac is also toxic.



    Brian Camp

  5. #25
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    More than the choice of smoker fuel, the use of
    a propane torch to light the smoker has made life
    a lot easier for me. Especially the ones with the
    igniter built in.

  6. #26
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    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by chillard willard View Post
    been more than enough times I've been doubled over a hive with a coughing and hacking fit from that smoke.
    You guys smoking that grass aught to listen to him. It's bad enough that your coughing and getting dizzy, but getting the munchies will keep you from getting anything done.

    Me, I don't use no smoke.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  7. #27
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    May 2008
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    Concord, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by J'smob View Post
    A mixture of pine needles and hamster bedding.
    If you're hamster bedding is cedar it might be an irritant. I know it is for many animals, not sure of smoke.
    Dan

  8. #28
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    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hardin,Texas,USA
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    10

    Thumbs Up

    Old blue Jeans cut in 1''X8'' strips and tied in a loose double knot,Pine needles.

  9. #29
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Mount Joy, PA, USA
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    The paper egg flates work great. To last longer you can make some wet and crunch them into a ball that will fit into your smoker. Than let them dry for a few weeks. Those balls of egg flat will burn for quite a while.
    Anyway...I like them...Jim

  10. #30
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    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
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    Pine Straw.......

  11. #31
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    Jan 2009
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    Weston, ME
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    Cedar is used to smoke meats so is walnut and sumac. I would imagine they are fine for the bees if we eat meat smoked with them (which would result in a much higher exposure). I doubt the person meant poison sumac which is highly toxic.
    Juglone is used for coloring agents in foods and cosmetics.


    Mike

  12. #32
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    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lancaster CA
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    410

    Default Cow chips

    You guys must not work out on the range. Dried cow chips work great and are always around.

  13. #33
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    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeJ View Post
    Cedar is used to smoke meats so is walnut and sumac. I would imagine they are fine for the bees if we eat meat smoked with them (which would result in a much higher exposure). I doubt the person meant poison sumac which is highly toxic.
    Juglone is used for coloring agents in foods and cosmetics.


    Mike
    ..All smoke is toxic, it all contains cyanide... that does not impart to the meats that are smoked with it. Like I said before I don't know if Juglone holds up to burning; However as a Sawyer I have first hand experience on what it will do to a person who breaths it.

    I have also salvaged a walnut tree out of a pond that it blew into....the Juglone killed all the fish and two years later they still have been unable to restock the pond.

    It is one thing I would not use on my bees, but have at it if you like.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  14. #34
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    Mar 2007
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    Sweden
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    Default birch bracket + satsuma

    Chopped and dried birch bracket glows very slowly and steady so the smoker is always ready.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piptoporus_betulinus : "Dried specimens have also been used as tinder, and this fungus was carried by "Ötzi the Iceman" – the 5,000 year old mummy found in the Tyrol."

    Dried satsuma pielings add nice smell, they are rich in oils. I eat loads of these winter time.

  15. #35
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    Jan 2009
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    Brewster, NY USA
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    I end up with a lot of shavings and small scraps when making hives (pine). I use the shavings to start the scrap blocks, which smolder for quite a while, then I top it off with green grass or weeds. Seems to work.
    Whatever you believe you can or cannot do, you're right. - RusticElementBees.com

  16. #36
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    Feb 2008
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    Sacramento Ca
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ6AR View Post
    If you're hamster bedding is cedar it might be an irritant. I know it is for many animals, not sure of smoke.
    I only use pine shavings. The shavings with the needles always makes a very cool white smoke and the pine seems to have more of a calming effect on them. I never use other woods or stuff because the smoke seems to be much harsher.

  17. #37
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    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Burlap

  18. #38
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    Apr 2003
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    Greenville, TX, USA
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    Rotenone is the chemical in walnut that kills fish. I would be very surprised if you could get enough out of a tree trunk to kill anything. The indians used to use the green hulls from the walnuts. They beat it to a pulp to extract the juice and used it to collect fish. It breaks down in sunlight and I doubt it survives the heat of a smoker.

  19. #39
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    Sep 2007
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    Fayetteville, AR, USA
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  20. #40
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    Jul 2008
    Location
    Belfield, North Dakota, USA
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    Default corn cob

    We just had a corn stove put in this winter. I get corn from the feed lot and sift it. As a result, I collect a lot of cob and stalk fragments. I am considering trying them as a fuel. Does anybody know any reason that I shouldn't?

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