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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Question Gas Line Treatment

    Up here in the tundra, gas stations sell "Heat" gas
    line anti-freeze by the cases. It binds to water and
    rids it from your system.

    My question???

    Gasoline is already 10% ethanol. A tank of 20 gallons
    already has 2 gallons of alcohol in it. So what sense does
    it make to add 8 ounces of isopropal alcohol (Heat)

    Is someone making a load of money on something that
    is no longer needed???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
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    2,172

    Default

    Ethanol pulls moister from the air into the gas. That's why low ethanol is used around lakes where boats are fueled. It wreaks havoc in marine engines which are very precisely tuned for top performance.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bizzybee View Post
    Ethanol pulls moister from the air into the gas. That's why low ethanol is used around lakes where boats are fueled. It wreaks havoc in marine engines which are very precisely tuned for top performance.
    Doesn't iso do the same???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Crawfordville, FL
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    2,569

    Default

    ethanol is hygroscopic, which means it attracts water molecules from the environment.

    Isopropyl alcohol isn't really hygroscopic (at least according to my Merck Index 13th edition). It depresses the freezing point of water, but doesn't draw it out of the air, making it a superior de-icing agent.
    The bees know!
    AKA Wormtounge

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    In addition, isopropyl alcohol aids the situation by solubilizing the water into the fuel, which helps so that fuel line icing isn't as much of a problem.

    MM

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default Put a tiger in your tank.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    Up here...gas stations sell "Heat" gas line anti-freeze by the cases. It binds to water and rids it from your system....My question???
    Gasoline is already 10% ethanol. A tank of 20 gallons already has 2 gallons of alcohol in it. So what sense does it make to add 8 ounces of isopropyl alcohol (Heat) Is someone making a load of money on something that
    is no longer needed???
    Opinions are like navels, everybody has one. Bottling "Pure" alcohol is problematic. About the best you can achieve in the real world is 90%-95% alcohol the rest being water that the alcohol has "attracted" from the environment. Yep, alcohol will attract water as will sugar or honey but I don't see anyone selling cane sugar as a fuel additive. In fact I believe alcohol is such a good water attractant that ever time you add it to your motor fuel you are adding water to your tank just like you do when you fill up with ethanol enriched gasoline, requiring more isopropyl alcohol to keep you motor mobile in cold temps. Keep this under your hat, I suspect you won’t make yourself popular in the Corn Belt by disking ethanol.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  7. #7
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrapfe View Post
    Keep this under your hat, I suspect you won’t make yourself popular in the Corn Belt by disking ethanol.
    I am no fan of the use of corn for fuel. Not
    cost effective.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    I am no fan of the use of corn for fuel. Not
    cost effective.
    Me either.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
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    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    I am no fan of the use of corn for fuel. Not
    cost effective.
    But CORN has an will be the main fuel for humans for lots more years to come, most everything we eat has a form of CORN in it.

    It also does the most harm to the body.


    JB:}
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Limestone Co, Alabama
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Bees View Post
    But CORN has an will be the main fuel for humans for lots more years to come, most everything we eat has a form of CORN in it.
    It also does the most harm to the body.
    Thats why you should always malt your corn before prepairing it fer consumption.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    New Gloucester, Maine
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Gas Line Treatment

    Short answer: you are correct. Much of what has been said on this topic is incorrect. For example, isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol) is more hygroscopic than ethyl alcohol (ethanol), as the azeotropic mixture of water and ethanol is 5% water and 95% ethanol and that of water and isopropanol is 10.3% water and 87.7% isopropanol. Water does not dissolve in gasoline to any great extent, and water is heavier than gasoline, so it collects in low points in the fuel system - the gas line - and if temperatures drop below 32 F, it freezes and blocks the line. Alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol) all work as anti-icing agents by "solubilizing" the water, in other words, water + alcohol will dissolve in gasoline and become dispersed. Water accumulates in gas tanks - in your car, in the gas station tank, at tank farms, etc. - by a variety of means. It can condense from the air and accumulate at the bottom of the tank - that is why you are encouraged to keep your tank full in the winter, when condensation is a bigger problem than in summer.

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