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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Dardanelle, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    5

    Question CCD and Africanized honey bees

    I spent an hour this morning reading articles posted on Apitrack and I was wondering if any researchers or keepers of AHB are seeing Colony Collapse Disorder in AHB?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1workerbee View Post
    I spent an hour this morning reading articles posted on Apitrack and I was wondering if any researchers or keepers of AHB are seeing Colony Collapse Disorder in AHB?
    I don't know about your state, but in my state it is illegal to knowingly keep Africanized bees.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Dardanelle, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I can't say where, but I read about a gentleman in a southern state working isolated colonies of AHB on desert plants. I thought it was outrageous myself. Perhaps I read it wrong and he is across the border, but frankly just because it is illegal doesn't mean someone isn't doing it. I personally like to be on the side of the law.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,477

    Default

    Apitrack? Is that another bee related web site?
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Dardanelle, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default Apitrack

    I don't know or can't remember how I got onto Apitrack. Its a semi-monthly email that consolidates all the headings for all things bee related world wide with links to the original articles, assuming you can read portuguese, chinese, etc. It is a good way to keep up on (albeit news media generated) news about everything from harvests, to droughts affecting bees, to contaminated honey finds at custom inspection sites. Whatever was news worthy and is bee related. It includes things like bee festivals, extraction center openings, the new Mexican government bee commerce rep, etc. but with links to the articles, you can pick up on stories from different regions that may involve quarantines, contaminants, legislation regarding bees in other states or countries. Check out http://apitrack.com They appear to be a company offering solutions for monitoring hives and hive product, but the newsletter button is on the front page. Again, I think I was added through my dealings with a beekeeper association, as I don't recall signing up, but I enjoy the info.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    227

    Default Africanized bees in Honduras

    Iíve worked with Africanized bees here in Honduras for the last 18 years. I havenít experienced anything like CCD with my bees (about 60 to 70 hives in two different yards) and havenít heard of it occurring in Honduras or Central America. And hopefully it wonít happen down here.

    One of the upsides of the Africanized bees is that they definitely seem hardier when it comes to diseases and pests. I work part of the year in the States with a commercial beekeeper and the bees back there seem like wimps when compared to the Africanized bees here. If you donít treat for diseases and pests in the States you are probably going to have problems. Not so from my experience with the bees here.

    My hives have mites but Iíve never seen them get to the point where they decimate the hive (or even cause problems). Nosema and foul brood havenít been a concern for me. No small hive beetles either (and crossing my fingers they never will be a problem). I donít treat my hives with anything or for anything.

    And maybe not having this chemical build up in the combs and with the bees is one of the reasons CCD doesnít seem to exist here. The treatments are available but most people donít seem to use them (but the cost of them also has to be a factor in why they donít use them).

    It seems that a person here usually loses hives in larger numbers because they arenít feeding them enough during the dearth (the rainy season here). We get extended rainy periods down here that are worse than normal when hurricanes are coming through the area. The roads get in bad shape and if you have to drive up into the mountains where youíre bees might be, youíre not going to get to them. Or maybe the person simply canít afford to buy that much sugar. At the first indication they are running out of stores, the hive absconds. They donít hang out in the hive waiting to starve to death.

    The Africanized bees are ornery but a cross with European bees will make them calmer and easier to work with. But at the same time it makes me wonder if this cross/hybrid would also be more susceptible to all the disease and pest problems in the States.

    Itís seems to be a give and take situation with having Africanized bees or European bees. Is it preferable having a hardy bee or a gentle, calm bee? There are advantages and disadvantages to both. I donít think I would advocate for managing Africanized bees in the States but they are ďtheĒ bee in Honduras so a person technically does have a choice here.

    ----------
    Tom

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Dardanelle, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Tom
    Thanks, for the reply. I don't use chemicals on my hives either, and have seen no pest infestions or mites, but my hives are isolated compared to most. I am still trying to figure out where they forage however, which is a big concern as this is an agriculture state and people use pesticides. I will be curious to see how they fair this winter and look forward to our first flowers in March. CCD is like a puzzle. Its going to be a matter of putting all the pieces together.

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