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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    9,658

    Default k) Diseases & pests

    Different "treatment" paths to consider, pro/con. IPM strategies.
    What should a first year beekeeper concern themselves with?
    How to decided whether to treat or stay treatment free.
    Last edited by Barry; 03-04-2014 at 03:05 PM.
    Regards, Barry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    100

    Default

    That is the way I do it;
    Get some bees in the oil as the top of the oil tray is not very tight against the bottom of the screened bottom board. (also get ants, yellow jackets and anything the bees drop thru the screen)

    The oil gets pretty nasty if I leave it too long between changes. It definitely controls the SHB;
    JG

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wurtland, KY.
    Posts
    50

    Default

    http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pest&disease/pppdIndex.html

    A good site to identify some of the pest and disease that your bees have

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Default

    We don't have SHB here, but if varroa drop a couple of inches or more below the screen, they can't get back and die miserably.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,543

    Default Re: i) Diseases & pests

    Docking

    I have used a screen bottom board with a pan of mineral oil under a SHB infested (queenless hive) and it cleaned up so I later added a queenright nuc on top and the hive is looking verry good now, after I pull honey I intend to have all my hives on the new SBBs
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,658

    Default Re: i) Diseases & pests

    From Andrew Dewey in another thread:

    How does one impart to new beekeepers – specifically those taking a Beekeeping 101 type class – that thinking Beekeepers take time to consider Pest/Parasite loads before deciding on a method of dealing with the pest/parasite?

    Please don't have this thread become a treatment/treatment free argument.

    What I'm after instead is a methodology that very inexperienced beekeepers can successfully adopt to follow an IPM strategy.

    For those not familiar with IPM (Integrated Pest Management,) the concept is in very rough terms 1) identify the pest/parasite/disease that is present, 2) determine a threshold of injury that you can live with, 3) develop an understanding of the life cycle of the pest/parasite/disease so that steps can be taken (cultural or chemical) to reduce their impact, once the economic threshold is passed.

    Beekeepers have a bit of an advantage in that Varroa and Nosema are predictable problems and tend to be annual in occurrence.

    I'm trying to avoid saying “you'd best treat for Varroa in August to help ensure that you have lots of healthy parasite free winter bees.”

    Many of the new beekeepers I work with are not interested in testing or making detailed observations, nor are they necessarily starting with bees that have any genetic ability to coexist with the pests/parasites/diseases in question.

    Please keep in mind that we are talking about people new to beekeeping and that simple often oversimplified answers are what are remembered.

    I'm tempted, and I caught myself a bit in class last night, to talk about beekeeping requiring a thorough understanding of both colony and individual bee life cycles, so that when confronted with a pest/parasite/disease there is an understanding of the impact to the colony.

    A thorough understanding of colony/bee life cycles is beyond what can be taught in the limited time of a Beekeeping 101 class, especially when students are worried about 1) sourcing bees, and 2) are they going to get stung when they install their bees?

    Do you say “Welcome to the adventure and by the way there are intermediate and advanced classes on all these topics offered by our state Association and EAS.”

    As an instructor I want my students to succeed in beekeeping, to keep their bees alive through the winter, making some surplus honey along the way.

    I don't want to say “3/4 of you will find yourselves with dead hives next spring.”

    Thoughts?
    Regards, Barry

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canterbry, UK
    Posts
    1,798

    Default Re: k) Diseases & pests

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Different "treatment" paths to consider, pro/con. IPM strategies.
    What should a first year beekeeper concern themselves with?
    How to decided whether to treat or stay treatment free.
    I think this should provide a starting point to that question:

    "QUEENS FOR PENNIES

    Randy Oliver

    American Bee Journal, March 2014, 273-277

    Page 273 only

    I've been encouraged in recent years by the number of beekeepers who appear to be successfully keeping locally-adapted stocks of bees without treatment for varroa. I am a strong supporter of their efforts, and see them as the wave of the future.

    Unfortunately there is also great deal of confusion as to what 'treatment free' beekeeping really means.

    Allow me to use an analogy to explain:

    Dairymen prefer to keep Holstein cattle. Holsteins are thin-skinned. thoroughly domesticated cattle selected solely for milk production. Their normal care requires shelter, supplemental feeding, routine vaccinations, and treatment with antibiotics. If a dairyman turned his Holsteins out on the range to fend for themselves without care, and half of them died each year he would be accused of having committed animal neglect -- the failure to provide the basic care required for an animal to thrive.

    Yet this is exactly what thousands of recreational beekeepers do every year. Under the misconception that they are practicing [sic] 'treatment free' beekeeping, they are in actuality simply neglecting their domesticated animals. The reason for this is that they are starting with commercial package bees -- bees akin to Holstein cattle, in that they are bred for high brood and honey production under standard management practices (notably mite management, but also supplemental feeding or antibiotic treatment if indicated). Most commercial bee stocks should be considered as domesticated animals. There is absolutely no reason to expect that your wishful thinking will miraculously transform your newly-purchased 'domesticated' bees into hardy survivor stock able to survive as wild animals without standard care and treatment."

    Mike (UK)
    Last edited by Barry; 03-05-2014 at 03:07 PM.
    Anti-husbandry: Medication + Reproduction = Continuing Sickness
    http://www.suttonjoinery.co.uk/CCD/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,658

    Default Re: k) Diseases & pests

    From Michael Bush in another thread:

    "Those who insist beekeepers have to treat have driven off more people than you know. I have gotten, not just hundreds, but thousands of emails from people who wanted to keep bees, went to classes where all they talked about where all the antiboitics and chemicals and they were ready to give up the entire idea until they found there were people keeping bees without treaments. I wonder how many thousands did not find out there was an alternative and just gave up before they started."
    Regards, Barry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Laurel Hill, Fl
    Posts
    471

    Default Re: k) Diseases & pests

    I'm in my second year, had lots of SHB, went to IPM boards with oil trays. I rarely see a SHB now. I read a study that it reduces mites by 14%, but it won't save your hive from mites. Not enough fall off, even with dusting. but they sure work on SHB. Ditto the nasty oil if you leave it on too long. I love that it also kills roaches and ants. A new beek can easily do this. It's probably too expensive for a lot of hives.
    Robbin NW Florida(8A) / 14 hives / 2 nd Year / 4 TF - 10T {OAV}

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,658

    Default Re: k) Diseases & pests

    Andrew Dewey wrote:

    "success for me is new beekeepers overwintering bees and making a honey crop in their second year. I would prefer they not treat by the calendar as I don't think treatments are sustainable long term and I have grave concerns regarding ag chemicals in general. I do not have great confidence that the current crop of hard chemicals will be effective 5 years from now, and I want nothing to do with the year they are found not to be effective. Not so much this year but in the past I have had students announce to me that they were going to be TF - perhaps I am trying to honor their intentions too much.

    You raise a very valid point - what is success and how do we get new beekeepers to be successful. Maybe my crunchiness is showing in my old age. I am not inclined to prophylactic treatments but I've been around long enough to know potential consequences and to have decided on options. AFB=fire as an example."
    Regards, Barry

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