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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Dane County, WI.
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    Looks like woodpecker to me also. It was interesting just to research this a bit because the first site that came up was the University Colorado about woodpecker damage; to buildings mostly.

    This is an article from a British beekeeper:
    http://wbrc.org.uk/WORCRECD/issue%20..._attacking.htm

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    I wonder if they're doing it to eat bees? Guess I can't think of why else they would... the territorial rapping doesn't tend to make holes. Maybe I should refill the suet!
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
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    3,770

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    Woodpeckers have an uncanny way of finding insects. I could go outside right now and take pictures of the woodpecker holes in my barn. Typically, I find Carpenter Bee holes nearby. I would guess woodpecker or something very similar.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,031

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    Mystery solved!

    http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a60...ivedamage5.jpg

    Now how to I get rid on the bugger? I suppose I could circle the hive with hardware cloth.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

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    pellet gun?

    staple some rubber snakes to the side of the hive.....might work.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    490

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    It looks like a woodpecker to me.
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
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    Rubber snakes?!!

    I hope that 'Flicker' knows that snakes don't come out with snow on the ground!!

    The British beekeeper used chicken wire. That may be cheaper and less bulky than hardware cloth. Rubber snakes. Guess there's no harm in trying it. A plastic owl might work too.

    Glad you were able to get a photo. Are there two of them?
    Last edited by Oldbee; 01-04-2009 at 12:02 PM. Reason: addition

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,031

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    We have so many flickers here I can't tell, though they tend to be territorial with their pecking sites. Chicken wire's a better idea, I'll try that. More flexible and cheaper! I did put out more suet too in case it's food he's after.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
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    Just a note, though you may know this already. Flickers are one of the few woodpeckers [that I know of] that routinely feed on the ground; they feed on ants as one food source in the summer. Maybe this is one reason why woodpeckers do not damage beehives all that much, because most of them feed higher up in trees. The 'Green Woodpecker', mentioned in the British article, also feeds from the ground.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

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    .22 bird shot. It won't penetrate the wood on the boxes. PS. it won't fire through a silencer.
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,431

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    Yes, put out suet.
    Regards, Barry

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbee View Post
    Just a note, though you may know this already. Flickers are one of the few woodpeckers [that I know of] that routinely feed on the ground; they feed on ants as one food source in the summer. Maybe this is one reason why woodpeckers do not damage beehives all that much, because most of them feed higher up in trees. The 'Green Woodpecker', mentioned in the British article, also feeds from the ground.
    I'm wondering if that's what attracted him, the dead bees outside the entrance. But they're here all the time anyways, it's an odd day working in the yard that you don't see or at least hear them. I was joking about silencing the rimfire, btw . Even if I didn't like birds enough to set out feeders and bring full-size binoculars when I walk the dogs, you'll note the neighbor's car immediately behind the hive and oh yes that's MAIN street it's parked on. So no snake-charmers from the .357 .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Chittenango,Ny (upstate)
    Posts
    309

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    I think it's a small rodent. Most likely a mouse. A skunk or racoon would leave scratches around the edges and it would be hard for a larger animal to reach the hive with the hive stand you have.

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