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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida, USA
    Posts
    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    Considering the National Honey Board is now basically run by the Packers and Importers don't look to them to protect American Honey Producers. The "cheap" imported honey is also the major factor in keeping domestically produced honey prices low. Bizzybee is right about people compromising principles for a buck, especially the large corporations...its all about assets and liabilities. Like the article says, very seldom is anything done by the Feds. and if the company is fined or the honey confiscated they write it off as the price of doing business and you can bet the next time they will be more careful getting in that "cheap" honey from overseas.

    And the packer says in the article that they use American Honey when they can. Yes, but at what price? $1.00 a pound? $2.00 a pound? No wonder at that offering price they're not really looking at maximizing obtaining it from the US.

    This has actually turned into a wonderful sales brochure for me. It simply means more news about how awful the imported honey is. It also means I can just keep a few bottles of honey purchased from the large grocery chains around here and can show people on the back of these store bought bottles the whole list:Argentina, Vietnam, Canada, USA, ETC.

    So many bottles list so many countries. It's very easy to figure out how is it possible it's economical to take in honey from all those countries? It's not of course, that's just the Journey it took!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,245

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    I sell all of my honey production through a production and marketing arm of BeeMaid Honey Cooperative. All the honey packed through BeeMaid honey is produced by the beekeepers who own membership to the Cooperative. They sell a 100% pure Canadian brand of honey. Also they sell thier surplus honey on hand into the exprot market, as 100% produced Canadian honey.
    This is the branding consumers want, and like to see. This is also the assuance wholesale honey buyers like to have. It does provide an advantage to be able to market the honey under a controled group of beekeepers but it also puts BeeMaid at a termendious disadvantage with thier pricing. On one hand the members are pounding the tables for the best price on thier produce, and the other BeeMaids retailers are pounding the table for tighter priceing with thier tight competition.

    I tell you, even with BeeMaids 100% Canadian Honey marketing campain, they still are being beat out in may retailers by cheaper blended brands.
    But that said, our market share is increasing, not only at home, but also overseas in markets like the Middle East and China itself.

    Just an interesting comment our CEO made a couple of years back at our AGM, he said if a packer could tap into just 1% of China's high end honey market, there wouldnt be enough on board and off board honey produced in Western Canada to fill that market,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida, USA
    Posts
    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Just an interesting comment our CEO made a couple of years back at our AGM, he said if a packer could tap into just 1% of China's high end honey market, there wouldnt be enough on board and off board honey produced in Western Canada to fill that market,

    Hmm...My math is bad. What is 1% of 2 Billion people? lol.

    Hey, would you mind sharing what you're getting per lb for your honey sold to the coop?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,245

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    >>Hey, would you mind sharing what you're getting per lb for your honey sold to the coop?

    I can tell you what I ended after last years final, 1.1$/lbs white,
    This year the projections are looking 1.35-1.5$/lbs, all depending on how stronge the price holds throughout next year,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida, USA
    Posts
    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    >>Hey, would you mind sharing what you're getting per lb for your honey sold to the coop?

    I can tell you what I ended after last years final, 1.1$/lbs white,
    This year the projections are looking 1.35-1.5$/lbs, all depending on how stronge the price holds throughout next year,

    That seems to be the bulk price around here as well. No wonder I sell mine off the back of my truck for $7.00/lb. lol. Of course then my volume is pretty small ;-)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,245

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    >>No wonder I sell mine off the back of my truck for $7.00/lb

    I sell my honey house honey for 6.5$/kg, creamed white honey. Cheaper than in the stores, otherwise I wouldnt sell a wholelot.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida, USA
    Posts
    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    >>No wonder I sell mine off the back of my truck for $7.00/lb

    I sell my honey house honey for 6.5$/kg, creamed white honey. Cheaper than in the stores, otherwise I wouldnt sell a wholelot.
    I didn't mean to hijack this thread into a "what do you get for your honey" thing, but certainly it's topical when you consider that the Chinese et al honey has a definate bearing on how large the gap is between their retail price and a backyard beek's. If anything the more news there is about adulturated, health hazard overseas honey, the more my price becomes justified.

    As many on the threads here have said, anyone can sell their honey for 2 or 3 bucks a pound, and quite quickly. It's where sales, marketing and the ability to educate your local buying public to make them realize the true value buy is locally produced honey. Then you have hit the 6-8 buck per pound territory most of us are sitting at. I always hang my hat on the sentiment that I cannot compete with Wal-mart price wise, but they can't compete with me on quality or "love" in their product. Consequently anyone who is buying strictly on price can go buy that 5 country abomination they're passing off as honey at their grocery store.

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