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Thread: Foaming honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fayetteville, Ga
    Posts
    7

    Question Foaming honey

    Extracted honey was put into half gallon clean jars in July 2008. Looked fine. Used fine filter. In Dec 2008 retrieved a jar from basement storage to find granulation. Heated to handle granulation. After heating, when poured a thick foam eventually forms on surface. The taste is OK but nothing to win a blue ribbon. Granulation is not unusual for this area of GA.

    What's the cause of this foam? Never had this problem in my many, many years keeping bees. Thanks, Shoal Creek

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
    Posts
    376

    Default

    sounds like your makeing mead:}:}


    JB:}
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Clinton, Illinois
    Posts
    91

    Default

    It seems to be a by-product of the heating process. I've had the same thing happen after heating honey that's started to granulate. I'd like to hear what others have to say too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    469

    Default

    How did you heat it and to what temp?

    do you know your moisture content?

    Jack

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,243

    Default

    I've seen honey foam before. It was due to some amount of fermentation going on. Often, when honey crystalizes, there is a liquid layer on top. This is thin, and can ferment. So, check for fermentation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    clayton cal.
    Posts
    199

    Default

    The foam is caused by the release of carbon dioxide gas -which is a by product of some fermentation-if the jars crystallize solid fermentation stops if only partially fermentation can exelarate-if the jars where crystalized solid you may see white streaks in the solid honey this is from the release of carbon dioxide gas-RDY-B

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

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    Every year, I extract some cascara honey.It is dark and very thick( like 13%), and never granulates.Any heating at all in the sump will cause it to turn foamy and milky white. Eventually it settles out with a layer of creamy foam on top.An old honey plants book mentions honey from this source as medicinal. Not sure if any of this is relevant to the OP's problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    In my experience, the same thing that makes your honey cloudy after extraction (unheated) is what makes the foam. It is microscopic air bubbles that are trapped by the spinning process. As you spin, there are millions of honey threads laid one on top of another. Air gets trapped.

    As the honey is warmed it's viscosity becomes much lower and the air bubbles rise to the top forming foam. The foam generally won't dissipate because the surface tension is too high. So, drain the honey from the bottom after warming and you will get clear honey until the foam reaches the outlet.

    It is also my opinion that these tiny air bubbles are in fact the point sources for granulation to start. With my cloudly honey (full of these air bubbles) it will stay liquid for a week but then become solid overnight. At that point there are no visible crystals, it is almost like creamed honey

    Fuzzy
    Last edited by Fuzzy; 12-29-2008 at 11:13 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    Makes sense to me Fuzzy. Thanks.

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