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Thread: LOOKING for job

  1. #1
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    Default LOOKING for job

    Hello

    Thought I would give it a try. My 14 year old son is very interested in beekeeping. He does 80% on our hives. He want to be a biologist and work in bee research on day. My question, Is anyone in the SOUTHEAST Ga or NORTHEAST FL needed any help on a commerical bee farm this summer. He wants to work just for the learning experince. Would have to be within driving distance of our home within reason. So I could get hime to and from. Just thought I would put it out there..

  2. #2
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    Default

    Was just looking at craigslist and saw a job listing for beekeepers in Pickens, SC. You might run across something in your area.

  3. #3
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    Default I would let him.

    I would let him help us some this summer. Only because of your name here. I am close to Valdosta if that's not to far for you. I know it's a pretty good distance and nobody works for free here I would pay him something it's not fair any other way. I have a 15 year old myself that helps me. We pollentate so he wouldn't get much involved in larger honey production though.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesuslives31548 View Post

    He want to be a biologist and work in bee research on day.
    I had dreams of that long ago myself. To be qualified for the job, he'll need a BS and MS in the biology fields, like entomology for instance. To make good money, he'll also need the PhD. The bee research jobs are few and far between, not much funding I guess. But with the work experience and education, he should be able to find one.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replies and suggestions. I like to help him explore options and see what things are really like. After being a firefighter paramedic for 20 years I would hope he would go do something else. Not a bad job, security is good just alot of bad memories over the year. Merry Christmas

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesuslives31548 View Post
    Thanks for the replies and suggestions. I like to help him explore options and see what things are really like. After being a firefighter paramedic for 20 years I would hope he would go do something else. Not a bad job, security is good just alot of bad memories over the year. Merry Christmas
    I am a molecular biologist and sideline beekeeper and can see a huge need for someone to develop tissue culture techniques for honeybee cell culture. The lack of cells makes bee biology stone age research. I cloned a honeybee gene (telomerase) for the fun of it and tinkered with cell culture but couldn't get it working any better than already published results. Someone with a good head, and some business sense might be able to qualify for an SBIR or STTR grant for such research because there is a market for alternative insect cell lines. Honeybee research may become more lucrative by the time he gets out of school. Just thinking out-loud.
    A Ph.D. is helpful at getting anywhere in the biological sciences.

    Best of luck.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Thanks for the reply, he has enjoyed reading the responses. I would hope the goverment will wake up and see the need for more research and snwers in the bee world. I thought CCD would get the ball rolling faster and more attention and money wold be put in the bee research area due to the world hunger issues we would face with-out them.

  8. #8
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    Default Nobody new

    Dad's 73 years old and has had bees for years that's what he says. We have more old time beekeepers fading out and nobody taking up bees as careers. I see it on all sides here research, honey packagers, crop pollination, honey production everything. I hear there are several FL bee inspectors in the next few years up for retirement. What is going to happen if no one is there to take the place? We need dedicated educated young people in this business. My son claims to be interested in bees as a career and taking over ours in time. That's going to require college for him I'm a hard tail about that. I send my kids to ABAC here in GA and Josh will spend time there as well. If being a beekeeper is his future then it's Farm Management major with a entomology minor. Or something to that effect learn how to manage the business and learn about the bugs that are our life. The problem here is beekeeping is a small part of the over all farming in the country making us over looked often by all. Showing what's available for careers is how we get people intrested in what's going on and oppertunities they can reasearch more. I don't feel there are riches to be had in bees but a person can make a living thought.

  9. #9
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    Agree, and would add as we all are aware, without bee's No Farm. When I was growing up everyone had a small garden, A large operation would be 100 acres. Now as we have changed you dont see the backyard gardens ( except on my land). This put a large stress on the farmers. God made the bee for pollenation. Now we see bees shipped everywhere to manage an un-natural large farm operation. Going from 1000 to 10,000 acres requires alot of bess. More then can be found feral in the area. Its great for folks like you to make the money and have the dedication and desire to raise bees, build equipment and move bees all over to do the job they where made to do. What needs to happen is the fact that due to farm size growth, feral bee decline, CCD, Mites and all the other problems, the Commerical bee keeper should recieve as much goverment assistance as the farmer if not more. As mentioned prior without bees no farm. I know the guys arond the swamp that loss hives that where cut comb producers where not covered under fedaeral insurance, but the liquid honey producers where. I spent 14 days on the fire and saw many bee hives destroyed not to mention the loss of feral colonies. I PRAY GOD WILL BLESS YOUR BUSSINESS AND FOLKS WILL WAKE UP AND SEE IMPORTANCE OF IT...........

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesuslives31548 View Post
    the Commerical bee keeper should recieve as much goverment assistance as the farmer if not more.
    the only result i can see by doing as you suggest is that beekeepers (and the industry) will become perpetually dependent on govt assistance....which will in turn stifle innovation. this is exactly the wrong direction.

    deknow

  11. #11
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    Default Pursuing a Ph.D.

    Just a word of caution about pursuing a Ph.D. in biology - I have a Ph.D. in Zoology (my field is mammalogy/vertebrate ecology, as well as training in anatomy) from the University of Oklahoma (2000). Before pursuing a Ph.D. in organismal biology, you should be aware that nearly ALL of the jobs in the field are in teaching (Community College through Universities). There are a small number of jobs periodically with the Federal (BLM, NSF, NPS, etc.) and State agencies, but, if you get a Ph.D. in organismal biology, you will almost certainly be teaching in some capacity, and conducting your research secondarily.

    You should also know that starting salaries for Assistant Professors at most 4 year schools is between 40-45K - that is most certainly NOT BIG money when you consider: 1. the student loans you will be carrying as well as 2. the 5-10 years you went to school instead of work (on average, your first, tenure track position will come between the ages of 30-35, although, I have colleagues who were in their 40's before finally getting something full time). Starting salaries at community colleges are about 10K less. Full-time professors typically 'top out' well under 100K after 20-30 years.

    Again, this applies to degrees in organismal biology only. The prospects (and pay) are better for cell and molecular biology (mostly, I think, because there is a viable private sector for these fields).

    Please do not misunderstand, I LOVE what I do - but I had better, because I spent a TON of time getting the degrees, put up with ENDLESS grief from advisors who threaten students with their futures if they don't conform to the advisor's research ideas and, while my family and I live comfortably, we are certainly not the Rockefeller's (for instance, I don't have NEARLY enough money to spend on bees!)

    When I advise students now (typically 18-21 year old college students), I tell them - If you want to get a Ph.D., make sure that you have at least 10 years after college to invest and that you LOVE teaching. Otherwise, a Masters degree is more valuable because, while it precludes you from competing for grant money (in most cases) and directing independent research (again, in most cases), it does: 1. provide you with more career flexibility, 2. is considered post-baccalaureate work experience by employers, 3. typically takes only 2-3 years to complete and 4. does qualify you to teach at the Community College level or as a lecturer at a 4 year school.

  12. #12
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    My expression of wording may not have been 100% clear. I don’t agree with Big Government and the ridicules spending it does along with the free handouts to Millions of capable people. But, why should the Cut Comb producers that lost there lively hood in Beekeeping along the Borders of the Okefenokee Swamp be denied Government assistance to their losses and rebuilding expenses after Georgia’s largest Fire in History? A new law was pasted after the fact to assist them in the Future after the loss.
    (Liquid Honey Production was already covered). I consider myself a Hobbyist Beekeeper an maintaining 30-40 Hives depending on losses. I can handle that due to the fact that my Family does not depend on it.

    But I still stand on my belief that the Government should assist with Commercial Beekeeper losses. Innovated ideas have in the past come from Disastrous situations. CCD has helped Beekeepers in many ways. Mostly along the lines of public education. Speaking of innovated ideas here in the Deep South, the SHB and all the wonderful useless contraptions to prevent them. (Other then a Chemical Recommended by the Government not to use). Beekeeping knowledge has increase but not as much as other Ag studies. Like mentioned before with out the bee’s we know the long term consequences of our food source. Bottom line is in the future when another global destroyer of the Honey Bee comes along I hope there is Government money left to get the guys out of the hole that will needed it. Would like to hear some of the innovated ideas you may have on keeping the bee population going…

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesuslives31548 View Post
    Would like to hear some of the innovated ideas you may have on keeping the bee population going…
    Transgenics.

  14. #14
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    Was not sure what Transgenic was, had too look that one up. But I would have no argument for it or against it except some personal observations. (Not that they are scientifically backed). As with many other beekeepers I found the easy way to get back into the hobby was to buy package bees. What I soon discovered from the source I would purchase the bees from seem to have lost there fight. The bees are very gentle, unprovoked and seem unconcerned with nest disturbance. They produce from poor to moderate Honey in good years. I have a yard located in a cypress swamp area that has miles of tupelo, gall berry and titi along a river bank. These bees are very defensive, excellent Honey producers and have little problems with mites and SHB. They do swarm more and require the use of full protective equipment when manipulating. But several of the hives where from traps, and the remaining where cut outs in old houses that where not occupied for years. The remaining where splits from a combination of both.

    So my question would be if the bee package producers are only breeding queen with traits as first described at what point to they breed out the bee’s natural ability to fight off pest and predators? Just a personal observation I have made. Also bees from cut outs seem to have the same traits as the feral bees I mentioned as well. Not even sure if the word feral bee would even exist in 2008. Would be interested in seeing and aggressive disease resistant bee produced. What are you thoughts about the feral bees I mentioned compared to the package prodcued bees ? Thanks in advance for your reply.....
    Last edited by jesuslives31548; 12-28-2008 at 10:06 AM. Reason: added

  15. #15
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    Lake Park, Georgia, USA
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    Default What I want from the Government

    We make our living on bees and that is my only job. I worked for 20 years as a mason not helping my dad much in that time. Coming back I see the new problems we have that weren't there 20 years ago. When I left in the 80's the mites were new and I had never heard of the SHB then. It was the African bees that were going to ruin beekeeping as we knew it then. Now we never hear of them except from people not really involved in bees. Mites, beetles, and the African bees aren't natural here with no natural enemies to counter them. Brought in from other countries thanks to our trade agreements our government has put out there. It seems all the government can do is tell you what you can't use to control the pest they have given us. If there was as much research done for bees as there is on other things we could see some real answers. There are people working on these things I know UF is working because I deal with Jerry Hayes and Tom Dowda, but it's hard to work without any real funds. I'm not asking for a hand out never have never will. I only want a fair shake, don't spend millions on some overseas issue and ignore your own problems. But as dad says it's that squeaky wheel that get the grease and beekeepers can't squeak enough to get any real attention.

    Feral hives I agree with jesuslives that may not be a correct name for them in South GA. Where I live there are lots of timber tracts. This isn't the pine forest it looks like. It's a managed property for pine timber meaning the trees are planted in rows like other row crops. Doing this most of the hardwoods that would harbor the wild bees have been pushed or cut down except for the wettest areas were logging equipment can't get. I feel most other feral hives are in danger because of the new pest they have no ability to counter. I personally haven't seen a bee tree in years and feel any known should be left alone as they are an endangered species somewhat. We don't buy package bees so I can't compare. What I see is the colors of bees here. If I open a hive and the bees are darker, it maybe a hot one to work. On the other hand if they are a yellowish nature it's usually a calmer hive. The darker hives seem to to better than the others too. These feelings aren't backed by science just my personal feelings and observations in our yards.

  16. #16
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    I would second that motion. Mathispollenators deep in a larg eswamp where I have some hives located I have placed swarm traps with good luck. If your interested I can bring you a hive to start spits. I call them german black bees. They are mean as a bald face hornet but produce the most honey and build very quick. We checked and air map and could only locate one house within 13 miles. I found a few last year " bee hunting" another new hobby located in the burnt out cavity of a large water oak. we where quickly ran away by the bees but you could smell the honey many yards away. Just making and offer if you want to do some splits with some aggressive bees. Im sure I will get hammered on here for even suggesting it but, whatever.........
    Last edited by jesuslives31548; 12-29-2008 at 10:56 AM.

  17. #17
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    JL,
    If those are decendants of the German Blacks, they are GREAT producers. Folks used to have alot of them in the day! Yea, a little aggresive but worth the mother load. I hope he takes you up on the offer. A true Beek!
    Stonefly7

  18. #18
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    They reminded me of the bees I had for a 4-H project. I would like to get a true identification of them. I will try and take a picture today if it stops raining. I have made many splits off them. But not good bees to keep in the back yard. They hate lawn mowers.....

  19. #19
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    Default lol yea you might

    Yea you might get hammered for that but I know the bees. Or at least the types of bees and we have some like that. And those are just the hives I was refering to. I don't really need them for the splits but would like to get over there sometime and see them. I remember when you heard only of the German bees and the Itailan bees some of the names now are all new to me now. I feel like an idiot at times with all these breed names out there and I have no clue. Our darker bees are what I feel the old german breed. We had a swarm come in a empty hive under the carport once. They were a dark bee, when they first came in they were natrually calm like a swarm is. After they were moved and settled in man that was a hot one. You couldn't stay with them they would get so mad. I once thought I'ld requeen, no way couldn't stay in the hive long enough to find her. Had to close it up and get out of there. We left it were I orginally set it in the yard for years. I don't know what ever happen to the hive I'm sure it survived and was blended in with all the others in time. I can say every time I open one of our dark hives I think ot them. Those hive seem to always leave an impression.

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