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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    Putz asked
    >>But let me ask you, why do you want to get your queens laying so early in an observation hive?

    as I mentioned, it's a very small number of bees
    I'm afraid they'll naturally dwindle down to a point where they can't recover in the spring
    after reading Bullseye's comments maybe I'm worrying to much, my bees are in a similar condition to what he describes for his. perhaps I should just kick back and enjoy watching them

    Dave

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Default What are your outdoor hives doing?

    On Saturday mine were bringing in some bright yellow/orange pollen. I havn't looked but I suspect some already (or still) have brood. I think your OH should be at about the same point?

    A little off-topic: Are you running all small-cell and/or natural-cell in your hives (also in the OH) ? Any mite problems? I'd be real interested in your OH observations regarding varroa mites (including phoretic mite behavior) especially when brood starts appearing.

    To get brood going you might try feeding light (1:1) syrup and pollen (important) sub externally from the hive(s). Ext. feed stimulates the bees differently (hunter-gatherer forager) then something found in the hive.
    Triangle Bees

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drobbins View Post
    after reading Bullseye's comments maybe I'm worrying to much, my bees are in a similar condition to what he describes for his. perhaps I should just kick back and enjoy watching them

    Dave
    I was on pins and needles last late winter/early spring wondering if they would fail before they would start rebuilding. Yeah, I was worried, still am, but all I can do is be observant and hope for the best.

    They have all they need; stores, protection from the elements, why they even have some company in the form of two or three SHB, all they have to do is stay alive.

    BTW, mine are untreated on PC and I see no signs of mites or shriveled wings. Curiously, they stay close to the entrance that faces NW, it's 6 right now and they are right up against it. The only time they back away from it is when the wind is blowing hard and cold.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    maybe they need a vent to let the c.o. out
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    what is c.o.
    they have pretty good ventilation

    db, how's it going?
    the o-hive is all small cell, I see no visible sign of mites
    my other hives are mostly small cell
    I treated about half with OA last x-mas
    they all look great, kinda debating whether to use OA this year
    I don't know that I need it but I have all the stuff
    maybe I'll treat the ones I did last year and compare the treated hives with the untreated

    Dave

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,850

    Default

    Nice to see a fellow Ralinian (or whatever it's called) on these forums.

    Two years ago I put one deep frame of brood in the pattern the size of a softball, with one queen, and a little bit of honey in an OH in my room. They did just fine. They started laying earlier than any of the outside hives, and blew up before spring. I would say don't worry about them, they'll be fine.

    I got rid of the OH that fall, but after reading this thread I really want to crank it back up,like right now. Only I had a big loss of hives last year. Right now I'm down to one hive. I would love to put them in the OH, but they are too big.

    Anyone know who sells one frame of brood with one queen in December? Haha, looks like I'm going to have to wait till spring.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    I guess a little patience is all it takes
    I saw the queen with her butt down in a cell today and you can put the back of your hand on the glass in that area and tell they are keeping that area much warmer than a couple of weeks ago
    come on spring, I can't wait

    I messed around with trying to stream pre-recorded video of the o-hive
    can you folks see this??

    http://www.drobbins.net/simplevideostreaming.html

    I don't know if my connection is fast enough

    Dave

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,729

    Default

    >I guess a little patience is all it takes

    And passing the solstice...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    >>And passing the solstice..

    but, ya know, this soon after the solstice, the length of day has changed VERY little
    surprising how sensitive they are to this
    it clearly made the difference

    Dave

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Default

    Hi Dave,
    Your video looks great (a little jerky). Thanks for pointing out the queen. Can one layer of bees between the glass and comb warm it enough for brooding (92F)? Maybe you need to help them warm the glass a little. My bees are looking good. If this weather holds and we don't get a slightly more serious winter, I'll have to start making splits around mid-Feb.
    Triangle Bees

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    >>Can one layer of bees between the glass and comb warm it enough for brooding (92F)?

    in the past they've raised brood without a problem
    keep me informed on your split plans
    I want to make a few this year and could use a mentor to look over my shoulder

    Dave

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