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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Loaders

    When you guys say donkeys do you mean the plug ins on the back of a truck like turf loaders? The ones I have seen are 8 feet wide don't think that would work too good.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    When you guys say donkeys do you mean the plug ins on the back of a truck like turf loaders? The ones I have seen are 8 feet wide don't think that would work too good.
    http://www.donkeyforklift.com/beekeeping.html
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default loaders

    Thanks dbest there are some other makes around too, but it appears to me the wide front axle would be a real problem in limited space applications.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    5,041

    Default Stopping at scales

    [quote=Keith Jarrett;P.S. And I would love to go by the weight scales at 60mph with a load of bees on & give them the middle finger. [/quote]

    Even a pickup truck that has been converted to a flatbed has to stop at scales, and any trailer over 10200 gvw requires a commercial license.

    What size/type trailer on what kind of truck is required to stop at scales?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,359

    Default

    This is from DMV website:

    >>I'm a farmer and often use a one-ton duelie (duel rear wheel) pickup truck and a large trailer. Do I need a commercial driver's license?
    No, not if you are using the truck and trailer for agricultural purposes only (not for hire) and you don't drive farther than 150 miles from your farm.<<
    --------------------------------
    Now ,Thats not very specific about what qualifies as a large trailer. And I still dont know if you could blow by the scales.I agree however,it would be nice . Told the wife maybe with the state going broke,they would have to shut them down.She just laughed.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lafayette,Missouri,U.S.A.
    Posts
    54

    Default

    As i understand farm tags you are bound by the laws of the state the tag is issued in. There is no U.S. farm tag set of regulations so each state is (or could be) different.
    In Missouri all trucks 36,000 and up drivers need a CDL. In Missouri a semi with farm tags ( and there are many farm owned and tagged) can go anyplace in the U.S. with the farms cargo with farm tags as long as only the farms cargo is hauled.

    You will see these trucks on the interstate with "not for hire" on the side.

    There is a loophole in the Missouri law which says a farm worker can haul grain at harvest to the dump site without a CDL but the limit is 50 miles from the farm.

    You should be able to get the California rules from your DMV.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I have a tractor and trailer in Fresno right now with farm tags. I can go into any state (wheather they know it or not) with this. I can haul anything I own. I can't haul for hire. The big key is to buy the books, read them, and carry them with you when your on the road . The best one is the MVSS book they sell in truck stops.
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Andreas Ca. USA
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I would think that with all the steep winding roads aroudy you a dually would be the only choice. As for the piggy back lift on the rear I would think you would flirting with disaster as any weight behind the trailer axles could easily make the load on the truck too light, in theory you could balance it just right if you had the exact same load each time but hauling beehives I just don't see it.
    My wife and I have a machine shop and sometimes I can't get someone to pick up my scrap for recycling, I use a 28 foot gooseneck on a Cummins Dodge dually to haul my scrap bins ( 12 steel boxes 4 foot square and 4 feet high ). The 60 miles to stockton from here is a very scary ride in good weather because of the idiots that have to be in front on you because you have a trailer on no matter how fast or slow you drive, they pull out in front of you or pass and panic stop in front of you as they found out you were going faster than they thought, and a GVW around 25,000 to 30,000 don't stop just because you want it too even on dry roads with all the brakes in good shape. If the balance were thrown off because of a light load of bees or someone getting in your way they will be wrighting about you in the paper.

    I would think the truck with a trailer load of bees would be enough.

    Those big trucks with the lift on the rear have the rear wheels much heavier duty and farther back than I think you will be able to do with a pickup and a trailer IMHO.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default kustomizer

    What I love is when I signal to change lanes with considerable extra space, and they speed up. Signal already on, I give it just the right amount of time, then move over slowly, all the time keeping my eyes on the road and my hands on the wheel.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default kustomizer

    Didn't notice but WELCOME TO BS! I mean BEE S! No that's not right either...Bee Source! That's it!

    What do you build in your machine shop? Any Bee machines?

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Valley Springs, Ca.
    Posts
    135

    Smile Close to home!

    Hey,
    Close to home-Valley Springs here. Welcome.
    Jack
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-25-2009 at 10:32 PM. Reason: excessive quote

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,612

    Default

    got a hidden hitch for my truck today. It screws into a mounting under the flat deck. Rated for 30000lbs. Cost 700$ canadian after taxes. Cant wait to get it hitched up.
    No longer trying to stack pallets around the dam fith wheel hitch!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Andreas Ca. USA
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Howdy ,nice to feel welcome, the machine shop makes no bee stuff yet.
    Back to the forklift, trailer problem. I wonder if a clever guy could build a light forklift on the front of a quadrunner that would lift a hive and set it on a trailer. What kind of weight might we be lifting 300 to 400 lbs? Just a fleeting thought.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-25-2009 at 08:30 AM. Reason: unrelated link

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    clayton cal.
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Howdy ,nice to feel welcome, the machine shop makes no bee stuff yet.
    Back to the forklift, trailer problem. I wonder if a clever guy could build a light forklift on the front of a quadrunner that would lift a hive and set it on a trailer. What kind of weight might we be lifting 300 to 400 lbs? Just a fleeting thought.
    http://www.herbee.com/page15.htm RDY-B
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-25-2009 at 08:31 AM.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,287

    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    , the machine shop makes no bee stuff yet, .
    You got that right, Just wait till FreePeet shows up. lol

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Milanville Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Post Goose neck trailers

    Hi
    A 12 ton (24,000 lbs.) trailer is a bit big for some 1 ton trucks .A 16,000 lbs trailer on a 3/4 ton truck should hold about 236 hives 4 to a pallet empty if it is licensed for 25,500 lbs less when they are heavy with honey . As far as a donkey I found a small walk behind skid loader made by toro called a dingo I think that it would work good I have used them to move tool boxes and large sheving units in a shop I worked at. I am thinking about geting a trailer and a dingo to start hauling bees for other people .I have a 3/4 ton dodge diesel 4x4and I have hauled equipment up to about 15,000 lbs with no trouble, even in snow with miner trouble . I think a 3/4 ton is easer to handle in tight spots with a good set of heavy ply tires they don't sway on ths highway. and you only have 4 tires to buy not 6 they also get better milage do to being lighter . I get about 24mpg with just the truck on the highway. The worst I got was 12 runing in 4x4 in snow hauling a tractor (7 1/2 ton or so).
    Greg

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lafayette,Missouri,U.S.A.
    Posts
    54

    Default

    As a professional semi driver and beekeeper the one lesson learned is get the right equipment for the job.
    Much grief can be avoided.
    I have seen many contraptions for moving bees and most will work if one is willing to put up with the headaches.
    After many breakdowns i learned the truck rated for the load you are handling will make things run smoothly.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Milanville Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Default How to charge to move bee's ?

    Hi all
    I am looking at geting in to hauling bee's .I was wondering how would one go about seting a price to haul them, by the hive or the mile ? I was thinking by the hive . but I am not sure .Any advice would help.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MilanvilleGreg View Post
    Hi all
    I am looking at geting in to hauling bee's .I was wondering how would one go about seting a price to haul them, by the hive or the mile ? I was thinking by the hive . but I am not sure .Any advice would help.
    Usually by the loaded mile..........

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