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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,161

    Default goose neck trailers

    looking at a 12 ton twenty foot deck goose neck trailer.

    Here are my questions, how much tonue weight is there, if say, you had 168 hives (7 pallet rows) of bees on?

    Does anyone use a donkey (three wheel loader) and attach it to the back of the trailer?

    Do you need a dual tire one ton or would a single tire one ton work?

    Thanks Keith

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Stanislaus County, CA
    Posts
    69

    Default

    As im sure you know, the weight on the neck (the tongue, or weight pushing down on the axle of truck) would vary greatly depending on where the axles are located on the trailer. Axles centered under the trailer, virtually no weight on the truck. The farther back you push the axle the more weight on the truck. I pull a goosneck with a 24' deck, 5' beavertail, with a single rear tire truck. Make sure the GVWR on the truck and weight rating on tires are appropriate or the CHP can nail you there. The single tire works good, but the stability is so much better with a dually.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    OPP, Al USA
    Posts
    415

    Default

    12Ton (24,000lbs) should require 2400lbs on the hitch, going by what I've been told. I would want a Dually, it would just be a lot safer. And GOOD trailer brakes.

    I've pulled that kind of weight with a single wheel truck here on the farm and strongly discourage it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    keith ask:
    Here are my questions, how much tonue weight is there, if say, you had 168 hives (7 pallet rows) of bees on?
    tecumseh> a ton sound about right. the critical thing here is to have the ball (or fifth wheel) that set in the deck of your truck be approximately 6" in front of the axle.

    Do you need a dual tire one ton or would a single tire one ton work?
    tecumseh> unloaded (or very light load) I suspect a single tired one ton would work. when approaching anything that looks like capacity I would not hook it up to anything besides a dually. the owners manuals will specify pulling capacity of the truck... you can cheat here a bit (not a lot if you value your life) but you will pay in the working life of the vehicle.

    ps... what is the weight of a donkey? and I am still trying to figure how you plan to get 7 pallets on a 20 foot deck?????

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Hammond, NY
    Posts
    51

    Default goose-neck

    A year ago I Had a 26000 lb 32 ft goose-neck built( 8 ft deck over hitch) with
    2/ 12 thousand lb axles ,elect over HUD brakes it holds 20 pallets of bees 18000 lbs in weight and that has been my same question and the best answer I have gotten, is as a rule of thumb there is about 10% of the load transfer of weight to the truck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Yup I agree with Ted,
    Got the same kind of trailer as Ted, holds 20 pallets of doubles with skidder on back.
    My truck has single tires, the other farm truck has duals. It defenatly is safer with duals and seems to ride nicer, yet that good old FORD tone truck I use pulls a hell of alot better.

    One thing to consider when buying a tandem axle dual tire trailer, is pulling it through the mud!
    They dont pull worth a dam regardless what truck you got on frount. Tandem duals dont pull through the mud!!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, MS, USA
    Posts
    624

    Default

    If the trailer has tandem axles make sure they are the standard width apart. I have a 30 ft dual tandem that I move equipment and hay around with. It has the tandem axles spread apart more than normal and it really eats up tires when you turn short.

    I pull it with both a single tire F250 and a F350 dually. You can definatly tell the difference. I would recomend the dually for sure.

    Johnny

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Milanville Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Post Goose neck trailers

    Hi
    A 12 ton (24,000 lbs.) trailer is a bit big for some 1 ton trucks .A 16,000 lbs trailer on a 3/4 ton truck should hold about 236 hives 4 to a pallet empty if it is licensed for 25,500 lbs less when they are heavy with honey . As far as a donkey I found a small walk behind skid loader made by toro called a dingo I think that it would work good I have used them to move tool boxes and large sheving units in a shop I worked at. I am thinking about geting a trailer and a dingo to start hauling bees for other people .I have a 3/4 ton dodge diesel 4x4and I have hauled equipment up to about 15,000 lbs with no trouble, even in snow with miner trouble . I think a 3/4 ton is easer to handle in tight spots with a good set of heavy ply tires they don't sway on ths highway. and you only have 4 tires to buy not 6 they also get better milage do to being lighter . I get about 24mpg with just the truck on the highway. The worst I got was 12 runing in 4x4 in snow hauling a tractor (7 1/2 ton or so).
    Greg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lafayette,Missouri,U.S.A.
    Posts
    54

    Default

    As a professional semi driver and beekeeper the one lesson learned is get the right equipment for the job.
    Much grief can be avoided.
    I have seen many contraptions for moving bees and most will work if one is willing to put up with the headaches.
    After many breakdowns i learned the truck rated for the load you are handling will make things run smoothly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Milanville Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Default How to charge to move bee's ?

    Hi all
    I am looking at geting in to hauling bee's .I was wondering how would one go about seting a price to haul them, by the hive or the mile ? I was thinking by the hive . but I am not sure .Any advice would help.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MilanvilleGreg View Post
    Hi all
    I am looking at geting in to hauling bee's .I was wondering how would one go about seting a price to haul them, by the hive or the mile ? I was thinking by the hive . but I am not sure .Any advice would help.
    Usually by the loaded mile..........

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    It will cost you as much to haul one hive 1000 miles as 400 hives.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Milanville Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Hi Thanks
    That would work better ,Now that i think about it a bit more

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    983
    236 hives could easily weigh if doubles or 1 1/2 story 20,000 to 30,000 or more. Add this to the trailer weight and you are TOO HEAVY! Total gross on trailer would be way over 16k. total truck/trailer would be from 32k to 40k. If singles, the weight would probably be from 12k to 18k. still overweight on a 16k trailer. I have a 24 k gooseneck with aluninum deck and a 3500 dodge. with 144 hives (1 1/2 story)and a swinger I would gross out over 30k. 96 hives and swinger 26k. with no swinger I could haul about 144 hives. Bees are heavy....gotta ad truck(8k) trailer and bees. THats why I bought a freightliner!

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