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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    tulsa, ok usa
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    2,264

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    This would be a good story for the network news to pickup on. Hint hint.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hanford Ca
    Posts
    146

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    Hey Magnet-man I know this is off topic hey can you send me a pm. I had a wuestion about your bee suites /jackets. I saw one of your jackets when I met with Gregg Stewart when he was working his bees out here in Ca. And I think that it was fantastic especially in our hot 110+summers and doing cutouts removals. Please shoot me a pm or email me HHH_Farms@wildblue.net

    Angi
    Angi of HHH Farms Hanford Ca
    Organic Farm & heritage, rare breed poultry, ducks, quail

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

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    If the Canadians don't ban them then it will only delay things...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by MABee View Post
    I figure they are considering allowing it because there is a lot of money involved on both sides. Word is the USDA will be making a ruling on allowing the imports this Tuesday. Lets hope the big shots at the USDA care about the health of our American bees!
    Rather than just talking about the problem, why not write your congress men/women? If we just sit on our hands, and bite out tongues, we're going to get Tropilaelaps. I don't care what any gov't says. I don't care what APHIS says. I don't really care about almond growers. If we get that bug here, there won't be any almond pollination, honey production, BeeSource, or Bee-L.

    It's gonna be all over folks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,307

    Default Aussie pacs

    I believe that Canada did not allow Australian packages in 2008 on account of the SHB. Most packages come from the Queensland area, close to Sydney (international airport). This area has plenty of SHB. Canada on the other hand does not have too many SHB and wants to keep it that way.There had been some talk about getting packages out of western Australia which is apparently free of SHB. I'm not 100% sure if this plan worked out or not.

    Jean-Marc

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by jean-marc View Post
    I believe that Canada did not allow Australian packages in 2008 on account of the SHB.
    Its hard to imagine that shb would ever be a problem in Canada. As a creature of the tropics their ability to survive a Candian winter or even reproduce successfully in the summer just doesn't seem likely.
    Leave it to the bureaucrats.......
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,553

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    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    As a creature of the tropics their ability to survive a Candian winter or even reproduce successfully in the summer just doesn't seem likely.
    One wouldn't think they would be a problem in Wisconsin either, but I've heard reports of them getting into the honey house, causing problems in the stacks waiting for extraction and in the cappings awaiting rendering. I am not sure if they can winter indoors here but bees brought up from the south bring them and they do cause problems in fall here and I assume might impact nucs and splits earlier.
    They can reproduce in summer here.
    Sheri

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK and Sheri View Post
    They can reproduce in summer here.
    I was thinking more in terms of their abilityto reproduce is sufficient quantities to replace their winter losses. Can they sustain their populations in those northern climates? I figured the shortened warm season would limit them. Here in the piedmont of Ga they are on the boundary of that range, I believe. In the North Ga mountains they are a nuisance, at worst. But Canada? or WI or MN? I wouldn't have thought so.....but it wouldn't be the first time I was mistaken. I know that they can be brought in from the south. But will their populations grow without that migration?
    I hadn't thought about the mess they can make in a honey house.....although I've seen it first hand.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    Can they sustain their populations in those northern climates? I figured the shortened warm season would limit them. Here in the piedmont of Ga they are on the boundary of that range, I believe. In the North Ga mountains they are a nuisance, at worst. But Canada? or WI or MN?
    My initial infestation was caused by neighbors bringing in nucs from SC. First year wasn't too bad. A couple weak nucs with clusters of shb larvae on pollen. 50 beetles on the top bars of mating nucs. No damage. Second year, they showed up in my storage barn. Slimed a pallet of brood combs. Larvae parading across the concrete floor, and out the door. I burned the whole mess. Showed up in the hot room too. Learned real quick to extract right off. So I started thinking about coolers, and de-humidifiers, and beetle traps. The third year, in March, I am seeing beetles exiting nuc feeders as I'm filling them. Oh cute. They are wintering in Vermont.

    Then we had a cold winter. I haven't seen 10 beetles in the last 2 seasons.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Learned real quick to extract right off.
    That's been my response over the past few seasons. I'll only remove the supers I can extract within 24 hours. Its a pain.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Then we had a cold winter. I haven't seen 10 beetles in the last 2 seasons.
    This was what I would expect.

    Ah well....we've gotten far afield from the original thread. But, it just struck me that shb would be a poor reason to refuse Aussie packages into Canada....on the other hand, I can think of a number of very good reasons.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Stanislaus County, CA
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    69

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    Still no ruling from USDA. I was told today that "technically" the border is still open until the ruling. No shipments have been made though, being that if the USDA rules to block shipments those delivered or in transit would be destoyed! Know more possibly Friday.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,847

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    >>n. cerena

    I know a fellow who studdied nosema 10 years ago, finnished his schooling on it.
    Turns out the nosema he was studding was not apis, but rather cerena,
    Last edited by Ian; 12-19-2008 at 06:52 PM.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal,Quebec,Canada
    Posts
    36

    Default SHB in Canada

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    Its hard to imagine that shb would ever be a problem in Canada. As a creature of the tropics their ability to survive a Candian winter or even reproduce successfully in the summer just doesn't seem likely.
    Leave it to the bureaucrats.......
    SHB was found in Quebec, Canada last fall. The "experts" think it has been in the south eastern part of the province for at least two years. It seems that it went through a full reproduction cycle.
    I was told that some in favor of opening the borders on the Canadian Honey Council welcome these news as an extra arguement to have it open.

  14. #34
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >>I was told that some in favor of opening the borders on the Canadian Honey Council welcome these news as an extra arguement to have it open.


    I really doubt that,


    I havent heard of this as of yet, perhaps I have missed this in the beekeeping news. Do you have a link to a publication referencing this? Anything that I have read doesnt mention anything about the beetles reproducing over two years,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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    36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    >>I havent heard of this as of yet, perhaps I have missed this in the beekeeping news. Do you have a link to a publication referencing this? Anything that I have read doesnt mention anything about the beetles reproducing over two years,
    It's in french... second pdf file
    http://www.agrireseau.qc.ca/apiculture/default.aspx

    Those who have checked out the apiaries at the end of summer believe that it was here since at least two years. They have come to that conclusion because, the SHB had a complete cycle, which means the SHB larvae went into the soil and reproduced itself. This is the explanation I was told last november during our beekeeping meeting. How do they know this, I don't know! I'm not an expert...

    You can doubt what ever you want... Those who are for border opening will use it as an argument. Why wouldn't they?
    Last edited by cleareyes; 12-19-2008 at 09:44 PM.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vienna,Maine,USA
    Posts
    50

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    Mike palmer brought up Tropilaelaps this mite alone should be reason to close the border.

    "The life cycle and parasitism of A. mellifera by Tropilaelaps is similar to that of Varroa destructor
    although there are slight differences. Tropilaelaps has a higher reproductive rate than varroa as it
    has a shorter life cycle. This is because they have a faster development time and a shorter phoretic
    phase (non-reproductive transport phase, time spent on the adult bees) between reproductive
    cycles. Consequently, when both types of mite are present in the same colony Tropilaelaps
    populations build up far more rapidly than varroa, by a factor of 25:1 in favour of Tropilaelaps.
    I got this from here
    www.defra.gov.uk/hort/Bees/pdf/trop.pdf

    makes for scary reading

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,299

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    While officially there are no varroa or Tropilaelaps mites in Australia, one has to wonder how hard are they looking? What kind of testing is being done in the package producers yards to detect low levels? Anything less than a 24 hour forced drop onto sticky boards would be inadequate,in my opinion.
    I also find it suspicious that no mites were found in any of the Apis cerana exterminated so far. If we ever get this mite in the USA you can just bet it will be from Australian bees.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    5,847

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    >>http://www.oie.int/wahis/public.php?...&reportid=7393

    "The particularity of this event is the detection of specimens of adults and of larvae of Aethina tumida. This suggests, for the first time in Canada, that the reproductive cycle has been completed. "
    -Information received on 07/10/2008 from Dr Brian Evans, Chief Veterinary Officer, Canadian Food Inspection Agency

    This is interesting, now we have beetles that have completed the whole cycle. It will be interesting to see how well they are able to establish thier population trying to survive in a unfavourable breeding climate. Perhaps the populations will die off with the deaths of the wintering hives, unless they are able to sustain thier growth and development

    >>You can doubt what ever you want.

    My doubt is that they are making that kind of a comment on record, or are they? If they are, they might want to watch what
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
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    5,321

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon L View Post
    Consequently, when both types of mite are present in the same colony Tropilaelaps
    populations build up far more rapidly than varroa, by a factor of 25:1 in favour of Tropilaelaps.
    I got this from here
    www.defra.gov.uk/hort/Bees/pdf/trop.pdf

    makes for scary reading
    Diana Sammataro, in a talk on mites of the world, said that where both mites are present, Tropilaelaps would control the Varroa population. Further, that Tropilaelaps can't survive in colonies without brood. Now, I keep bees in the north, and our bees have a broodless period each winter. And, we need help controlling our varroa. So......?

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,299

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    So.... varroa problem solved Except those of us whose bees never really go broodless will keep them alive, to deliver to you the following spring

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