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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    521

    Default Unloading in CA?

    Got a question for you guys that migrate to CA in the Fall. What time of day do you unload out there? Reason I ask is that last year, and especially this Fall, seemed like the bees that were unloaded in the morning drifted terribly. Hives at the ends of rows and on the outside rows were blowing the lids off, while those in the middle (roughly an oval shape) were weak, still had a queen and brood, but short on bees. Anybody else seen this?

    Going to try to have them unloaded in the future late afternoon/early evening to give them time to settle in overnight and hopefully get a little more oriented the next morning. Comments?
    Gregg Stewart

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default Drift

    Yes Gregg you are right. Unless weather will keep the bees in, good drivers arrive at the end of day to unload. The drifting like you describe is detrimental. Morning is OK but you want the nets pulled and unloading at dawn, not 9 or 10 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    521

    Default

    Thanks for the response Tom. Although I am still wondering if makes any difference if they are unloaded even at dawn. Our last load was unloaded, I believe at dawn, on November 12. My two partners got out there that morning, about 11 am, and noted that the load that was unloaded that morning was in an uproar, virtually a cloud of bees above the hives flying around, while hardly any were flying around the other 3 loads.
    Gregg Stewart

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default Yellow rain

    The first flight rush probably can't be avoided, they want to poop and get a drink. Tight set and straight rows makes it worse. But the worst is unloading while the bees can fly, they're jumping off the truck, coming out of those on the ground, then when they return home has been moved. Out to the corners and ends they go. Can really mess em up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Early mornig is the best,daylight.We use every opurtunite of all the acreage, the bigger the space the better.and every other direction as well,for pallet placement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    We see this every year and I think it doesn't just occur on the first flight but other days as well. We have noticed drift from one week to the next. Those big pods of holding yards with long straight rows are the worst.
    Sheri

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

    Default

    Would it help if you blocked part of the entrance, or placed a branch in front of them so they had to reorinate to the hive. It seems to me that part of your problem is the girls are flying without realizing there hive has been moved.......
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

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