Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 70

Thread: Bee Log

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Bee log

    If you give it away immediately there is still hope that you could live a normal life.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    ok.............nah

    sugar syrup...5lbs sugar + how much boiling water ?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Middlesex NC
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by No_Bivy View Post
    ok.............nah

    sugar syrup...5lbs sugar + how much boiling water ?
    If you want 1:1 you need to use 25 lbs. sugar to 25 pints of water to make five gallons. In other words for 1 lb. of sugar use 1 pint of water or 2 lbs. sugar to 1 pint of water for the 2:1 syrup. You don't actually need to heat the 1:1 but it last longer IMO if you do.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Grover, NC, USA
    Posts
    32

    Default

    You are doing the right thing by trying to save the bees
    I am new here so I can not give you any help but I can Thank You for what your doing. Its great to see someone in your business taking an interest in saving the bees

    You can learn alot on here by Spring, I am learning myself as I am going to try to start 4 hives in the Spring myself. I wish I could find feral bees to start my hives with, and it looks like you will have a good start on yours. Good Luck to you and Thanks for trying to save the bees.

    Rondobee

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    429

    Default

    sugar syrup...5lbs sugar + how much boiling water ?[/QUOTE]

    5lbs of sugar is added to 10 pints of warm water (boiling water reduces in volume) this is 1:1

    5 lbs of sugar added to 5 pints of water will yield 2:1 mix.

    I would leave a gap of about 1/2 inch of space under the feeder.

    Be sure you have the feeder out by warm weather ( 60 F) and put frames in the hive body. put another hive body over it and put your feeder back in that one.
    Last edited by bigbore; 11-27-2008 at 06:49 PM. Reason: forgot where no bivy was

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    1lb.=1 pint
    5lb.=5 pint
    10lb.=10 pint

    5+5= 1 to 1
    10+5= 2 to 1
    You don't want to boil more than 1 minute, if at all. No measurable amount of water will boil away.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    I'll post some pics later.....

    I did not leave a gap since the are no frames like previuosly suggested.

    I used 4lbs to two quarts. Looks clear..tastes good too, or at least my kids think so

    temps hit 60, they were flying alot. Some carrying sawdust out of the hive where I drilled the hole. I guess I need to get a smoker thingy

    I watched a few vids of african honey bees, I'm glad they dont live around here, guess it's to cold.
    Last edited by Bizzybee; 11-28-2008 at 07:06 AM.

  8. #28

    Default

    Good Job on getting it all set up. Sounds like you're on track for a healthy new colony.
    Hook up with your local bee group. Best thing would be if you could beg/barter a deep box of honey (or even a medium) and get that on now so you know they have plenty of food for winter. They'll move up in to it in spring and you can get them out of the log by setting a queen excluder between the new hive and the log.
    Also, if you can, find a mentor. That makes a huge difference!

    I imagine you'll have no trouble getting "bee calls" for swarms and colonies in trees once people know you're a tree climber.

    (and yes, you need a smoker.)
    Erin Forbes, EAS Master Beekeeper
    overlandhoney.com

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    the video of the feeder being added....yes, I'm still a bit jumpy around bees.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_SSJnyCvhI

    the current set up



    I noticed a few carpenter ants around the inside feeder...should I bee worried?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Middlesex NC
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iddee View Post
    1lb.=1 pint
    5lb.=5 pint
    10lb.=10 pint

    5+5= 1 to 1
    10+5= 2 to 1
    You don't want to boil more than 1 minute, if at all. No measurable amount of water will boil away.
    Thanks Iddee;
    I thought I had been doing it wrong all this time.

  11. #31

    Default

    don't worry about the ants. They bother us much more than the bees.
    Erin Forbes, EAS Master Beekeeper
    overlandhoney.com

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    If I see bees "fanning" at the entrance, is that a sign the queen is still OK?

    or any signs I can look for....

  13. #33

    Default

    Looks great.
    Fanning is a good sign.

    The other thing you could do is set out an open feeder for pollen substitute.
    This is what I use in my yard (I actually started doing this for the first time when I brought home my bee log that I posted pics of earlier.)

    Here's the setup:
    http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j3...er92008068.jpg
    http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j3...er92008056.jpg

    I have a recipe for pollen patties that I found on the internet and that's what I use for the basis of my open feeding recipe. Here's how I make it in when I put it out in the bucket. (soybean flower and brewers yeast can be found at most health food stores - call first!)
    Sift all together through a traditional sifter:
    2 cups soybean flower
    1 cup brewers yeast
    1 teaspoon Vitamin C powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Then put it in the bucket. The "half lid" (or 1/3 lid, depending on how you cut it) is pretty important or the bees will blow the pollen substitute right out the front door when flying in and out.
    I bring mine in at night and put it out in the day because otherwise my dogs will get into it and eat it. BUT, if you were going to leave it out, I'd make sure it is tilted such that rain wouldn't get in (or even fashion some kind of a "visor/overhang" to keep rain out.

    Also, you may need to initially bait it with a little honey (not much - 1 tablespoon max). Once the bees have clued in to it, they'll look at it every morning to see if the pollen has magically reappeared.

    Do not put this directly in front of the hive. Put it at least 25 or 50 feet away. (If you attract other bees to the feeder, you do not want to be directing them to the log.) You can have it as close to the house as you'd like, as the bees will be very gentle at the feeder. Maybe put it somewhere you can see it out the window. Another way to help them find it is to buy some flowers and put them next to it. (in my second shot you can see an orange and a white mum next to the bucket.)

    Have fun!
    Erin Forbes, EAS Master Beekeeper
    overlandhoney.com

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    If they are taking Pollen, that means the queen is good? Sorry for all the dumb questions......

    Tree guy = Bee guy in training

  15. #35

    Default

    Yes - They need pollen to rear brood. Bees "eat" pollen and turn it into royal jelly - then feed royal jelly to larvae.
    Queen = eggs = larvae = need pollen
    Erin Forbes, EAS Master Beekeeper
    overlandhoney.com

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    Why the vitamen c powder?

  17. #37

    Default

    Real pollen contains lots of vitamins. Vitamin C powder is also a preservative.
    (real answer is that it was part of the original recipe and the bees seem to like it. If you can't get it, just go for the brewers yeast and soy flour - those are the real protein sources)

    Also, is that a second feeder that you have outside the box in your second photo?
    If yes, remove it. If you have wild bees in the area that will invite them to rob at the log. That's why the feeder is in the box - so other bees can't rob.
    Erin Forbes, EAS Master Beekeeper
    overlandhoney.com

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    it was a second feeder, and I did remove it. They did not seem to be interested in it anyway.

    I found a ladie with a bunch of equipment....but it needs a lot of work. I may get it and try to repair before spring...what should I offer for it?

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Powhatan, VA
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maine_Beekeeper View Post
    Looks great.

    Then put it in the bucket. The "half lid" (or 1/3 lid, depending on how you cut it) is pretty important or the bees will blow the pollen substitute right out the front door when flying in and out.
    I bring mine in at night and put it out in the day because otherwise my dogs will get into it and eat it. BUT, if you were going to leave it out, I'd make sure it is tilted such that rain wouldn't get in (or even fashion some kind of a "visor/overhang" to keep rain out.
    Would you use BeeMax powder that I use to make pollen patties?

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    a friend of mine who used to keep bees has old pollen in his refrigerator....maybe 4 yrs? Could you feed this to a hive?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads