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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Lyons, CO
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    Default Cordless sawzall and skillsaw: advice?

    It's WAY past time I got a cordless set of these for removals. I'm guessing 18V is the way to go? What do folks like/dislike about the rigs they've used?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
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    Default

    I bought the 18 volt black and decker set for +/- $100 a couple of years ago. Included drill, skill saw, sawzall, vac, and stud finder, and carry bag. I really like them. I bought an extra charger and 2 extra batteries. The skill and sawzall runs down the battery pretty quickly.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    If you're on a tight budget then I would recommend
    shopping ebay....... Get a quality unit and steer clear
    of any tool that still runs on NiCad batterys. NiMH
    are a far better choice and have come down in
    price.

    I have run Panasonic cordless tools for nearly 10 years
    on the job with great durability. I've had Porter Cable
    and DeWalt but they don't hold a candle to the Panasonic
    line.

    Voltage can be enticing but deceiving. My 15.6V Panasonic
    drills have more torque than the DeWalt 18V.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    If you want to get a Sawzall, you'll have to get a Milwaukee Tools brand, since that is their trademark... And, if I wanted a reciprocating saw (or circular saw) for demo work, I'd get a corded model. The battery models don't have the power or torque for any amount of extended work. Trust me on that.

    I have both corded and battery models (18 and 24V), and every time I get into some "real" demo work, I have to swap batteries, which even with NiMh is often. The corded models, for some reason, keep on going. If you want to buy some battery models anyway, I have Porter-Cable, and they work. Dewalt is okay as well. Corded - buy Milwaukee, their tools are way above other models in quality and durability.

    MM

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Default

    I can't talk details, but my husband has a wide variety. From what I gather, the 18V is a must if you want any power, but the tools are heavier. He also has a spare battery so it can be swapped out when the first inevitably goes dead when you need it most.

    As for brands, he has Makita (old, not 18V), Dewalt, Porter-Cable, so I can not deduce a preference. However, as Mapman said, the Milwaukee corded tools appear to be the best, because they are stored carefully and are not the ones used for every day use.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    MM is correct on corded tools. If you are going to do
    extended demo work they are better. My work truck
    has a corded saw in both reciprocating and circular
    for any extended or particularly nasty work.

    But for cut outs, and quartering a deer or elk, a quality
    cordless is fine. My Panasonic reciprocating saw cuts
    mostly angle iron for hanging doors and openers. It
    will cut a lot of 2" angle before I swap batteries.

    My Panasonic trim saw (5 1/2" circular) will cot well
    over 100 2x4's before battery swap.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    Default

    Good points all. I probably could get away with a trim saw; it's really only for shallow cuts in sheathing or the like. Pretty unusual to have to use it, it's almost always the sawz... reciprocating saw. And for cutouts I don't think I've yet put more'n 15 minutes of total run time on either the reciprocating saw or the circular, which is why I was thinking cordless. I would use these infrequently enough for anything but cutouts that the short-use models would be OK.

    $100? Seems like I'm seeing them for more like $300. It seems like it's the batteries that are the spendy part?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Smithsburg, Maryland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I'll be darned if I'm paying for a skillsaw or sawzall, catchy names but there are better reciprocating saws and circular saws out there to be had. As far as cordless: Lithium ion batteries aren't worth a darn when it gets cold out. The regular (NiCd?) hitachi tools sold at lowes and other places have very competitive/attractive prices in the store but you will wind up paying in the field- the batteries can come off the charger and be dead again within 1 or 2 minutes and the tools; well lets just say you'll be getting a lot of warranty (or after warranty) work done. You get what you pay for. 18v Dewalt, decent tools and battery performance for the price, same could be said for Bosch and Makita. Can't comment on Panasonic saws, although their impact driver is very nice. As mentioned earlier, batt circ and recip saws are the hardest on batteries, it's important to set the circ saw depth to the minimum needed and keep the blade perfectly straight in the kerf if you want a good runtime. For making one small cut, I might grab a cordless saw, anything else (a cutout for instance), I'll be using a corded saw even if that means firing up the generator and fighting cords.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    I have cut many feet (like 100) of 1/2" plywood
    on a single battery with my Panasonic saw. And
    not having to screw with cords often saves me
    a lot of time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,136

    Default

    I'm a big fan of the 18V cordelss dewalt tools. We use the heck out of them at work, & they last years.

    I bought my wife the 4 piece set for her birthday a few years ago. She loves it.
    Dan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
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    Default

    I know B&D ain't the best, but I was buying on a budget and need one. On walmarts website tonight my package was $182.00. Cheaper in the stores than their website. I use my corded tools for most my stuff. But for small jobs, I have no complaints with my set.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  12. #12
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    Mar 2008
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    Ennis, TX USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KQ6AR View Post
    I bought my wife the 4 piece set for her birthday a few years ago. She loves it.
    Now that's a great wife!
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  13. #13
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    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
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    Default

    Which brand is actually,.. 'made in America'?

  14. #14
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbee View Post
    Which brand is actually,.. 'made in America'?
    My guess is none........ All the batteries used in tools are
    imports for sure. Only 2 rechargable battery makers that
    I'm aware of and that's Panasonic and Sanyo.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Default

    I don't have to depend on my tools to make my living so maybe I haven't tested them quite as hard as some of you others. Having said that, I'm very happy with my Ryobi One+ tools from Home Depot. I haven't had any problems and there are dozens of tools available all powered by the same battery pack. The tools all seem tough enough to hold together for awhile but most are a couple short steps behind the sate-of-the-art tools. Prices are good and Home Depot stands behind them.

    George

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KQ6AR View Post
    I bought my wife the 4 piece set for her birthday a few years ago. She loves it.
    Actually, I'd say, what a great HUSBAND!!!

    Just a thought... I've seen some (for lack of a better way to describe them) - mini circular saws. Those might be really handy for cut-outs where you don't need a 8" blade. They look a tad pricey. Here's a random link, grabbed without price shopping:
    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...P?sid=BVReview

    Someone may make a cordless model, don't know.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BenC View Post
    I'll be darned if I'm paying for a skillsaw or sawzall, catchy names but there are better reciprocating saws and circular saws out there to be had.
    Allright allright! I'll concede the too-broad of brand names as long as I never see anyone say frisbee or kleenex or any of the other common-use infringements! Does everyone truly say "facial tissue"?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Default

    I bought the Black & Decker package: drill/driver, circular saw, reciprocating saw, flashlight. It is a couple of years old. 14.4v I think. Anyway, the Drill works great though the batteries don't last as long as they did. The Circular Saw doesn't last long any more, but used to cut plywood and 1-by material all day and 2-by material well enough. These will be remidied with a new battery.
    The reciprocating saw is another issue. It has never been impressive. If I need to cut a few nails loose or maybe a couple of plastic or copper pipes or a single 4-by. Fine enough. But even with two batteries, it just seemed to sap the juice long before the other appliances.
    WayaCoyote

  19. #19
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Default

    NiCads will do that waya........... you could rebuild
    them with NiMH batteries....... All batteries get weak
    with age and non-use. But NiCads are the worst
    IMO, especially with the memory issue.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    If you're on a tight budget then I would recommend
    shopping ebay....... Get a quality unit and steer clear
    of any tool that still runs on NiCad batterys. NiMH
    are a far better choice and have come down in
    price.

    I have run Panasonic cordless tools for nearly 10 years
    on the job with great durability. I've had Porter Cable
    and DeWalt but they don't hold a candle to the Panasonic
    line.

    Voltage can be enticing but deceiving. My 15.6V Panasonic
    drills have more torque than the DeWalt 18V.
    I don't agree with ya: But I never tryed a Panasonic so can't call ya a big fiber..........

    I have owned since 1987 a cordless 12 volt Dewalt drill it still goin, goin, goin, goin, and I use it most everyday.
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

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