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  1. #1
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    Question Why is Pork Nasty???

    Why does pork turn nasty faster than beef??

    Pork gets all slimy and just plain nasty. Beef,
    even when the fat greens, never gets that
    nasty.

    I seldom buy much pork anymore, and NEVER buy
    the "reduced for quick sale pork".

    Does it have nastier organisms in the animal??

  2. #2
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    I think it has to do with the amount and placement of fat within the meat. I believe pork contains more fat (of course depending on the cut) than the same cuts of beef. And fat gets rancid easily, so it spoils quickly.

    You don't hear about aged pork, but beef has aging properties which makes it very savory. Nothing like a properly aged steak, yummm. On the other hand, pork is great smoked and cured - you don't see beef smoked and cured for many products.

    Chicken after one day is nasty to me.

    MM

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MapMan View Post
    Chicken after one day is nasty to me.

    MM
    Boy, I hear you on that too. It must be the processing as
    well.

    If you have packaged chicken that is a day past the "use by"
    date you'd better chuck it.

    I had a package of home grown (not commercial) chicken that
    I had taken out of the freezer and forgot about it in the fridge
    for nearly 2 weeks!! Yikes!! I unwrapped it to cook up for the
    dogs and wow......... not one foul odor! No slime..... the dogs
    enjoyed it anyway. With store bought that would have slid out
    of the package on it's own slimesickle.

  4. #4
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    According to one document I read, it's a couple of things that play into the spoilage rate. One being the pH of the meat the other being the processing practice allowing higher bacteria numbers. The higher the pH the quicker it spoils.

    That would hold true with most things I suppose. We pickle with acid for a reason.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  5. #5
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    Default

    Are you referring to flavor or just spoilage rate?

    I notice with flavor: with a roast cooked tender for 3 hours, the next day will have a "boarish" taste to it when re-heated. Sorta like the taste of an old deer out of the swamp.

    I'm too dutch to let meat spoil before I can cook it...

    Rick

  6. #6
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    Yes to the spoilage......... As one who cruises the meat
    counter for "reduced" product I have rarely been disappointed
    with beef. Pork??? Always a mistake to buy close dated.

  7. #7
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    Default Let us look at history.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    Why does pork turn nasty faster than beef??...Does it have nastier organisms in the animal??
    Quote Originally Posted by MapMan View Post
    ...You don't hear about aged pork...Nothing like a properly aged steak, yummm. On the other hand, pork is great smoked and cured - you don't see beef smoked and cured for many products...
    An interesting idea you have. History teaches that pork was the only meat the ancient Romans believed a health food. They believed so because they found pork the slowest meat to go bad and the easiest to preserve. Given the geography of Rome, its climate, and the fact that the Romans had no walk in coolers or freezers, I would think the ancient Romans had more practical first hand knowledge on purification than we.

    How is the pork ya’ll mentioned handled, stored, or preserved? Pork meat BTW, is the lowest meat in water content and hence the easiest to preserve since dihydrogen monoxide is a critical component in the rotting process of meat or vegetables. The reason capped honey keeps is the fact that most of that nasty dihydrogen monoxide has been removed by the bees, smart bugs them bees.

    The best Spanish hams on the market today are over 35 years old when sold, and I saw two hams on display in Stan’s Restaurant on I65 that are way older than that and none of these hams were ever frozen or refrigerated.


    Early Department of Agriculture lititure mentions the “Ham Belt”. This was a crescent shaped geographical area running North and South from about Bowling Green, Kentucky to Montgomery, Alabama and East and West from the North Carolina-Virginia coast to Texas. This area was so named because it was once the prime commercial pork production area of the early United States. Commercial pork consists of hams, (of which a hog has 4) and sides or slabs of bacon. In this area, (and else where) the first real cold snap of winter is still referred to as “hog killing weather.” Hog killing weather being cold enough to slow purification but not cold enough to freeze the meat and hence preventing it from “taking the cure” ( a strong brine and sometimes dry salt and/or sugar mixture) then covered in sacking (to discourage flies) and hung up in a smoke house for at least 4-6 weeks to cold smoke, i.e. slowly dry. These are still referred to as “Country Cured or Smoked Hams.”

    “Yum, yum shore make me yearn fer sum o dat skilit fryd hamm, red eye gravy, and a cupple dem hand squeezed soda and clabber milk biscuits, wif hand churned calf salve butter and wild honey!!!”

    Taking the cure in 19th century America also referred to going to health sanitariums or spas and lounging around in hot, or cold, mineral salts baths Roman style to recover or preserve ones health and hence your body, not just Porkie Pig parts soaking up Calcium Cloride cool-aid in oaken barrels.
    Last edited by Scrapfe; 11-16-2008 at 11:37 PM. Reason: 2 many is'es
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  8. #8
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    Scrapfe - I agree, there are some mighty fine hams out there. But, we are not talking about Spanish serrano ham, or Italian parma or prosciutto... those are cured products.

    We are talking about why those plastic wrapped packages of meat you get at the neighborhood grocery can get so nasty, so quickly. BTW, even though pork in its natural state is lower in moisture than beef, it isn't after processors inject it with a water solution.

    MM

  9. #9
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    Dad has a tradition of butchering either a cow or a pig for Christmas gifting to the family. A couple of years ago he asked me how I wanted my pig, I answered 'smoked'. He was confused because they normally only smoke the hams and bacon.

    I asked for all of it to be smoked and got it that way. I have to admit that I had never had better chops in my life. We Bohemians love chops and sauerkraut with dumplings, yum.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrapfe View Post
    Pork meat BTW, is the lowest meat in water content and hence the easiest to preserve since dihydrogen monoxide is a critical component in the rotting process of meat or vegetables. The reason capped honey keeps is the fact that most of that nasty dihydrogen monoxide has been removed by the bees, smart bugs them bees.
    Yup , that Dihydrogen Monoxide is dangerous stuff!
    Last edited by magnet-man; 11-17-2008 at 08:17 PM. Reason: fixed quote
    The bees know!
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  11. #11
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    My grandmother who lived in Oklahoma talked about how her father would kill a hog when the first northern ,first good cold front, would come down. She said she couldn't wait untill they had finished eating the lungs, heart, and liver so they could eat the ham. She also mentioned they usually only kept one ham and sold the rest. One year they cut their ham open and it had gone bad.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
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  12. #12
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    I remember the week of Thanksgiving being hog killing time back home in the mountains. We usually killed 4 or 5 a year and split em up between the family. Paw (grandfather) always got all the brains. He loved those things scrambled with eggs! I remember trying them once, they were quite tasty actually, even a buttery flavor. I could just never get past the thought of eating them.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  13. #13
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    Default You'll shoot your eye out.

    Quote Originally Posted by magnet-man View Post
    My grandmother who lived in Oklahoma talked about how her father would kill a hog when the first northern ,first good cold front, would come down. She said she couldn't wait untill they had finished eating the lungs, heart, and liver so they could eat the ham. She also mentioned they usually only kept one ham and sold the rest. One year they cut their ham open and it had gone bad.
    An old timer told me about his bleakest Christmas as a child during the Great Depression. Like your Great-granddad and his hams, his daddy had put up a little HFCS......That's Highly Fermented Corn Squeezins fer all you flatlanders. and had buried the wooden barrel in the ground to uh protect it from them T-men.

    Seems the worms had a hunger for oak barrels staves and a thirst for HFCS as well and all that high cheer had run off into the ground. No B-B gun for him that year.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

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