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Thread: Almond News

  1. #1
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    Default Almond News

    Looking good for Calf. Almond growers to keep up their corps and as such the demand for bees should be high again this year.

    Almonds Projected to Become the Number One Ingredient Nut by 2009
    Food Manufacturers Are Turning to Almonds to Enhance Global Product Pipeline




    (October 9, 2008, Paris) – Almonds continue to be the second most frequently used nut in new nut-containing food products worldwide, and if demand continues to grow at this rate, almonds will become the number one nut for global new product introductions by 2009.

    According to the Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), new almond-containing product introductions around the world grew substantially more than new food and other nut introductions in 2007 (introductions in almonds increased by 26 percent, food 14 percent, and nuts 16 percent respectively).1 This trajectory is monitored by the Almond Board of California (ABC) as a marker of success for its industry.



    ABC, which is exhibiting at this year’s SIAL show in Paris (exhibit space 4M085 in the USA pavilion), has witnessed a strong upswing in global demand in recent years. The Mintel GNPD1 highlights the upward trend of almond product introductions around the world:

    Globally, almonds accounted for 22 percent of new nut introductions in manufactured food products, a strong growth level that has remained consistent for the past five years.
    Europe led with 32 percent of new almond product introductions, a 14 percent increase over 2006.In Asia-Pacific markets, almonds play a large role particularly related to confectionery products. Japan consistently has experienced strong almond introductions over the past five years, while almond introductions in China have tripled since 2005. In India, where almonds are steeped in tradition, innovation increased by 50 percent in 2007, led by the confectionery sector. The California almond industry estimates 26 percent (or over a quarter) of new almond products from the top ten almond manufacturers are brands with a strong U.S. presence being introduced in other countries.
    “The almond industry experienced landmark years in 2006 and 2007,” said Shirley Horn, senior director of global marketing and communications for the ABC. “The Almond Board of California expects this tremendous success to continue, as almonds meet global food manufacturers’ needs for versatile, functional and value-added ingredients that appeal to consumers’ desires for taste, nutrition and indulgence.”



    In the confectionery category, 11 of the 21 countries surveyed in Europe launched more products with almonds than any other nut.1 Globally, chocolate confectionery is now a $74 billion industry.[2] According to Euromonitor, in 2006, more than 6.5 million tons of chocolate were sold worldwide, up nearly 260,000 tons from 2005.2 The total number of almond-chocolate introductions increased 237 percent from 2001 to 2006, meaning manufacturers around the world are increasingly leveraging the strong consumer appeal for almond-chocolate combinations.1 During this same timeframe, chocolate introductions increased 196 percent.1



    Horn commented, “Premiumisation is a major growth driver for confectionery products. Consumer demand for healthy, more natural foods also seems to be appealing for all food categories. Almonds are perfectly poised to tap into these trends. To reinforce the point, research1 shows that amongst European, North American, Latin American, and Middle Eastern and African manufacturers, ‘premium’ was one of the top-three claims made for almond product introductions. ‘Natural,’ and ‘no additives and/or preservatives’ also were found to be ranked high in terms of claims manufacturers made for almond product introductions.”



    Demand for almond products translates across continents, cultures and cuisines, sustaining the almond industry’s growth rate. California almonds are now responsible for the supply of more than 80 percent of the world’s almonds. Almond shipments to overseas markets increased to 866.4 million pounds in 2007/08, up 24 percent over the previous year, led by strong growth in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.3 Notably, almond exports have achieved new monthly records for the past 13 consecutive months.



    In order to meet accelerating demand for almonds, ABC actively works to provide educational resources for the food manufacturing industry and consumers on the many benefits that almonds have to offer. As part of its participation in SIAL, ABC has partnered with young talented pastry chef Yann Brys from the well-renowned French House of gastronomy DALLOYAU Paris to showcase innovative ingredient ideas and uses of almonds in chocolate, pastry and snacking categories.





    “I enjoy working with almonds as they are indulgent, healthy and versatile – they also complement the silkiness of the chocolate products I create. They embody a sense of luxury for customers,” said Yann Brys.



    To help show how food professionals can develop their own new product ideas, Yann Brys will be offering booth visitors samples of recipes that use almonds as a key ingredient. These recipes will bring to life the way almonds provide flavor dimension, value and crunch for many diverse types of eating occasions.

    ###

    The Almond Board of California administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. Established in 1950, the Board’s charge is to promote the best quality almonds, California’s largest tree nut crop. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit www.AlmondsAreIn.com.

    http://www.almondboard.com/News/pres...emNumber=29541
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  2. #2
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    Almonds

    Yes Alpha the board has done an incredible job of promoting and marketing a great product.
    That said, the pollination situation is looking ugly right now. Growers are upset about the $170+ quotes and are looking to cut costs. They appear to be waiting for panic and anxiety to set in before they start negotiating. "What's the price?" Plus there seems to be an abundance of bees coming in without contracts or history of placement. Pollination fees may actually decline in 2009.

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    Default

    Tom,

    Well, from what I am hearing the supply may not be as good as some are letting on. We have seen this before and those almond growers that don't already have a contract with a beek or broker may be out of luck and end up paying more.

    We go through this every year and it all seems to shake out. The ones that suffer the worst will be the growers in the end that waited. I have strong two deep hives and haven't had a problem with them getting jumped on yet. On the other hand talking to some of the brokers some of the hives are arriving very week and won't be making the cut for the groves as grading has tightened as prices grow. If something is even marginal we won't send it...this is why I think demand will be greater then supply...first in will get the good hives...last will get the weak or nothing at all.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

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    Default Whazzup

    Alpha couldn't argue with a thing you said and I hope you're right about it all!

    Always a shortage of good bees Tom

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    Default Almond poker

    But I am speaking to growers, other bkeeprs, pkg houses, etc., every day.

    Right now 8 fr avg bees are being offered for $145 in the Fresno Bee ( the local newspaper. )

    Lots of talk but I do not see many papers signed at this point in time.

    Growers are waiting believe me. I am quoting $150 for 8 fr average.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    We have seen this before and those almond growers that don't already have a contract with a beek or broker may be out of luck and end up paying more.

    The ones that suffer the worst will be the growers in the end that waited. .
    Ha, now that's funny, sure didn't happen that way couple years ago.

    Hives sitting around everywhere NOT being rented.

    I would be very open minded right now.

  7. #7
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    With bumper crops this year and demand growing it is a different story now.

    "About 60 percent of the U.S. honey bee supply buzzes around California almond orchards each spring for pollination. With almond bearing acreage projections of 750,000 bearing acres in 2011, the demand for pollination could require 1.7 million colonies, or 70 percent of the nation’s current honey bee supply."

    http://www.avenuevine.com/archives/003573.html

    Not sure that 70 % of the bee supply will migrate to Calf. so that is why I am saying there will be more demand then supply....I could be wrong but I doubt it.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    With bumper crops this year and demand growing it is a different story now.

    "About 60 percent of the U.S. honey bee supply buzzes around California almond orchards each spring for pollination. With almond bearing acreage projections of 750,000 bearing acres in 2011, the demand for pollination could require 1.7 million colonies, or 70 percent of the nation’s current honey bee supply."

    http://www.avenuevine.com/archives/003573.html

    Not sure that 70 % of the bee supply will migrate to Calf. so that is why I am saying there will be more demand then supply....I could be wrong but I doubt it.
    I couldn't disagree more.

    Bumper crop means nothing! Selling a bumper crop means nothing!

    "70% of bee supply will migrate to Calif" according to who??? the fact of the matter is, the data is not accurate.

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    Default

    Trying to estimate supply of bees vs nuts ha.I would rather go ice fishing on thin ice or go to reno,better odds.The least said right now is the easiest mended.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Jarrett View Post
    I couldn't disagree more.

    Bumper crop means nothing! Selling a bumper crop means nothing!

    "70% of bee supply will migrate to Calif" according to who??? the fact of the matter is, the data is not accurate.
    According to whom? I posted the link to the info why don't you take the time to read it instead of your off hand comments. I notice you didn't post anything to back up your statement.

    Take a look at the almond crops for the last two years and the projected crop for next year smart guy. The almond demand and the number of trees is growing every year.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  11. #11
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    Big Grin

    It's the SUPPLY side, is the factor, NOT the demand. The demand is set 40, 000 next year O.K. ..... Thats OLD news.

    The SUPPLY is ???? The demand is SET.

    Almonds don't just appear the following year.... like BEES do! UP DOWN...

    Alpha, hope this make sense.

  12. #12
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    Keith,

    Maybe we are looking at the same thing from different ends. Yes, there are a certain number of trees that need pollination so that number is set. However that number is greater this year then last.

    The supply of bees is what is the question, and not just bees in general but good hives. I know for a fact that the number of bees in Louisiana and Texas were affected this year and drought in other areas and flooding in others have left some hives weaker then normal. I know some beeks in Colorado that usually send colonies out have been hit with nosema and other problems so the numbers they are sending are not up to last years. I don't have info about how Calf. bees are fairing this year and maybe those numbers are up...maybe you can fill us in on those better. I can say that last year we were getting the same stories about what the prices were, too many bees available etc. but then they took um all and were asking for additionally colonies (hello, there is three feet of snow on the hives in Jan). It just seems to be a consistent "nobody knows whats going on" type of thing each year.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

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    Default Wise advice

    " Least said; easiest mended "


    That's a good one Thank you high rate

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    thanks tom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by high rate of speed View Post
    thanks tom.
    ya High rate you should know about thousands of hives not being rented.

    All these folks talking about an out come in the almonds...

  16. #16
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    Thanks keith, as you now it is no pic nick.If it was that easy bring it on,our company should as well had CCD not renting, 2000 good colonies a few years ago.speculqation and facts some should learn other than the news.THANKS KEITH.

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    2000*150=0 When roumours start flying and people have no contracts.thanks.:

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    Yea High rate, they start flapping about yeilds and selling out crops & then make the mistake of talking about pollination is going to be GREAT because of the nut sales.It just shows you why were in the boat were in. lol Hard to soar like an eagle when your surrounded by turkeys.

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    TURKEYS no BUZZARDS ya.LOL.

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    Default Bummer Dude

    hrs

    2,3? years ago my friend had 2200+ KILLER bees out of Wyo. On Thurs. the early nonpareils began to break. Those colonies still sat in the holding yard.

    We took them in without an agreed price. Crappola bees were shotcanned and removed. By dawn Mon. A<M all was done. Grower paid a fair price.

    Kinda ages you though

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