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Thread: chainsaw chains

  1. #21
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    May 2007
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    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScadsOBees View Post
    I'm looking for an education.

    I just started cutting wood, and don't do a ton of it yet, so I bought a little cheepie poulan chainsaw, 16", 34cc. So far it is working great for what I need.

    It dulls faster than what I'd like, and I notice that more expensive chainsaws have more teeth on the chain. Are the chains interchangeble? Could I just buy a different chain with more teeth and put that on?

    What is the anti-kickback feature? I'm not ready to abandon that feature just yet, but am curious what it is and does.

    Thanks, rick
    Scads -

    Basic cutters:

    Chipper (round): The most versatile cutter type. The Chipper chain is the easiest to file and will tolerate the most dirt and dust. Chipper chain cuts smoothly and is sort of an all-purpose saw chain, for most tasks.

    Chisel (square): This is the most aggressive chain cutter type. It is a square-cut design used by production logging crews and should only be used by experienced sawyers. Chisel chain requires a file that fits the square shape of the cutting edge, and therefore it is more difficult to file than other types of chain. Chisel chain also dulls very quickly when it is hits dirt. It is not recommended for brushing or limbing out logs because of the potential for kickback.

    Semichisel: A less aggressive cutter type than chisel. Unlike the square cut of the chisel, a round file is used with a file guide when filing semichisel chain. The semichisel cutter is more tolerant of dirt and dust and stays sharp longer than the other cutters.

    A low kickback chain is an option available for all three primary cutters, and allows safety for new users, or occasional users of the saws (or for anyone who wants to safely cut wood).

    In addition to the cutter types, there are characteristics of the sequences of the chain lines, as: Standard, Semi-skip or full skip chain. The cutter sequence is based primarily on bar length, and usage. Standard (most cutters per length) is used on bars less than 24", Full skip on larger bars, and semi-skip for soft or fibrous woods. The antikickback features on saw chains are based on the design of what are called tie straps, which connect between the cutters.

    MM

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScadsOBees View Post
    Are the chains interchangeble? Could I just buy a different chain with more teeth and put that on?Thanks, rick
    In addition to MM's excellent list of chain info you have to
    match the bar gauge. The groove the chain rides in matters.

    Keep that groove clean and now and then pull the bar off,
    turn it "upside down" and file off the outer edge if it has a
    burr. Rotating the bar will add life to the bar as it wears more
    on the wood side due to pressure.

    When the bar is off inspect the edges for heat discoloration and
    any fractures.

    Make sure the saw is always putting out adequate oil for
    lube.

  3. #23
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    Also Scads...........

    Little saws just don't do well with aggressive chain IMO.
    They take a lot more power to cut.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    In addition to MM's excellent list of chain info you have to
    match the bar gauge. The groove the chain rides in matters.

    Keep that groove clean and now and then pull the bar off,
    turn it "upside down" and file off the outer edge if it has a
    burr. Rotating the bar will add life to the bar as it wears more
    on the wood side due to pressure.

    When the bar is off inspect the edges for heat discoloration and
    any fractures.

    Make sure the saw is always putting out adequate oil for
    lube.
    Yes, maintenance on the bar/chain is of primary importance. The worst enemy to your chain, aside from running it into the ground or a stone, or a metal fence post , is lack of lubrication. Use chain oil formulations for the seasons - there are winter and summer blends. Check the ports on the oiler to make certain that they are clean and can deliver oil, and EVERY time you add gas, top off the oil.

    MM

  5. #25
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    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
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    Thanks for the info! It all makes good sense, even though it never occurred to me.

    Rick

  6. #26
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    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    Scads, There are differnt "pitch" and size chains too. Your bar should give you the info you need. Its usually printed near the saw side of the bar w/ the amt of links that bar takes. So get the right chain w/ the roght amt of links too!!!!
    Just be careful and you'll be fine.
    Yuo are starting out w/ a small Paulin saw whick will work for small tasks. The more aggressive chains DO take some power to get that extra bite but it may work for you. ITs only around $8 so might be worth a try?
    When and if you decide to get a bigger one I sure recomend Stihl saws.
    Mine starts every time after 3-4 pulls. I've had McCollugh, Homelite, Huskavarna, and a few others but that Stihl sure outstarts them all!!! Just an FYI and opinion.

  7. #27
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
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    riverrat....you surf the treehouse?

  8. #28
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    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by No_Bivy View Post
    riverrat....you surf the treehouse?
    nope cant say I have been there Pm me with the info

  9. #29
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    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by MapMan View Post
    Yes, maintenance on the bar/chain is of primary importance. Check the ports on the oiler to make certain that they are clean and can deliver oil, and EVERY time you add gas, top off the oil.
    MM
    I ran a guys stihl 250 the other day he said it wasnt cutting right. When he brought it to me the bar was blue I fired it up sent so many sparks out off the chain that it looked like I was cutting thru barbed wire but I had even got it into the log yet. I would say he had a major lubrication problem. So major he had ruined his bar and probly the chain. bad part was he had ran a chain I had just sharpened until it was dull the day before without stopping. Some people dont understand what the oiler is for.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    Could someone explain to me why it takes sooo many idiots like that to make the "world go round"
    Too bad he ruined a good tool! Was the oil res empty? Could he have the wrong chain on it too? Its getting a nice chill in the air. Perfect chainsaw weather I think!!!!

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