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Thread: Bread baking

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Default Bread baking

    Bread baking?

    Did someone say bread baking?

    This is what I've been toasting to have with my tea in the morning. It's fast,
    easy to make, and tastes great.

    Oatmeal Molasses Bread from bakingsheet.blogspot.com

    Oatmeal Molasses Batter Bread
    2 1/4 tsp (1 packet) active dry yeast
    1 cup warm water (110F)
    2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
    1/2 cup rolled/quick cooking oats
    3 tbsp molasses
    2 tbsp honey
    1 tsp salt

    Combine all ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer and, using the regular
    paddle attachment, beat at low speed until combined. Then, continue mixing
    for about 4 minutes.

    Grease an 8x4-inch loaf pan and spread dough into it. Cover with a piece of
    plastic wrap and let the dough rise until it reaches the top of the pan, about
    1 1/2 hours.

    Preheat the oven to 375F.

    Bake for 35 minutes, until well browned and, hollow-sounding when tapped.
    Turn out of pan and cool almost completely on a wire rack before slicing into
    thick slices with a serrated knife.

    Makes one loaf.

    If you have a strong mixer it will be somewhat like kneaded dough, but still
    nearly pourable. I have one of those over the stove microwaves with a light
    that shines down on the stovetop. If I turn on the light the inside of the
    microwave warms up perfectly for getting bread to rise.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default Use your honey for this bread - makes two loaves

    Honey oatmeal bread

    2 cups boiling water
    1/2 cup honey
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 cup uncooked rolled oats
    1 package dry yeast (for you bulk buyers of yeast like me, about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
    1/4 cup lukewarm water
    4 1/2 to 5 cups flour (your choice.. I use 2 cups whole wheat, the rest good bread flour)

    In large bowl, stir together boiling water, honey, butter, salt and rolled oats. Let stand one hour.

    In small bowl, proof the yeast in the lukewarm water. Add to the oat mixture, and stir in the flour 1 cup at a time and beat well.

    Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic (about ten minutes). Place in a greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 1 1/4 hours.

    Grease 2 (8 1/2 by 4 1/2-inch) loaf pans.

    Punch dough down and divide in half. Shape each half into a loaf and place in prepared loaf pan. Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire racks.


    Excellent!


    MM

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Wow, We've gone from knock-down drag-out fights to sharing bread recipies. We should be able to learn a lot from each other on this forum, so it should be pretty cool. Her's a good hearty bread that raises in about 15 minutes and no pre-heat needed for oven.

    2 tablespoons of active dry yeast
    1 cup of whole wheat flour
    4-5 cups white unbleached flour
    1 tsp salt
    2 cups warm water
    2 TBS sugar or honey
    corn meal

    Sprinkle corn meal on cookie sheet and set aside
    mix whole wheat flour, yeast, 2 cups white flour,salt, and sugar in large mixing bowl
    add 2 cups of warm water with honey stirred in if you're using it instead of sugar
    stir with wooden spoon
    gradually add more flour slowly until dough can be handled easily (it may not take 3 cups)
    Knead for 5 or 6 minutes
    put some olive oil in a bowl and coat the dough by turning in bowl
    cover and let set for 15 min in a warm place
    punch down, cut in half and form two loaves
    place loaves on previously coated cookie sheet
    place pan in oven
    set oven for 400 degrees and bake for 50 minutes
    bread rises as oven warms up

    you can add anything you'd like to the bread. I often add a blend of herbs

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    I guess I really get into bread making - I used to use the bread hook on a kitchen aid mixer, now I knead by hand. I get much better control over texture. And it is also therapeutic to slap dough around, especially during this election year.

    Here's a French bread. Classic French or Vienna bread only uses four ingredients (or a fifth in this case, to assist yeast in rising more rapidly). My last child remaining at home - my daughter - loves spaghetti, so I usually make some French bread when I make her favorite dinner. It makes a good "plate mopper".

    French Bread

    • 2 packages dry yeast
    • 2-1/2 cups warm water
    • 1 tsp. sugar
    • 6 cups all purpose flour
    • 1-1/2 tsp. salt

    Make sure water temperature is 110 to 115 degrees F. Place water in a large bowl and sprinkle with yeast and sugar to proof. Let stand for 5 minutes until yeast dissolves and starts to bubble. Stir in 2 cups flour and salt. Cover and let rise for 1/2 hour.

    Then gradually stir in enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead for 10 minutes. (Knead by pressing on the dough, then folding over and pressing with the heel of your hand.) Then clean the large mixing bowl, grease it (I use cooking spray), and place the dough in the bowl. Turn it in the bowl so the dough is greased (this prevents the top from cracking as it rises).

    Cover the dough and let rise at room temperature for about 2-1/2 hours, until doubled in bulk. With your fist, punch down the dough. Divide in half and place one half on a lightly floured surface.

    Using a rolling pin or pressing with your hands, to a 12x6" rectangle. Starting with the 12" side, roll up tightly. Seal seams and edges by pinching - important to seal edges, otherwise the loaf might turn out misshapen. Repeat with remaining dough.
    Grease (again, cooking spray) a cookie sheet and sprinkle with cornmeal. Place loaves on prepared sheet. Cover and let rise at room temperature until doubled, about 1 hour.

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Spray the loaves with a bit of water, then using a blade, made a few slashes across the top of each loaf. Bake at 425 degrees F for 25-30 minutes until loaves are golden brown (I also throw a small glass of water on a hot pizza stone on the bottom of my oven to get a blast of steam). Remove from cookie sheet and let cool on wire rack.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    I am an absolute cheater when it comes to bread.
    I use a Panasonic bread machine, easy, good stuff,
    and cheap as dirt.

    To save a bundle get your yeast at Sam's Club or
    Costco. 2 each 1# bricks cost like $5 and they
    keep in the freezer for years, literally. Compare
    that to a 4 ounce jar for the same $5.

    Favorite machine recipe:

    2 cups flour
    1/4 cup Red River hot cereal
    Handful of flax seed
    Handful of oat bran
    2 tbsp Veg Oil
    1 tsp salt
    1 tbsp honey
    1 cup water
    1 1/2 tsp yeast

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    I am an absolute cheater when it comes to bread.
    I use a Panasonic bread machine, easy, good stuff,
    and cheap as dirt.

    To save a bundle get your yeast at Sam's Club or
    Costco. 2 each 1# bricks cost like $5 and they
    keep in the freezer for years, literally. Compare
    that to a 4 ounce jar for the same $5.
    I bought my wife one of the Panasonic units and she used to "bake" using the machine. Put it to good use, too. But after I had to replace the paddle mixing thingy for the third time, it finally gave up, and being too cheap to buy a new unit, I went to "real" bread making. I'm making some bread as I am writing this, make 3-4 loaves per week, and really enjoy the hands-on approach. It does take some doing, as bread can turn out like a rock if you don't allow it to rise properly, or if your yeast isn't up to par. I had some bread machine stuff at a friend's the other day, and although it was bread, it wasn't the same - too fine textured, and the crust wasn't flavorful. Spoiled, I am.

    You are right on the yeast prices. I get my yeast, oils, flours and sugar, etc. down the road at a "secret" Amish store which isn't open to the general public - sort of a community store, but I am accepted in their community, I guess. One pound of Saf Instant Yeast costs $2.25, and I keep it in a jar in the freezer. Never goes bad.

    MM

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    MM...... no argument on bread machine bread being
    lower quality than hand kneaded. Not even close.

    But it beats the living heck out of store bought $3.00
    a loaf crud.

    As to the Panasonic.......... I am amazed you had a problem.
    Mines been going strong for over 5 years and I got it off
    ebay for $20. I liked it so much I bought 2 more and gave
    them to my kids (again off ebay for $20 to $35). No
    problems with their machines either. You adding stones
    or gravel for fiber???

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