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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Question Drawing Comb this time of Year?

    I just checked a hive that had been off site and notced that although it is pretty heavy with stores, several of the frames (black Pierco) are not drawn out and a few are only partially drawn.

    I replaced a few of the undrawn frames with wood and drawn wax then dropped a gallon of 2x1 syrup on them.

    Any chance they will draw more wax or will they ust use what space they have?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Benton2569; 10-27-2008 at 03:01 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    my bet is they wont draw this time of the year

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    My thoughts also....that is why I pulled the undrawn and gave them some good drawn comb and plently of juice.

    We had a nice fall flow this year and they did not do much drawing on that Pierco stuff. Who's to say they would have drawn the wax either but it sure seems to be easier for them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Default

    >Any chance they will draw more wax or will they ust use what space they have?

    Doubtful.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, GA USA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Dear all,
    Three weeks ago I put a second super on a strong hive that I am feeding. The super was undrawn, and I did not expect that they would draw it this late in the season (my first season, that is). A week ago I checked and the super was completely drawn, quite a bit filled and about 20% capped. They are taking a quart/day for the last month. Maybe I am lucky in Georgia, or maybe the hive is strong. I have not checked in the last few days. My plan is to wait till the strong hive caps the super, and then move it to my other weaker hive.
    Stavros

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Default

    In Georgia, that seems possible.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default update:

    It looks like the bees are hardly touching the syrup and the drawn comb I put in a few weeks back is still untouched. I thought that the bees would have at least taken the syrup and used it to fill the open space in the comb.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    two question benton2569...

    1) what is your approximate day time/night time temperatures?

    2) how approximate to the brood nest is the feeder?

    I noted that you were feeding 2 to 1... which I would expect (don't feed 2 to 1 myself) a hive to pick up and utilize a bit slower than 1 to 1. at this location I could likely still get some comb drawn by feeding lots of 1 to 1 with the brood nest fairly close to the feeder.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    Tecumseh,

    Day time temps have been in the mid to high 50's. Night time in 30-40.

    I have a poly hive top feeder right over the frames in question.

    Would a frame style feeder work better?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Granby, CT
    Posts
    547

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    We have had some cold weather here in CT, there is no chance you are going to have the bees draw comb, remember, comb building is in function of broad expantion and or storage of the nectar, both happen in much warmer weather.
    Bees are/getting ready for winter.
    If your hive is low on reserves you still may try to feed thick syrup on top of the cluster, make it warm.
    Puting some frames of honey is the best you can do. If you don't have them as the last resort you can put some fondant on top or granulated sugar.

    Good luck

    Gilman

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,899

    Default The definition of a box of plastic frames

    [quote=Benton2569;364100 several of the frames (black Pierco) are not drawn out and a few are only partially drawn.
    /quote]12345

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nevada County, CA
    Posts
    1,083

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    The bees can't even break their cluster at temperatures much below fifty degrees F. An inside feeder too close to the cluster will actually conduct heat away from the bees. Under the circumstances you describe I would be inclined to place a queen excluder on top of a really strong hive and put the weak hive above the excluder(with a super full of honey between the bees and the excluder if possable). That way they can benifit from the warmth of the bees below. Whatever you do, do it as fast as you can and try not to let them get too cold. They need to be mobile enough to have some movement or they can't generate any heat to warm back up. If they get to cold they can't do that, and even though they can survive for a while in a torpor, they wouldn't be likely to get through the winter that way.

    Actually if it was my hive I would just chalk it up to a learning experience and prepare to re-stock the hive next spring
    doug

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    If bees do not completely draw out the black pierco will they ever draw it out or does it just remain incompletely drawn?

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