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Thread: Garlic

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    586

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    Brooksbee,I havent put any in the ground yet. Although I havent even looked for any!!! I know a greenhouse fairly close that may have some and possibly Hummert? The ground is still way too wet to try anything. We had 5" last week and the ground was saturated before that. Hopefully no wetstuff until tuesday night and the70 degree days w/ a slight wind may dry things out enough to get a disc in and plant my covercrop and garlic then! Have you found any garlic? Do you have "Earl May" nurseries over there? They carry alot of stuff like that. I still have to dig up my horseradish

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
    Posts
    1,656

    Default garlic

    Like i!ve stated before on other threads, I have a truck farm and have several places I buy my seeds and plants.I buy most of my seed at Morgan County seed co. Barnett,Mo. phone#573-378-2655.They are very nice people to deal with.I was there in april and bought some garlic bulbs then to plant now.Is this close to you? if you call them they will send you a catalog.They carry alot of seed that make good bee forage,and sell by the pack or bulk.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
    Posts
    586

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    Thanks for the number. I dont live close to Bernett, but they are local MO so I'll try to deal /w them if I can.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

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    I just finished planting my garlic. Between 600 and 700 cloves.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
    Posts
    586

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    Randy,Sounds good, now you have time to come over to my place and plant right?lol just kiddin
    How do you you plant the large amts. of garlic? My back aches just seeing that number of times you bent over! hopefully you have a better way?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Smithsburg, Maryland
    Posts
    23

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    Zane, 600-700 cloves is only 300-350 ft of row, not a large amount. If you're looking to do this much, planting can be done without too much bending over. Dry ground, hook a log chain to a tractor or truck and drive over worked ground where you want the row. The chain will make a little furrow. Place cloves in the furrow (upright, especially important for hardnecks) and push the furrow shut around the clove. 1 inch soil on top of the cloves. Don't keep bending over, rather stay bent or get down and crawl or waddle. Sopping wet to just damp ground (keeps it's shape) use a dabble. tool handle, digging iron, waterwheel planter, or similar tool concept- whatever works. Go down the row punching holes, no need to bend over. Go back (or have someone following) pushing cloves into holes. Go back again (or third person following) pinch holes shut or cover with 1 inch dry soil. If doing more than 500 ft of row, definitely find a vegetable grower who will loan you a waterwheel transplanter with 6" spacing wheel or use your own to avoid the bending over. My opinion (and just that) don't waste your time with softnecks. Hardnecks are much more flavorful and once tried there is no going back, for you or your customers.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

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    My wife helped out. It planted about 350' as Ben said. It went pretty fast since we were planting in recently tilled soil. I planted 100' of hardneck that was some of my crop from this past season. The rest was softneck that I bought online and am growing to make garlic braids. I'll mulch it with straw within the next week or so.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aberdeen, Idaho
    Posts
    403

    Default Garlic pathogens

    Anytime we get plants; roots, bulbs, sets, or green plants, we take the chance of planting a serious pathogen. I did this 25 years ago with some daffodils from Brecks. Over the course of 10 years it spread throughout the yard. We conservativly had hundreds of daffodils and narcisus when it started. In 10 years we had none. I have not been able to determine what the pathogen was, but it was long lasting. Fortunately it only affected Daffodils. The pathogens on onions and garlic are just as bad.
    One thing I do now is to soak the bulbs in 10% chlorox for 10 minutes. Remove any old dried skins so the bulb and root zone are exposed. I even do this with potato sets unless they are from certified stock. It is a pain to do but worth the effort. There are fungicide products that you can buy too, but I like chlorox because it is none selective as to fungal and bacterial diseases. Surprisingly it does not hurt the bulbs. You can rinse roots and the green plants too, but just dip them and then rinse them off.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

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    Great tip, Dave! How long do you soak a bulb? Is it proportional to the size of the bulb?
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,129

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobie View Post
    Tradition has it that garlic should be planted on the day of the full moon in November, which would be Nov. 13.
    Hobie, thanks for that! I am going to get some bulbs from a friend and plant shortly.

    I have also heard that the stores put something on the garlic to keep them from sprouting...so I'll stick with the garlic that comes from my friend.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

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    Trouble is, in this neck of the woods, sometimes you have to shovel in order to plant that day!
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    342

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    A few others that bees love are garlic chives, nodding pink onion, and society garlic. You'll get bigger patches each year and they are all lovely in flower gardens as well as the kitchen garden. And... you can use them in cooking as you would scallions or chives.
    Buy locally, buy only humanely raised animals, eat in season, keep bees!

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