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Thread: Garlic

  1. #1
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    Default Garlic

    If you like garlic now is the time to plant it/The bees love the blooms (especially my Italian bees}

  2. #2
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    Default Garlic

    Where is a good place to get seed over here? any ideas?

  3. #3
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    Default garlic bulbs

    Seed catalogs,garden centers and I have bought the jumbo type in the produce dept. at the grocery store.Buy the cluster and break the bulbs off and plant.It dosen!t have to be the jumbo type,I just like it better.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Tradition has it that garlic should be planted on the day of the full moon in November, which would be Nov. 13.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by brooksbeefarm View Post
    I have bought the jumbo type in the produce dept. at the grocery store.Buy the cluster and break the bulbs off and plant.It dosen!t have to be the jumbo type,I just like it better.
    Just a couple of thoughts. If you plant grocery store garlic it may bring soil borne pathogens with it, that once in your soil will be there, pretty much forever (just ask the folks in Gilroy, CA). The seed producers that sell commercially are supposed to verify that their bulbs are free of such pathogens. The second problem with the grocery store variety is that unless they are a type that is suited to your particular area they may well not thrive. There are short day, long day and medium day length varieties that are used in specific geographic areas.
    The third thing is that elephant type garlic usually produces blossoms. Regular garlic rarely does.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  6. #6
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    Default

    beemandan makes a good point. Perhaps picking up garlic at a local farmer's market would solve the second problem (suitability to the area), but not necessarily the first (pathogens).

    That being said, I planted grocery store garlic with reasonable success. I didn't really mean to, they just sprouted and got tossed into the compost.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
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    Default garlic

    Beemandan,Good observation,I never thought about anything like that.I planted some in the back field along the branch about 4yrs. ago and the bees work the blooms hard.I thought I would pass it on to those who wanted a little extra for the bees to work on.Would the pathogens be in the bulbs, or the soil attached, if any to the roots of the store bought garlic?By me planting garlic along the branch,could I be spreading pathogens to other farms?Kind of scary.I didn!t think anything was forever except rocks and taxes
    Beemandan,would you post a thread on this?sounds like something we should be aware of.

  8. #8

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    My information came from a class on ag plant pathology and another class on vegetables.
    I doubt if I still have either textbook any longer. The common name for the disease I'm referring to is garlic white rot. You can easily do a web search and find everything you'd ever want to know.
    This link is just one of about 50,000 Google returns.

    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r584100511.html

    ps. although I said it stayed in the soil forever it's really closer to twenty years. please excuse the exaggeration.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  9. #9
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    Default

    can't you avoid the desease by rotating crops? like not planting alliums in the same place every year?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by randydrivesabus View Post
    can't you avoid the desease by rotating crops? like not planting alliums in the same place every year?
    sadly, no I've heard it doesnt

    Rotating just ensures that the ground won't be short of the nutrients used by these crops.

    I HAVE heard that dipping seed garlic in hot water before planting can cut down on the possibility of garlic white rot.. but I can't say for sure.

    I've only 'done' garlic for two years (this will be my third) and I've been lucky so far, knock wood!
    to bee or not to bee ~ that is the question

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by randydrivesabus View Post
    can't you avoid the desease by rotating crops? like not planting alliums in the same place every year?
    Probably, if the rotation is to plant the alliums in any single plot about once every thirty years. If you read the link I posted earlier you'd see that this particular pathogen can remain dormant in the soil for over twenty years.
    Last edited by beemandan; 10-28-2008 at 06:52 AM.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irene S View Post
    I've only 'done' garlic for two years (this will be my third) and I've been lucky so far, knock wood!
    I've been growing garlic for about a dozen years. I must confess that my original 'sets' were grocery store bulbs. I didn't know any better at the time. I was very lucky for two reasons. The first is that I apparently didn't bring in a white rot pathogen. The second is that the variety I planted does very well where I live. Just plain dumb luck.
    The garlic I plant today is all decended from those original bulbs. Each year I leave a number of plants unharvested in a 'seed stock' bed. Those are next season's stock. As long as I'm not bringing in outside sets I believe that I'm not likely to introduce any outside pathogens. I appear to have been successful.....so far.
    Good luck
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zane View Post
    Where is a good place to get seed over here? any ideas?
    The easiest thing to do is go to your market and buy some heads of garlic, separate into cloves, keeping the largest and plant.

    Its not the best garlic, but its garlic and good to eat. Keep the smaller cloves for yourself over the winter. The larger the clove, the larger the head come spring/summer.

    Right now I use that as my major seed crop for my market but also have 5 varieties that I grow for myself, mostly hard neck varieties, so I can harvest the scapes come spring. Nothing beats scape pesto.

    You need a whole lot of garlic though to keep the bees happy. Its easier to plant dandelions and clover.
    Richard
    Carriage House Farm, North Bend, Ohio

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by randydrivesabus View Post
    can't you avoid the desease by rotating crops? like not planting alliums in the same place every year?
    Rotation helps in soil fertility and pest control but diseases can persist a fair amount of time.
    Richard
    Carriage House Farm, North Bend, Ohio

  15. #15
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    Default Garlic Propagation

    Some of the garic in stores has been treated with a growth regulator so that it will not sprout for many weeks.
    Just buy it from a reliable source like Burpee's.
    it is not supposed to bloom the 1st year unless it bolts because of warm and then cool temperatures.
    You might consider planting onion sets as they seem to bolt easier.
    The photoperiod determines when the plants will bloom. Short , intermediate or long day types.
    And, get out your gopher traps!

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Durandal View Post
    The easiest thing to do is go to your market and buy some heads of garlic, separate into cloves, keeping the largest and plant.
    I give up!!!!!!
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    I give up!!!!!!

    Just because you are purchasing from a seed source does NOT mean they have been certified to be pathogen free.
    Richard
    Carriage House Farm, North Bend, Ohio

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Durandal View Post
    Just because you are purchasing from a seed source does NOT mean they have been certified to be pathogen free.
    Maybe not but I'm bettin' that the odds are better they'll be pathogen free than if you buy your 'seeds' from the grocery store produce section.
    Last edited by beemandan; 10-28-2008 at 08:44 AM.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  19. #19
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    Default Garlic

    Zane,just curious where did you buy your garlic to plant?

  20. #20
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    Default Garlic

    FTI:
    The ornamental galic has a longer blooming time.
    In mild winter areas it blooms most of the year!
    You can buy a few one gallon size containers and divide it into hundreds of individual plants.
    Yes, I know the topic was about garlic for the home use.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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