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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,511

    Default Hivastan™ Receives Environmental Protection Agency Section 18 Approval

    Had this come across my desk the other day.

    --------------
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact Information:
    Blair Ciecko
    708-655-2045
    blairc@celticchicago.com

    Hivastan™ Receives Environmental Protection Agency Section 18 Approval

    Schaumburg, IL, October 13, 2008 – Central Life Sciences, whose founders invented insect growth regulator technology more than 30 years ago, today announced that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has renewed Section 18 clearance for Hivastan™. Hivastan™, a contact miticide with a thick, pliable formulation, is a powerful weapon to help beekeepers protect their bees against Varroa mites. It is currently available in seven states: Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri, Oregon and Washington.

    “Varroa mites have plagued the beekeeping industry for decades, and unfortunately they have developed resistance to several of the previously approved control products,” explained Mark Taylor, Business Manager for Central Life Sciences. “The active ingredient in Hivastan™ is new to the beekeeping industry, which makes it a valuable tool in the battle against resistant Varroa mites.”

    Hivastan™ contains fenpyroximate, a highly effective miticide that has been formulated into an easy-to-use delivery system. During testing with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Hivastan™ was placed in hives for six weeks, providing effective Varroa control during and after treatment.

    To provide maximum control, Central Life Sciences recommends treating all infested bee colonies with Hivastan™ once a year – prior to the first honey flow in the spring or in the fall after the last honey flow.

    “Varroa mite control requires an integrated pest management approach,” said Taylor. “Given the resistance issues with currently registered products it is extremely important to follow a rotational strategy to slow down or prevent the development of resistance. Hivastan™ fits well into a rotational strategy for mite control.”

    Hivastan™ is available in 25-pound buckets containing enough product to treat 50 hives. Each treatment consists of 8 oz (225 grams) of product per hive. This is enough to treat a typical colony for six weeks, and any excess product remaining after this period should be removed from the hive.

    About Central Life Sciences
    The Professional Agriculture Division, which markets Hivastan™ and Apistan®, is part of the Central Life Sciences strategic business unit of Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ: CENT). Central Life Sciences is dedicated to creating healthier environments and making life better for people, plants and companion animals around the world. As inventors of insect growth regulator technology more than 30 years ago, the founders of Central Life Sciences pioneered biorational pest control: using the insect’s chemistry as a means to reduce pest populations. For more information on Hivistan™, visit www.CentralApiary.com or call 1-800-248-7763.

    ###

    Apistan is a registered trademark and Hivastan is a trademark of Wellmark International.
    Regards, Barry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Auger Hole, MN
    Posts
    433

    Default from Randy Oliver's website

    http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/...ask=view&id=38

    "Fenproximate is lipophilic, again meaning that it will likely accumulate in the combs. When I asked the company rep how stable it was in beeswax, he replied “very stable.” The company does not yet know whether comb contamination will be a problem, but plans to conduct further evaluations in the near future."


    sounds like to me another way to ensure contaminating your brood comb and damaging your bees and possibly opening the door to CCD etc.

    ask yourself how does poisoning your brood comb fall under a Section 18 emergency label? have we not gotten to were we are now in Bee Land by using harsh miticides and rendering most brood comb unlivable?


    my advice to hobbyists and novices is stick with apiguard or oxalic acid or formic acid or get some russian bees that can live without any mite treatment. once your brood comb is contaminated the only cure is gasoline and a match!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,191

    Big Grin

    AW dang....

    I was just going to google Fenpyroximate for a blue towl special.

    Sorry Barry, I was bored.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Mites & comb

    Well I guess the factory for Tactic is closed. Can't get Amitraz unless you stocked up. It is not lipophilic. Why can't we get an Amitraz product?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    963

    Thumbs Up Good news!

    Can't wait to evaluate it on a few pallets!
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    >>Why can't we get an Amitraz product

    We go it this fall in Canada
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Amitraz

    Hi Ian I guess you mean we got it

    Could you share about product and delivery? Thanks Tom

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Delivery

    I mean within the hive not through the mail!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Mites!

    I think that I will be getting a few bee yards out of state.
    LOL
    Ernie
    ( shop towels+)
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default It's approved to use on cotton

    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    >>Could you share about product and delivery? Thanks Tom

    Its in the familliar strip form, two strip per colony. That brings the ease of use just as Apistan and checkmite.
    It has worked very well in my hives. I had some yards over threshold, and others nearing it. It wipped the mites out. Seemed to be easy on the hives, I guess, unlike with organic acids.

    They tell me its fat soluble so it breaks down and doesnt pose as much residue risk in the wax. I am not sure with this, I am not familliar with this kind of chemistry. Perhaps somone here can elaberate on that, or perhaps comment on its accuracy.

    Its has actually saved me from having no mite control method at a time when I desperatly needed it. This fall had been unfavorable to organic treatments, and othere chemical methods were becoming useless. It has bought me another year of two of mite control.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    central fla usa
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Unless something has changed, I thought Hivastan had been pulled off the market for the time being.
    Some problem with the delivery method or something, I was told.
    Where there are fruits and nuts there are beekeepers!!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    848

    Default

    ian have you been useing the acids like formic or oxcilic?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Amitraz

    I am also still getting excellent results with it

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,222

    Default

    >ian have you been useing the acids like formic or oxcilic?


    yes, but without a whole lot of effectivness. As our local extentions officer says, organic acid treatments are to keep the hives in check, to help delay the mites growth and maybe delay treatments. They say it is very important to monitor, becasue the organic treatments are variable and dependent on so many factors. If they for some reason dont work, just as they havent this last couple of years, then youd better be on top of things in order to prevent a huge meltdown of your colony numbers.
    Everything is regional, our region makes these kind of treatments challenging
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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