Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Rhinelander wisconsin
    Posts
    143

    Question Frame end design ?

    Hey Is there a real reason to have the frame ends with the tapped look ? I made a bunch with square ends. When there all pushed together they make a "wall". I figured if the bees need to talk they can meet at the top or bottom. Do they need the space between the frames at all ??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    Wasn't the tapered end bar the major development of the Hoffman frame? I think the intention was you could push the frame straight down and the frames would be self spacing. I"m not sure of the history of it. Anyone who knows for sure care to explain?
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    I've run both kinds for several years now -- I see no differences in how the bees deal with them.

    My thought was that the Hoffman frame was a frame with End Bars of a particular width, that automatically aligned and spaced the frames when they are hanging in the hive and pushed together.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,554

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    The tapered is so the bees can travel around the ends of the bars. In a really cold winter it might matter. In a natural hive the ends are how bees move from comb to comb as the tops are attached and it's often a long way to the bottom...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Rhinelander wisconsin
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    so michael what would you recommend for in the north ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    Did a little more research and discovered that when movable frame hives started becoming popular there were two main types of frame, the Hoffman and Quinby. The Quinby frame rested on the bottom of the hive, required manual spacing and was developed by Moses Quinby. He was an influencial early beekeeper that wrote a book you can download for free on the web. The Hoffman frames hung from a groove in the top of the hive and the end bars were self spacing. Hoffman style frames won out and that's what we use today. While Hoffman frames are in use today in the UK, many people there still use frames that require spacing. They make an assortment of clips and spacers that can be added to your frames. What an unncessary mess IMO. Hoffman frames are the way to go.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,554

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    >so michael what would you recommend for in the north ?

    I have a few that are solid all the way down and they seem to do ok. But given I choice, I suppose, in my climate I prefer the cut out so they are less likely to get stuck. Mobility is an issue in a cold climate.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,988

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    The tapered is so the bees can travel around the ends of the bars.
    Wouldn't it make sense that the thicker part of the side bar would be at the bottom or both top and bottom? Judging from the way I have to drive the hive tool between the frames to separate them I would rather not have that part be wood that only splits away anyway. A metal spacer with a chamfer on the top edge to center the hive tool would be my preference.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,535

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    You could cut them off and use a staple or two on one side to get the correct spacing as well.

    Tapered sides reduce the amount of propilis as well, but my brother's bees collect an amazing amount of it, they would glue anything together.

    I think I remember some with a gap in the middle with the top and bottom full width at my Grandpa's, but that could be creative memory.

    Peter

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Maple Valley, WA
    Posts
    181

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    The tapered is so the bees can travel around the ends of the bars.
    It seemed to me that my bees always chewed a hole wherever/whenever they wanted to have an easy path to the other side. I assumed they were just too lazy to go around and that this was also why holes were placed in some plastic foundation. Googling it just now it looks like these may be "communication holes" though and not for travel?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,554

    Default Re: Frame end design ?

    >Googling it just now it looks like these may be "communication holes" though and not for travel?

    I think they mean they are used for travel when they call them "communication holes"...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads