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Thread: Carpenter Bees?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Well, no replies to my query yet. It appears my two favorite bug people over there don't post much lately. I'll keep checking.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
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    Spend a little time here....I see there are carpenter bees in all sizes shapes and colors! Personally I don't know the difference between the two. From what I can tell the carpenters have longer flatter butts, often hairless and shiney. But I'm not always so sure.

    http://bugguide.net/node/view/262/bgpage

    This fall we've found several big bumbler-types with little bumbler-types taking a piggy-back ride.

    Rick

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
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    3,741

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    The Carpenter Bees around here sound just like Hobie's. Neighbor had an awful time with them and I ended up replacing a lot of the trim on her house. They can do some terrible damage.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    Well, Hobie, it took awhile, but I was told by one poster that it is a plain average honeybee
    The one poster I am familiar with that seems to know her stuff on insect ID says it's a bumblee species. I found a site you may be interested in on bee species ID. I thought it was great.

    http://pick4.pick.uga.edu/mp/20q?guide=Bombus
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
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    2,172

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    I replaced all my fascia boards and brick molding with pvc molding. Hope those devils are breaking their teeth off when they visit now!!!
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Dragonfly, I am assuming yout typo-ed and meant "bumble bee." I would hope I would recognize a honey bee by now! Looks like a cool web site... thanks! Will have to poke around more when I have more time.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobie View Post
    Dragonfly, I am assuming yout typo-ed and meant "bumble bee." I would hope I would recognize a honey bee by now! Looks like a cool web site... thanks! Will have to poke around more when I have more time.
    No, one of the posters on there told me it was a plain old honeybee. I had to control my impulse to laugh. Seriously.
    The other (The one whom I am familiar with) is the one who said bumblebee.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Hmmm. I've apparently got the wrong species in my little white boxes.

    (Sorry! I mis-interpreted your in the first post!)
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobie View Post
    Hmmm. I've apparently got the wrong species in my little white boxes.
    Yeah me too
    I would hate to think of working a hive of our big bumblebees down here in this part of the country.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    1,933

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    The very large bumble bees are queens. Early in the year, they will be queens foraging for to supply their new nests. Late in the year they will be virgins, which will overwinter in diapause and establish new nests in the spring. Queens are the easiest ones to mistake for carpenter bees, but check the abdomen. Some queens abdomen are mostly black, like our carpenter bee, X. virginica.

    If the abdomen is smooth and shiny, it should be a carpenter bee. If it has white on its face, its a male (for the species we have here, X. virginica). Check out the hind legs too.
    http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Xylocopa
    click on the species names in the left column for photos.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
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    2,131

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    Hobie,
    I have large carpenter bees here that are as you described with shiny abdomens. They tend to hover and get defensive if you go near their holes in the boards. They are big! The pic you have looks like the smaller variety bumblebee that I have here. We have little ones and big ones. I have a nest of the smaller variety in the ground under my pines out back.

    Anyway, the best thing you can do is paint the wood. They prefer unpainted wood to drill their holes, however on occassion I have had them drill in through painted wood. They cause so much damage and you can't see it. All you see is a little hole, but the hollowed out section is amazing.

    What I do is take a piece of aluminum screen and poke it in the hole...they can't chew threw aluminum, but they do chew through caulking, etc. This traps the bees in the wood, as they can't get out and they die and the ones on the outside, can't get in to save the others in time.

    And, an old tennis or badmitten raquet works great on those that hover too close.

    My advice would be to rid yourself of them...paint and screen quickly as they cause much damage.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
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    the odor they leave in the hole attracts others so you can soon have a large colony. caulk over screen is best. good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ravenna, Ohio, USA
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    308

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    If you leave them go too long, then the woodpeckers find them and those little holes get blasted out!
    Blue Sky Bee Supply
    Quality Bee Supplies, Bees and Containers!

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    2,030

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    Yes.... I know!
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

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