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Thread: Meat Rabbits

  1. #21
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    Horse...eat horse meat. Go to an auction where they are selling them to the dog food companies and you can get them really cheap. Usually pretty lean meat, may be a little tough if it is an older animal but a good crockpot cooking will help that.

    The only problem is if your neighbors see you hanging and skinning the thing...something about it really bugs them. Also you will need room in the freezer.

    Good luck...

    BTW...remember Tonto in the the lone Ranger. Kimosabe actually means "One day I am going to eat your horse" ... no really....

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sungold View Post
    From reading this thread, it seems that people are paying approx $11./$11.50 per 50lb of feed. Roughly speaking, how many lbs of feed does it take to bring a rabbit to weight for slaughter?
    That is my question too..............

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    Horse...eat horse meat.
    Isn't it wild what people will or will not eat?? Just depends on
    the culture. Many eat cats and dogs and think eating a chicken
    is barbaric. Many cultures eat horse........... but I'll pass......

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    Isn't it wild what people will or will not eat?? Just depends on
    the culture. Many eat cats and dogs and think eating a chicken
    is barbaric. Many cultures eat horse........... but I'll pass......
    The only thing I try to avoid is "eating crow".

  5. #25
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    Default Feed requirements and feed conversion

    According to "Rabbit Production" by Mcnitt et al. 2000. "As a rule of thumb, a New Zealand White Doe and litter will consume about 100 pounds of feed from breeding to eight weeks of age. Weanling rabbits will consume from 2 to 6 ounces of feed per day, depending on their size.
    Feed conversion is the pounds of feed consumed divided by the pounds of body weight gained. It is commonly referred to as the feed:grain ratio. Weanling rabbits will consume about 3 pounds of feed per pound of gain. As a rule it will take 3.5 to 4.0 pounds of feed for a doe and litter per pound of gain of the litter."
    Incidentally alfalfa meal, whatever that is, ranges from 40% to 54% of some examples of diet formulas this book gives. Anyway using this ratio and the figure of $11.50 per 50 pound feed bag; This works out to be $0.23/pound of feed; Multiply $0.23/pound of feed by 4.0 pounds of feed per pound of weight gain gives a cost of $0.92 per pound of rabbit grown. However, then you need to multiply by 2 because 50% of the rabbit will be lost when you process it - unless you have a dog to eat bones, fur and guts. Yet at $1.84 a pound it is still low cholesterol meat you have had control over. Meat is becoming more expensive everywhere these days. I hope these figures are helpful. Adrian.

  6. #26
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    Adrian,

    Thanks, that's a very nice summary.

    Cliff

  7. #27
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    So are the hutch rabbits tastier and more tender than wild cottontails?

    Also, the "eating crow" reference mixed in with rabbits reminds me of a true story. I went rabbit hunting one time with my Dad, my half-brother and HIS cousin (but not MY cousin, which is important, as will be explained). Anyway, we shot some rabbits and then decided to break out the crow call and shoot some crows. Shooting crows is about the only thing I've ever shot just for the fun of shooting something for no reason. I've given it up, but that was then and this is now. Then, it was exciting to call in crows and blast away. We called in a bunch of crows and popped a few of them.

    Then, my Brother's cousin decides that he wants to see what crow meat tastes like. He proceeds to skin a crow, which from the looks of it is not easy. As it turns out, the skin sticks to the meat. Crow meat is the ultimate dark meat. It's nearly black. It also stinks.

    According to my brother, HIS cousin was undeterred and actually cooked and tried to eat the crow. He did not manage to swallow one bite, which he reported was the worst tasting meat he had ever tried.

    So the moral of the story, if there is one, and I'm not sure there is, is that some people may eat dogs, cats and horses, but nobody eats crows.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndvan View Post
    So are the hutch rabbits tastier and more tender than wild cottontails?................but nobody eats crows.
    From experience........ Hutch raised rabbits are much, much
    better than wild. Better flavor, and tender.

    And as to crow............ I talked to a guy that hunted them
    regularly in Pecan orchards and they love them!! Breasted
    out and on the BQ.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Quiney WI View Post
    This works out to be $0.23/pound of feed; Multiply $0.23/pound of feed by 4.0 pounds of feed per pound of weight gain gives a cost of $0.92 per pound of rabbit grown. However, then you need to multiply by 2 because 50% of the rabbit will be lost when you process it - unless you have a dog to eat bones, fur and guts. Yet at $1.84 a pound it is still low cholesterol meat you have had control over. Meat is becoming more expensive everywhere these days. I hope these figures are helpful. Adrian.
    Thanks a million Adrian......... At 92 cents a pound that is very
    comparable to store bought chicken. And way cheaper than
    lean beef.

    The dogs will get the innards.......

  10. #30
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    Unless your buying chicken "on the hoof", wouldn't the comparison be at $1.84/lb.

    Either way, I just got back from a local market (Northern New Jersey), thawed rabbit $8.99/lb. It looked very good, fresh, nice and lean but $8.99/lb Maybe that's typical, I guess I was just thinking priced more like chicken.
    Last edited by Sungold; 10-01-2008 at 06:07 PM.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sungold View Post
    Unless your buying chicken "on the hoof", wouldn't the comparison be at $1.84/lb.

    Either way, I just got back from a local market (Northern New Jersey), thawed rabbit $8.99/lb. It looked very good, fresh, nice and lean but $8.99/lb Maybe that's typical, I guess I was just thinking priced more like chicken.
    Note that the $1.84 per pound is boneless, and skinless. Boneless
    chicken is in that same price zone. Perhaps more.

  12. #32
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    We fed our rabbits baled hay(almost pure alfalfa) and dried ear corn at all times, never had any problems. Pellets were fed too, but not unlimited quantities except to nursing does. I would be comfortable drying down plain old grass clippings for bucks.

  13. #33
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    Thanks Dave....... I have a lot of alfalfa that I mow a
    couple times a year. Seems a waste to let it lay.

  14. #34
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    My brother used to raise meat rabbits. He got to where he hated to kill them. After he got out of it, a guy started a truck route that came around and picked up the live rabbits and took them to the Pel-Freeze plant.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  15. #35
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    Killing is certainly the nasty side!! I know that I will hate
    it most of all.

    We are so used to getting meat on Styrofoam trays that
    we've lost touch with the nasty side of eating meat.

  16. #36
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    If I was going to do it again, I would strongly consider a CO2 chamber for the deed. I believe an old aquarium, a plexi lid and some weather stripping would be all you need.


    http://nwco.net/0531-StepThreeLethal...ideChamber.asp

  17. #37
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    That is very interesting Dave......... but does it have any
    impact on meat quality??

  18. #38
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    This seems to be a fairly humain way to dispatch a rabbit. The video may be coverd by an overlay, Last week the overlay was not on the video.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9uFuW_Xvn0
    Last edited by Sungold; 10-05-2008 at 06:38 AM.

  19. #39
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    Dial up blues here...........

    My concern would be on what CO2 does to the meat
    product. Probably nothing, but I'd feel more comfortable
    knowing.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    That is very interesting Dave......... but does it have any
    impact on meat quality??

    I know zoos use it to kill rats and mice for their critters, and it's used to flush oxygen out of bags of shredded cheese to prevent spoilage. I have heard it CAN give off-flavors to cheese, but it takes a pretty significant level to do that.

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