Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default Quick question about Formic Acid Pads

    Are you suppose to use the inner cover when using Formic? Or do you take them out and just use top cover?
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,941

    Default

    you need to allow air space over thepad for them to work efficiently. They suggest a rim of some sort and spacers under the pads themselves
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I have the spacers under the pads. And I have the shims to keep the pad from getting mashed.
    I was just curious if the air flow from the top cover vent would make the formic not work as efficient. The DVD shows no inner being used.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    Doesn't matter much. I leave my inner covers on. Many others don't. Your choice. After the first few days, it won't matter much since your pads will have lost some of their potency.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    The DVD was very specific. It was free from Mann Lake, no inner cover for ventilation, only bottom entrance, and they duck taped the gaps inbetween the boxes. Also I don't think they used screened bottoms which I have on my hives.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    They're shooting for perfect space and, if you can do it, it's worth it. My inner covers had no notch so the ventilation is less than perfect. My first year with formic was a disaster. I think I got the colony too tight. Now, I treat like all other treatments, that being a step along the way of pest management.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIMBEE View Post
    The DVD was very specific. It was free from Mann Lake, no inner cover for ventilation, only bottom entrance, and they duck taped the gaps inbetween the boxes. Also I don't think they used screened bottoms which I have on my hives.
    Do you have a verdict on Screened bottom boards and mite away II? Do you leave them open or put in a mite tray in an attempt to close them up?
    karla

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I keep the screened bottom boards closed up for the full effect, but I did not duct tape the boxes. The bees do that with bee-glue anyway
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    Instructions say leave them open. I suspect this to be more important in warm temps.

    dickm

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dickm View Post
    Instructions say leave them open. I suspect this to be more important in warm temps.

    dickm
    NOD apiaries just told me on the phone

    Open tub outside
    CLOSE up SBB
    Open up entrance all the way
    Seal any top entrances
    Seal any cracks
    karla

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dickm View Post
    Instructions say leave them open. I suspect this to be more important in warm temps.

    dickm
    NOD apiaries just told me on the phone to CLOSE up SBB
    karla

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    As I figured, you only keep the bottom entrance open. The bees are in control of moving the formic fumes around.
    By the way the bad hive on day 3 had uncountable amounts of Varroa on the SSB The formic is working very well and I don't see piles of dead bees so I am happy
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Granby, CT
    Posts
    547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIMBEE View Post
    As I figured, you only keep the bottom entrance open. The bees are in control of moving the formic fumes around.
    By the way the bad hive on day 3 had uncountable amounts of Varroa on the SSB The formic is working very well and I don't see piles of dead bees so I am happy
    I would give that colony a some feeding after you take the FA.

    Gilman

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    755

    Default Respirator really needed for Formic Acid use in US?

    What about respirators used when first putting formic acid pad on? Seems like a requirement in the US but not in Canada. In the US they want you to use a special pesticide respirator- not just a dinky one.

    What do folks use or not?

    THANKS
    karla

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    I have a respirator but it came off pretty fast. I suggest you keep a smoker lit so you can work upwind of the hive. Rubber gloves I don't skimp on. You could contaminat your leather ones but the bees won't like them ever again.

    dickm

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,020

    Default

    I used the respirator with the pesticide & organic vapor cartridge (the one from the mite away instructions) and was glad. That is some POWERFUL stuff. I used the respirator when taking the pads off, too but that was probably not necessary.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I did not use a respirator(Don't tell on me) for my 3 hives. I just held my breath when I was opening the formic and placing it. I did not have any problems with my eyes, nose, or throat. And anyone who reads my posts knows I use nirtile latex throw away gloves for inspections.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Fruitland, WA, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Seal those hives

    According to the manufacturer the hive should be well sealed; no holes or other entrances. This would include the upper entrance on the inner cover. All of the treatments which rely on vaporization, whether thymol based or acid based, count on the bees moving air through the hive to distribute the vapors throughout the hive. Any extra holes reduces the concentration and therefore the efficacy of the treatment.

    From the mitegone website;
    FOR BEST RESULTS:
    · Bottom boards must be solid and drain-holes must be sealed.
    .
    · Top entrances and auger holes must be closed. Use carpets or plastic under wooden
    inner cover to seal the top.
    · Only colonies of the same strength and “housing” can use the same treatment.
    · The hive must be full of bees to maintain evaporating temperature and humidity.
    · Bees in clusters or four frames of bees in 2 otherwise empty boxes cannot be treated
    successfully.
    · Move weak colonies into singles or nukes.

    from the Mite-Away website;

    Seal all holes in the hive except the bottom hive entrance, which needs to be fully open for the entire duration of treatment. Entrance reducers MUST be removed to prevent excessive damage to the colonies. Treat all bee colonies in the apiary at the same time. Allow a minimum of one month between applications.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads