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Thread: queen exculders

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dolgeville, NY
    Posts
    53

    Default queen exculders

    With winter comeing fast should the queen exc be removed for winter???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default should the queen exc be removed for winter???

    I pulled my excluders and the bees are located in an avocado belt 14 miles from the Pacific Ocean. It is known for it's mild winters. However, we do get 19 degrees F every few years.
    My thoughts are to pull the excluders for winter as the heat of the cluster is conducted out by the metal and it keeps the bees natural. We use to leave them on for the eucalyptus flow to draw out foundation in the brood chamber.
    The winter cluster normaly moves up and the excluder prevent the queen from being included.
    Some almond pollination contracts state No Exluders.
    You can find a lot more information by doing a search located at the top of this page.
    Regards,
    Ernie Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Yes, pull the excluders. If the cluster moves up then the queen is dead.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,872

    Default

    yep, remove the excluders.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,780

    Default

    I pull the excluders when I pull my last super. I don't leave an empty super above an excluder going into the winter. In fact, I don't give them an empty super unless they are crowded right now (I have one hive like that....it's wall to wall bees). If they fill or partially fill a super now, I swap frames out so that they get to keep more honey in the colony or I hold the partially filled frames off the hive and feed it back should they need it in the winter.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    I'm curious why an almond pollination contract would forbid a queen excluder.

    I can't see a reason they why they would they care?
    Troy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,872

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    I'm curious why an almond pollination contract would forbid a queen excluder.

    I can't see a reason they why they would they care?
    A queen excluder limits brood area, and the more brood, the more pollen is collected to feed the brood. Brood rearing takes pollen for the lipids and protiens.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    5,041

    Default Location location location

    I run some 11 1/4" deep frame single brood chambers, and some hives store surplus honey during the winter. I leave my excluders on those hives. As it is a slow flow, they really clog up the excluders with comb.

    More recently, the bees dieoff down to a tiny cluster, or all together.

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