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Thread: moving bees

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    hebron,illinois usa
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    9

    Default moving bees

    I have 4 hives which I just started this year from packages. I have placed the hives a little to close to my garden, and have been chased out a few times by the bees. I would like to know if I could move the bees this winter about 50 yards from where they are now and what are the consequences.
    Thanks, Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Default moving bees

    You could move them now.
    They can be moved a few feet, 3-5', every day or two. Move them a little at a time so that they can orientate.
    Or, if they are strong in population you can make a drift divide so that they can be moved all at one time. (The drift divide could have been done last summer.)
    Good Luck,
    Ernie Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    I'm not sure what you mean when you say drift divide.

    Would you please explain the details of what that means?
    Troy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Fair Grove,MO,USA
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    Default Moving bees

    Do you have a friend or family member 5 miles from you that would let you put them at their place for a week or two?Then you could move them back in the location you want them.Less hassel.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    I think you could move them in the winter, but the danger is to break the cluster when it is too cold for them to regroup - you could kill a number of them and the queen might be one of the killed. So you'd want to make sure they could reform the cluster if you broke it when bumping or banging the hive during movement.

    Maybe if you timed the weather right, you could do it. It never gets cold in in FL, so I don't have the luxury of actually trying this, but if I did - this is what I'd do.

    Watch the weather reports - I'd be looking for at least one full day where the high is about 55 or 60, but where it is expected to turn colder. Screen them up after dark one night, and move them in the AM. LEAVE THEM SCREENED. It should be warm enough during the day for them to recluster if a problem, but weather is expected to be colder for the next few days. Just leave them screened in until it turns cold (at least 3 days). Then once it is cold, go open the screen, so that during the next warm spell they can go out.

    This way that can reform the cluster, and they've been held inside for long enough, that they'll lose their orientation to the old location. The cold weather will help in this regard.

    Here in FL, I'd just move them elsewhere for a week or two, and then move them back to the yard's new location. They wouldn't care a bit if I did that. If you can move them to a distant location, that is the easiest, and most foolproof.
    Troy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Greensboro, N.C.
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    Move the 3 strongest hives at dusk. Leave the weakest for one week, then move it at dusk. It will strengthen the weak one and the few left when it is moved will eventually find their home.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
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    couldn't you just move the whole hive as one piece (using one of those lifter gadgets) in the dead of winter when they wouldn't be going outside at all?

  8. #8
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    Jun 2006
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    Oxford, Kansas
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aircooled View Post
    couldn't you just move the whole hive as one piece (using one of those lifter gadgets) in the dead of winter when they wouldn't be going outside at all?

    On a cold day if you break the cluster while moving will be equal a death sentence for the hive
    Last edited by riverrat; 09-22-2008 at 11:29 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
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    Stop...you guys are killing me.

    Do what Indee says. They will find their hives...its just 50 ft. When they come out in the morning they will re-orient to their new location.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2008
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    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
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    Few feet at a time would work nicely, or wait until night fall and screen them and move them the next morning or that night. Or... wait until Nov and move them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Fresno California USA
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    Default movig em

    Do what idee says

  12. #12
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    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Do what iddee says. I've done it myself before, works great.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  13. #13
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    Apr 2008
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    Fair Grove,MO,USA
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    Default moving bees

    Michaelarch,Take my advice only in warm weather,for some reason I didn!t see that you want to do this in the winter[not reading the whole question]Sorry.I!d go with what Iddee says

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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