Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: loose wick..

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Pickens, SC, USA
    Posts
    233

    Default loose wick..

    Just finished pouring my first candle in a "candle flex" mold. When it cooled and I gently removed the candle the wick seemed to be loose. I used the right size and type wick and poured wax slowly into the mold. If I have a problem.... what most likely caused it ?

    Thanks
    charlotte

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Default

    The only time I've seen the wick loose in the center of a candle is when I happen to pull the candle from the mold too soon. Even though the outside of the candle may be at or near room temperature, the center is still very warm.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Question

    Did you prime your wick first???
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyndi View Post
    Did you prime your wick first???
    Prime a wick?
    "Where wisdom is called for, force is of little use."
    Herodotus (circa 485-425 BC), Greek Historian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Yes, priming the wick is #1 rule in candlemaking. You dip the wick into melted wax and coat it completely. Allow the wax to harden, then dip into the wax again. I find that with beeswax, once dipped is usually quite sufficient, the wax is harder and adheres nicely on the first dip. It's a good habit to get into. There are several reasons why you should do this process. The candles light more easily, they burn more reliably, it prevents moisture, and it allows the candle to set up and cure properly. Overall, it just makes a better quality candle.

    Some people never prime the hand-rolled variety of beeswax candles...I personally don't make these any longer, but it certainly made a huge difference in how these type of candles performed. However, these type of candles are really poor in comparison to a hand-dipped or poured candle - no matter what you do. Another words, IMO, hand-rolled beeswax candles are low quality, burn too fast and are not worth the price you pay for them, from a retail point of view. I quit making them and selling them for this reason.

    Good luck.
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Default

    I haven't troed candles yet, but have never heard about priming the wick. But it makes perfect sense... the dry wick would tend to absorb the wax around it. Thanks for an excellent tip, Cyndi!
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Pickens, SC, USA
    Posts
    233

    Default

    Well... I bet I removed it a bit soon and it was stick warm inside.

    I have the candle flex mold that you pull the wick thru from the bottom. Then when you remove the candle, you still have the wick threaded thru the bottom. Would I pull some extra through the mold , dip it and then pull the "waxed" wick back into the mold to the proper amt ?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    Cyndi I just learned something. I will always prime my wick before.....

    Thanks...
    "Where wisdom is called for, force is of little use."
    Herodotus (circa 485-425 BC), Greek Historian

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Default

    When I get into my candlemaking mode...I measure out all my candle wicks and spend the first several HOURS sometimes, just priming wicks. It's part of the process of making candles. I was taught to make this my habit, so I did. Talk about Discipline, LOL!!

    As for the poly flex molds....I don't thread mine the way you are talking about Charlotte because you strip all the wax off when you pull it through, and/or it's too hard to handle. I simply thread each candle from the other end with a long needle. I pre-measure and prime the wicks beforehand. Yea, it takes more time, but I like my candles. You don't have to if you don't want to though. This is just what I do and what works for me.
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Default

    We make a lot of candles and I've tried it with priming wicks and without. Frankly I didn't notice any difference. Priming wicks to go into a mold is a major pain -- especially when you're feeding into the mold off a spool. To me it's not worth the effort. So you might try it both ways, burn the candles, and compare.

    But I do think wicks light better with some wax on the tip. I take a small brush and dab a little wax on the wick when the candle is removed from the mold. Once the candle is lit the first time, the end is soaked with molten wax. It also prevents the wick from coming unraveled through handling and transporting which looks really bad.

    The exception is when making votives or tealights when the wick MUST be stiff to feed through the hole. But that's the only time I dip wicks.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    sorta on topic- can the candlemakers here recommend a good beginers(me) book? i have never made a candle and would like to learn. thanks,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    We don't prime wicks either, except for teas or votives and for those we buy primed pretabs. I think priming the wick is not worth the trouble or time, if one is trying to make a profit of it especially. We have not noticed any difference. IMO, the wick primes itself sufficiently with the melted wax as it burns.
    Sheri

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Default

    I've tested my candles both ways and priming does in fact make a difference. All the books and teachers teach this very important aspect in candlemaking. Of course, I learned this when I wasn't trying to make a profit......and I learned it when I wanted to make the perfect candle. But, when you add the profit factor in...I guess quality becomes something else I suppose??
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    Hi Cyndi,
    I started out reading the books and priming my wicks also, but quickly gave it up as not necessary. This is one of those issues where pragmatists and purists disagree. IMO, while there may be a difference, it is slight, and may only be noticable if comparing two identical candles one with primed wick and one not. And yes, turning a profit may be a factor. If you did a time study to determine your actual costs of production, priming the wicks is not justified IMO, for any added benefit versus the additional cost of production.
    I think, like most aspects in life, there are happy mediums. I have not had complaints that my candles aren't primed or that they are not high quality and they are priced such that folks can afford them and I still make a profit.
    Sheri

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    19

    Default Dip after pouring

    We keep our wax warm while the candle cools, (or warm some up again the next day) so that when we pull the candle out of the mold, we can dip the candle wick into the melted wax to make the wick more likely to light and burn well. inside the candle, the wick is full of wax, so you really only need to worry about the tip.

    Then a little trim with the scissors and you've got a good looking candle!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads