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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Sacramento, CA
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    51

    Default Is there risk of disease?

    I noticed a bad smell every time there is a laying worker in the hive or when the queen lays drones, noticed as well some dead larva in these cases (some of them are halfway eaten). Sometimes stinks very badly. Is there OK to reuse the frames, place them in another hive or there is risk of disease? I would guess, that the drone larva dies being undernourished. Thanks.
    Last edited by happybees; 09-17-2008 at 01:06 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    Default

    I get mix messages in your description. first off (but likely not so important to you question) does the hive have a laying worker... if yes, you should see singular cells with multiple eggs.

    a bad smell can point towards foul brood disease.

    cannibalization of larvae usually points to starvation.

    if the latter? you could reuse the frames directly. if the former? I would process the wax and sanitize the frames before reusing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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    276

    Default

    Happybees: I'm just curious, how can you tell when your queen is laying drones? The only time I know there is drone brood is after the cells have been capped. They are bigger and higher than regular cells.
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss you`ll be among the stars!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    Default

    The brood is scattered on the frame, of different ages, capped cells are of different height, some of them are higher (sticking out), others are very low, in some cells can be found dead larva.
    This would be a picture of a laying worker (besides multiple eggs etc). The same picture I saw in many queen right hives (besides multiple eggs in one cell) that had new introduced queens. The dead larva was no sticky, so I assumed thatís not foulbrood. I presumed that bees in a hopeless situation only with unfertile eggs donít feed the larva accordingly, larva dies and produces a bad smell. It is also true that in July they didnít much food, the frames were almost empty, now they get plenty of syrup.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    Default

    happy bee writes:
    some of them are higher (sticking out), others are very low

    tecumseh: sounds like??? a description of drones vs workers cells (capped).

    happybee writes:
    This would be a picture of a laying worker (besides multiple eggs etc).

    tecumseh: a laying worker will almost invarible have multiple eggs in a single cell.

    sounds more like a failing queen. if so??? the existing bees likely have no resources (newly hatched worker larvae) to produce a queen.

    if yes??? then the hive is likely doomed.. it may not even be possible (especially if the situation you describe has been going on for some time... which it appear it has) to introduce a mated queen.

    happybee writes:
    The dead larva was no sticky

    tecumseh: I assume you are talking about the toothpick roopy test. this of course only applies to american foul brood.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
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    1,514

    Default

    A healthy hive will feed ALL of their larvae (unless autumn and they are kicking out drones). If they don't want the drones, they will remove the eggs.

    The only reasons (that I can think of) to have dead larvae in cells would be
    1. they are starving and too weak to maintain the hive or
    2. there was a large brood kill for some reason, such as freezing, and this usually only happens when they are pretty weak or you just put on a treatment such as apiguard
    3. If laying worker, then I'd assume they are to the point where the workforce is dwindling and can't maintain the hive. At that point I think it is hopelss.

    Either way, if you are in a SHB area, this is a recipe for an infestation.

    Make sure that the bees are only in an area small enough for them to defend and use, and make sure that they are receiving plenty of syrup.

    Rick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hampton Roads, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    56

    Question Question?

    So if it is a weak queenless hive with a laying worker, can you put a frame of mixed brood, from another hive, in there for them to raise a new queen? Or will they not do that because of the laying worker? I guess its probably too late in the season for that also though, huh?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default Afb?

    Quote Originally Posted by happybees View Post
    I noticed a bad smell...noticed as well some dead larva...(some of them are halfway eaten)...Sometimes stinks very badly...Thanks.
    You might follow this link and download the information from the University of Georgia bee program. There are good pictures and descriptions of what AFB looks and smells like, and the pictures are scalable.

    http://www.ent.uga.edu/bees/Disorder..._Foulbrood.htm

    Hope this works.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

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