Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Location

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Question Location

    I have had bees for three years now.

    My hives have never produced more than 40 lbs each. Often less than that. This year I was on top of pest and swarm control, the weather was pretty darn good and still a modest harvest.

    Could it be that my location is what it is and I should only expect modest results?

    There are a few bee keepers in the area and they seem to do about the same (which makes me feel better). My area is mostly woods, fields, suburbia and very small farms - no big stands of any nectar producing crop (natural or other wise) that I know of.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    My first year. Started with 2 hives have 3 now. 3rd is a built up new hive from a 1 frame deep split off that is building for winter.(no honey from this hive)
    2 strong hives which have made about 90 pounds each so far, and the mediums are full again and will be capped in a week or 2.
    I figure about another 60lbs at least for fall harvest. things look good for winter execpt one hive battling Varroa. I am sugar dusting once a week.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Granby, CT
    Posts
    550

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIMBEE View Post
    My first year. Started with 2 hives have 3 now. 3rd is a built up new hive from a 1 frame deep split off that is building for winter.(no honey from this hive)
    2 strong hives which have made about 90 pounds each so far, and the mediums are full again and will be capped in a week or 2.
    I figure about another 60lbs at least for fall harvest. things look good for winter execpt one hive battling Varroa. I am sugar dusting once a week.
    So you decided against the formic A?
    I hope they do good.
    Gilman

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    40 lbs. does seem a bit low, but it is very possible that that is what your area is capable of producing. Location, more than any other single factor, is what determines how much honey your bees will make. Even a few miles can make a huge difference in your honey crop.
    I have had yards that made over 250 lbs. per colony and yards that made 50 lbs. per colony, both in the same years, but they were 10 or so miles apart.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bleta12 View Post
    So you decided against the formic A?
    I hope they do good.
    Gilman
    Yes no chemicals, just sugar dusting. I hope they do well also, if not I will be seeing you again this spring.
    Olny one hive is bad with Varroa.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Default

    two things come to mind...

    location being numero uno... go to the county extension office and consult the soil map for your area. my guess is those places with the highest soil fertility will also consistently produce the largest honey crop.

    secondly... a bit of feeding 30 to 45 days ahead of the main flow will put more hands at work collecting whatever crop might be available.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    The Golden Rod is going crazy around here so I may actually do a little better this year but not by much.

    I have noticed that a lot of the big nectar prodcing trees and plants like Black Locust, Sumac and Bamboo are no where in my area. Maybe the thing to do is place some hives in different locations and see what happens. At least I will have something to compare against.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    326

    Default

    I guess the problem is that like you say you don't have nectar producing trees in your area. One tree is worth acres of small honey plants....

    When I go around I always keep a bag of seeds as someone recommended me some time ago. I throw the seeds here and there where I see "free" spot. Hope in next couple of years I will improve my nectar sources around my land.

    Maybe you should consider a bag of Phacelia, clover seeds in your pocket
    Sig

  9. #9

    Default

    Hi Beenovice

    First, I think you use TBH. Langs are better honey producers in my experience and opinion. Second people in USA and Canada have much more space available for their bees. By that I mean that Europe is much denser populated and agriculture covers much more space than untouched areas. And probably less hives per acre - this is just guessing. So from I hear there is no chance that I could get 50kg from a stationary hive. That's a great result here even if you follow he nectar flow.

    I've had similar experiences like you. So my solution is to move hives follow, nectar flows. I think that is the only way you can make some relative decent crop here. This was my first year following all the flows available in my area (canola, black locust, sunflower, goldenrod). And the difference is significant. Also I suggest to you to keep only strong hives. Its better to have few really strong hives than many more weak ones.
    Good luck!
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    326

    Default

    Sasha indeed I have 5 top bar hives and 2 regular ( Like Langs but with slightly different frame - AŽ dimensions - not AŽ hives, just frames...box stacking is needed )
    Since this was the first year for all 7 hives I didn't take any honey.

    Yes I just go wow when I see how much honey they produce in US. Twice as much as we can ever produce here in europe.
    Anyway migratory beekeeping is ou of the question for me so I try and make available land around me more bee friendly. I also plant phacelia wherever I can and considering what a great honey plant that is ( nectar and pollen ) I think over the years I will improve area around me considerably

    Good luck to you too Sasha.
    Sig

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads