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Thread: Chunk Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
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    Default Chunk Honey

    We cut out a couple of pounds of comb because so many neighbors are requesting "honey with the comb in it." Without any forethought, we just cut a slab that would fit the mouth of our jar and then topped the jar off to the regular weight. Lo and Behold, a chunk of honey comb will float in that golden syrup. So too will any loose beeswax. And careless transportation will produce even more floating flakes to foil the presentation.

    What do we need to do to improve the appearance and presentation when we do this again?
    Is there a trick to cutting and handling the comb to reduce damage?
    Thanks
    WayaCoyote

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Default

    I've not done chunk honey before and will be interested in hearing any of the replies to your questions, as I have been planning on making some chunk honey bottles up here in a month or so.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  3. #3
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    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
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    Default

    I am not an Xpert here but for show at the Fair I use wide mouth pint jars and I make a template to fit the jar then cut the comb and let it drain, the comb just fits inside te jar and it is all the way to the top so it dont float dont fill the jar with to HOT or warm honey so you dont erode the comb.

    One class at the Fair is a 2 1/2 pound jar and for that I use different shapes and to bee able to handle it I cut drain it and freez it so it is solid enough to handle. I am sure there a lot more folks out there that have better ways.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  4. #4
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    Mar 2007
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    Default

    You could also go to the ross rounds.

  5. #5
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    Sep 2006
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    I heard of this method, but never tried it before:
    Heat an empty glass jar, and when you cut the comb, place it in the hot glass jar so that the comb slighty melts just a little bit when it touches the hot glass jar. That way, the comb gets "glued" to the bottom of the jar. Then you can fill the rest with honey.

  6. #6
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    samak
    That sounds like it would bee worth a try.

    doc25
    RRs and chunk are two different things, I have RRs but when you are ready to market you have over a dollar in packageing!
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Payne, OK, USA
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    Default

    When I bottle comb honey, I cut the comb from the frame, then slice it (sharp paring knife) into pieces that will fit into the jar, pick it up (carefully) with my fingers, slide it into the jar, and then fill it with room temperature honey. The comb will float to the top, but I guess that I'm carefull enough to not get too many particles in the jar. If you do get floating wax particles just pick them out with a knife. Each year I sell more comb honey than I did the year before.
    23 Springs Honey Farm ~ The Bees Know

  8. #8
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    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    Default

    Mine is the best seller too. I just do it as carefully as I can and though there may be a few small wax pieces in there I've never had anyone complain.

    I've even sealed some up where the bees did not cap all of it. No one seems to mind that either, though I agree that is not the best presentation.
    Troy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
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    I use a new fish filet knife to cut the combs. It's long, thin and very sharp. I wonder if a piano wire device (like a large cheese slicer) would work even better.

    If all the cells are filled, the top of the comb will only float to the surface of the honey. If a significant number of cells are empty, it will push the entire piece of comb up out of the jar. I try to avoid these when I can, but they seem to sell just as well. They just don't look as good in the jar.

    The loose beeswax that floats on the honey are the "crumbs" from cutting with a dull knife or picked up from a messy cutting board. Wiping the work surface between frames and using a very sharp knife should cut down significantly on the loose wax.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Default

    Great advice GASteve. Thanks.
    WayaCoyote

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