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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Humans.

    The temps in the hive are all fine and good, the natural temperature. We're talking about artificial heat, added by HUMANS. The legal definition, from what I've read, is any heat added by humans.

    -Mel.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melisseus View Post
    The temps in the hive are all fine and good, the natural temperature. We're talking about artificial heat, added by HUMANS. The legal definition, from what I've read, is any heat added by humans.

    -Mel.
    Then you best store your honey outside where the temps are natural. If you heat your home in the winter-time to anything above the NATURAL OUTDOOR TEMPS then your honey can no longer be considered raw/organic? Is that was you are suggesting? Please!!!!
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    Do NOT touch my honey! Your hands are almost 100F!!

    That is silly, really, because then there is NO raw honey, since I need to heat my house all winter. Frozen honey just doesn't spread on toast the same way.

    If you are relying on honey for your enzymes your diet is in bad shape. Honey is a sweetener, a treat, not a basic food substance. If you are eating that much honey that the enzymes make a difference, then you are going to have tooth decay.

    Rick

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Shed.

    Who said I kept honey in the house? I bottle all my honey as soon as I extract it and store it outside in an UNHEATED tool shed. Life partner says the jars in the house takes up too much room anyway, and I agree. It crystallize, but it's still got all those natural live enzymes, not to mention the crazy good smell it has that I find goes away even with the littlest heating. I stopped liquifying it after I noticed this. It just tastes/smells better and is more sacred, gives everyone better vibes.


    -Mel.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Question

    Gotta love those vibes!!! I know that's why I keep bees and eat honey!
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    To each his own. If all thought the same, there would never be a disagreement. You do it your way, I'll do it mine. We will both be right.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,452

    Default

    >>RAW HONEY: honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling, or straining without adding heat.
    >>It crystallize, but it's still got all those natural live enzymes, not to mention the crazy good smell it has that I find goes away even with the littlest heating.

    The subject is hot room heating, not inline heating. I dont really know of anyone that keeps their hot room hotter than 30 degrees C. That temp isnt going to change the consistancy of your honey. It does get better than 30 degrees temperature natually outside you know.

    Now with inline heating, there is more of a flash heat involved, but not enough to do any damage to the honey itself, ensymes and all. there and again its not exceeding a temp of 35 degrees
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iddee View Post
    To each his own. If all thought the same, there would never be a disagreement. You do it your way, I'll do it mine. We will both be right.
    Well there you have it. If I kept my honey in the shed she'd kill me. Oh...not that honey!

    Seriously, around here my shed gets probably up to 130 inside or more in the summer in the sun. Maybe you have a better ventilated shed, but mine is like a solar oven.

    I like my raw honey to be liquid. You can use your definitions, I'll use mine.

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