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Thread: Beelining

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
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    Lightbulb Beelining

    Here's a nice site about it using gps: http://sites.google.com/site/beelining/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Jacksonville, North Carolina
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    Does anyone know where to find a beelining box (3 chamber) to purchase or the plans to build one? Thanks.

  3. #3
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    PM Jim Fischer. His dad makes a very serviceable three chambered one.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    I second that motion. I bought one of Jim's dad's beelining boxes and have had great fun with it.
    Troy

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Blanco, Texas
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    I have been wanting to try this for some time now. I have a good quality lensatic compass that is easy to use for getting the azimuth of the beeline. I just wish I had a good enough GPS to plug in and use the data "on the fly" Great site!!
    Live Removals & Local Honey in Austin, Texas. www.austinbees.com

  6. #6
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    Oct 2005
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    mt. airy, surry county, nc
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    i know i keep referring to this book, but it has a section and plans for a beelining box. john vivian's "KEEPING BEES". it is on amazon

    http://www.amazon.com/Keeping-Bees-J...9794057&sr=8-6
    "Any fool can learn, the trick is to understand - Einstein"

  7. #7
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    Orlando, FL
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    Another good book that I have enjoyed is this one by Winchester Press: http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Wild-B...9862454&sr=8-7

    Give it a look.
    Troy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
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    1,674

    Default GPS in beelining

    Quote Originally Posted by danno1800 View Post
    Here's a nice site about it using gps: http://sites.google.com/site/beelining/
    Danno1800s’ post regarding bee lining was interesting.:confused: However, if you are familiar with the territory I see no use for a GPS unit or even a compass except to prevent the beekeeper from getting lost and the state police or the rescue squad to locate the locater. When I was a wee lad sitting on my grandmother’s knee, she told me how she and her father (my g-g-dad) bee lined in the 19th century.

    Equipment: one horse and buggy or saddle mule, one pair of hiking boots (In Alabama if weather good shoes optional), one wide brimmed hat to shade your head and eyes from overhead Sun, one used lard pail or syrup bucket with nail holes in lid for use as a dinner bucket (called lunch box elsewhere), depending on your religious affiliation, one mason jar filed with well water for drinking or one stone jug filled with spring water for mixing, and two good eyes.

    Drive buggy or ride mule to creek ford. Get out of buggy or dismount mule and study gravel in roadway along the streambed. When bees are seen landing on gravel watch closely. Bees always need water in warm weather with or without a nectar flow. Bees will stay at water for only as long as it takes them to drink their fill, bees don’t flit from creek to creek like they do with flowers. When the bee leaves the creek bank she will make a beeline for her nest. Watch the bee carefully, especially when she flies between trees etc.

    Mark place where you last saw bee. Go to this spot plus a little further and stop. Turn your head and body so you can watch in the direction of the stream. When the next bee flies over on the same heading and altitude repeat the previous step. Repeat, repeat, and repeat etc. ad nostrum. I currently live close to the Bee Line Highway.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  9. #9
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    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
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    Big Grin Srapfe that was great!

    I really enjoyed reading it...thanks for the post! -Danno

  10. #10
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    Western Pennsylvania
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrapfe View Post
    Danno1800s’ post regarding bee lining was interesting.:confused: However, if you are familiar with the territory I see no use for a GPS unit or even a compass

    Perhaps a GPS would be of great value.

    I occasionally use one when bee coursing. While coursing one line, I may notice a course in another direction. I can then, mark the coordinates and direction as a way point in my GPS memory and retrieve them later and plot them on a topographical map. With the accumulation of courses, the intersecting lines will eventually reveal the locations of other nests. A GPS can also be used to tell you which bee lines are from known souces so you can ignore those.


    A compass can be of great value also. I recently established a single bee course from a feeding station, and by finding a landmark off in the distance, continued along that line using a compass for about .5 miles and ended up less than 25 yards from the nest location from a single course. You might be surprised how one can drift off course in woodlands without the use of a compass.

    Joe
    http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/H...neybeeArticles

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brevard county Fla
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    46

    Default Beelining and leaving ferals

    Has anyone thought of a way to perhaps find and keep a feral queen
    while leaving eggs and brood for the feral to requeen itself ?
    Taking only the feral queen or eggs and let the feral hive stay feral ?
    I am really interested in beelining, but would also like to keep the ferals feral.
    The saddest day of my beekeeping was when I learned that unregressed swarms
    would probably only live a year or to in the wild due to mites.
    Regards
    Mike

  12. #12
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    Western Pennsylvania
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesfarm View Post
    Has anyone thought of a way to perhaps find and keep a feral queen
    while leaving eggs and brood for the feral to requeen itself ?
    This can be done by setting out traps for swarms. The parent colony stays, and you get the cast.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesfarm View Post
    The saddest day of my beekeeping was when I learned that unregressed swarms
    would probably only live a year or to in the wild due to mites.
    Mike
    Where did you hear that?
    Allow me to cheer you up.
    Ferals here are thriving at 5.2 mm which by most standards is considered non regressed.
    I’m sure mites are here, but I have yet to see a mite this season in any feral or in my colonies, suggesting varroa levels are very low.

    Here you see that 5.1 mm is said to be natural size for most of the USA, with cold climates up to 5.2
    So it would be un-natural to force northern climate bees to a smaller size suitable for hot climates.
    http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/therm_map.htm

    A single mechanism like small cell does not make for good varroa control.

    Originally lacking mechanisms for varroa tolerance, smaller cell size may have been an effective as <stop gap> solution to prevent extinction of the species. But as mechanisms evolve, the need for the bee to rely only on a single mechanisms is lessened, allowing the bee to return to a more natural size of around 5.1 mm

    Here are six known mechanisms for varroa tolerance. You can see that small cell is only part of the equation, NOT the entire equation. Even at 5.2 mm there is a contribution made towards varroa control, with other contributions coming from developed traits of resistance.
    *Length of phoretic period *Low mite fertility *Brood attractiveness *Length of post-capping *Grooming behavior *Hygienic behavior

    Joe
    http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/H...eybeeArticles/

  13. #13
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Nicely stated Joe.

  14. #14
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    Oct 2005
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    mt. airy, surry county, nc
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesfarm View Post
    The saddest day of my beekeeping was when I learned that unregressed swarms
    would probably only live a year or to in the wild due to mites.
    Regards
    Mike
    ya know, i've been wondering about that. i have been told that feral could not last long due to mites. but i seen one the other day that the folks said has been there longer than they have (5 years) and it looks like its been there a lot longer. and my neighbor tells me of on in brown summit, NC that he knows has been there over 15 years. is this common or flukes? or could it be swarms taken up in good places repeatedly
    "Any fool can learn, the trick is to understand - Einstein"

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