Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Springfield New Jersey
    Posts
    119

    Default collapsed hive CCD?

    Had a hive collapse. It was totally void of bees and was being robbed out nothing in it at all but some pollen. Don"t think it was CCD but am going to have some frames tested by the state apiarist. From what I know about CCD usually there is a queen remaining with a few bees left and also that robbers won"t go near it. Thinking that the queen just kicked and they were not able to make emergency cells and died off but will have it looked at just to be sure.Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    your thinking seems clear. testing may or may not provide additional information.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    I would be surprised if any state apiarist is willing to test samples of frames sent in for CCD confirmation. What exactly is that test anyways? What results confirm CCD?

    Long before t-mites, v-mites, this disease or that disease, there was something called absconding. It was done on a rather low level for the most part. But hives are known to abscond for many reasons. Bad apiary location, pests, etc. And prior to CCD of the past couple years, I personally thought that absconding was higher in recent (20 years) compared to documented rates or what was suggested prior to all the issues involving bees prior to the time before that.

    From what you suggest, I see no reason to think it was CCD. I have breeding nuc yards with between 50 and a hundred nucs. I lose a nuc it seems every year from each yard, especially towards late summer, where the bees just get up and leave. Sometimes there is even brood left behind. But I do not think that 1 nuc out of 100 is what CCD has been known to do. Usually CCD would be 95 out of 100 being effected over a short period of time. And with no other nucs or hives being effected, I have no reason to think its not just classic absconding for whatever reason.

    Seems prior to CCD, every hive lost was due to v-mites. That was a joke, as many were attributed to poor beekeeping. Now it seems, many lose hives to CCD. And I'm not suggesting poor beekeeping, just that its the flavor of the day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    mt. airy, surry county, nc
    Posts
    217

    Default

    i agree with bjornbee. i have been wondering what was the difference in ccd and "normal" loss. a couple of things i noticed on the 60 minutes expo. was that it was a large % of the apiary lost and that there was brood, honey, and pollen left. and i think that it was mentioned that the other bees would not touch the hive
    "Any fool can learn, the trick is to understand - Einstein"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    In SHB territory, late summer absconding is an issue. If the beetle population gets too high, even a strong hive will sometimes abscond rather than try to deal with the beetles. Out of 85 hives, I have had at least one double deep strong hive abscond in the last two summers leaving behind 100lbs or more of stores.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,135

    Default

    To echo Bjorn's post, somewhat. It sound to me like you probably had a colony that went queenless for some reason, maybe it is diseased, or somehow became weak enough for neighboring colonies to start robbing it.

    Very few dead colonies are CCD related. Of the 30% mortality last year, only 10 or those 30% were CCD related or suspect, according to the Apiary Inspectors of America. What caused the other 20%?

    Early CCD reports were that the CCD colonies didn't get robbed. Take that into consideration too.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Randolph County, Indiana
    Posts
    694

    Default

    I agree, CCD will probably not effect just one hive. However, I think that CCD has mostly run its course, and we may see a very steap decline in verfied reports. If this is a virus, most virial infections will run their course just like the common flu or cold, then disappear for a while. If its not a virus, we're screwed and it will keep happening. The fact that it happened in 35 states all in one year suggest a virus that was spread via migratory beekeeping, then effected smaller beeks through queen breeders or contact with migratory hives. I hope my suspicions are not wrong.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Springfield New Jersey
    Posts
    119

    Default ccd

    Don't think it was CCD just having the frames tested for afb or anything else that might have knocked them out. As far as small hive beetles and absconding because of them no beetles here. The hive swarmed at least once maybe two times,maybe one last time leaving the remainder to abscond not sure. Could have split this hive twice was very strong but I don't have much room and didn't have extra equipment for that here in suburban/urban N.J. I have gotten calls for swarms in the past few weeks they seemed to have swarmed again late so maybe they all took off with that.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads