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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default maybe the good old days were good

    It has been a long since I have been around honeybees in any caretaker capacity. I do not remember any of the old beeks talking about anything except foul brood and wax moths. I seem to remember that they though AFB and EFB were one and the same. A lot has happened in 40 plus years, and all of it seems bad. Where once we only had wax moths and foul brood, now we have AFB, EFB, nosema, tracheal mites, sack brood, chalk brood, stone brood, varroa mites, chronic bee paralysis, Israeli bee paralysis, other bee paralysis, black queen cell virus, small hive beetles and how CCD. I apologize to any bee pathogen I omitted. Makes you wonder about the statement that the good old days were not that good.

    I see a lot of equipment in catalogs that has me scratching my head. I understand the reasons for using reversible top covers, and migratory top covers and flat top covers its about logistics. I have seen pictures of hives of local beeks who use these before mentioned covers. My questions are, can you use a flat, migratory, or any other top besides a telescoping top cover year round and the reasons. Also if one uses a flat top cover what about an inner top cover, is one needed?

    The TTC, if I understand right, was designed to minimize condensation on the hive roof during cold winters. Is the flat top cover suitable for my climatic conditions or must I use a TTC? If one uses a flat top cover will you have enough ventilation up draft? What about drilling a hole in the top box and screening it over or leaving it open for a top entrance during the flow? How about sliding a flat top cover over enough to make an 1/16 to 1/8 of an inch crack between the top super and the bottom of the top cover to help cure the honey or vent other moist warm air? I realize that the telescoping cover comes off easy because it is not usually glued down by the tenants. Will I create mean bees by repeatedly popping a propolised flat cover off?

    Your answers are welcome
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    scrap iron ask:
    My questions are, can you use a flat, migratory, or any other top besides a telescoping top cover year round and the reasons. Also if one uses a flat top cover what about an inner top cover, is one needed?

    tecumseh: at your location yes (it is not cold enough and confinement is not long enough at your location during the winter to generated problems from moisture accumulation that turns to ice forming above the cluster) and no an inner cover is not needed. the real critical concern is the distance between the bottom surface of the top cover and the top of the frames. especially with the arrival of the shb too little space will create a natural habitat for those little beasty. also (as I think you suggest?) insufficient space will also make it quite likely that these top covers are glued down everywhere which will make removal more difficult.

    then scrap iron writes:
    If one uses a flat top cover will you have enough ventilation up draft? What about drilling a hole in the top box and screening it over or leaving it open for a top entrance during the flow? How about sliding a flat top cover over enough to make an 1/16 to 1/8 of an inch crack between the top super and the bottom of the top cover to help cure the honey or vent other moist warm air? I realize that the telescoping cover comes off easy because it is not usually glued down by the tenants. Will I create mean bees by repeatedly popping a propolised flat cover off?

    tecumseh replies:
    ventilation is a concern as is the space previously mentioned. I simple build a rim onto my flat migratory covers (somewhat like the little lip on one side of an inner cover) and allow a notch (top entrance/vent) on one side. some folks have drilled holes in top bodies for vents/entraces.

    I personally would not wish to repeatly sweat bullets to pull off a top cover. and yes that pullin' and bangin' will not make the girls disposition any better.

    hope that helps...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    los angeles, ca
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Hey Buddy
    I got into beekeeping again in 1999 after being a beekeeper in the 70's.I had the same thoughts very complicated very dis-heartning.So in 2001 I found Michael Bush's web page.I do the same thing now as the 70's except I do small and natural cell and small cell.No treatments of any kind I'm haveing fun as a beekeeper now and I'm haveing success
    kirkobeeo
    I like bugs

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