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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Default The Blue Shop Towel Method for Tracheal Mite Control in Honey Bees

    What do you think? Is this still in practice?
    The Blue Shop Towel Method
    for Tracheal Mite Control in Honey Bees
    http://www.honeybeeworld.com/diary/articles/blue.htm

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
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    Big Grin

    "The blue light special"

    Is that goverment approved...... of course not, that's why it works.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    Wink Blue shop towels

    I have recently seen some hives that looked a lot like the photo.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Default

    Nice article, thanks much
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  5. #5
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    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Default Bst

    Hello Allen & All,
    I believe it is written up by the USDA but not sure the location. What Blane
    is saying is you can always use less then label but not more than label.
    I
    use approved food grade menthol. George is using a essential oil. The
    peppermint spirits might work but are not approved method. I don't know the
    rules for Canada.
    I use the 1 lb.(by weight) menthol to canola oil and haven't had dead brood.
    I did get dead brood and bees driven from the hives with the 2 lb. mix from
    the article. I do not measure the amount of canola and only top off the 3
    lb. coffee can. I do everything exactly like the 1 lb. formula presented in
    the ABJ article. In your case making a larger batch you might have to guess
    at the amount of canola.
    I have always used the second dose. My thoughts were to keep the treatment
    on as long as menthol would normally be on the hive. I have never treated
    only once and then checked. Maybe I should have. I find many of the problems
    associated with various treatments we use are not successful because we do
    not follow instructions and timing. Resistance to Terramycin could have
    developed because beekeepers were not appling properly. Dose one week. Dose
    ten days later.
    Timming is very important in using chemicals or antibiotics.
    Bob
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Default Jim Amrine, at West Virginia University

    Jim Amrine, at West Virginia University.
    This is his writeup, in part. The last I saw, he was testing the amounts
    and also the effect on Varroa.
    Bill Truesdell
    Bath, ME

    1): Measure and mix the following:
    Place two standard packs of menthol crystals (3.4 oz. or 100 grams) in
    an 8-oz. (118.3 cc) measuring cup, and then add canola oil to fill.
    Microwave for 4 minutes at 50% power. Check to see that all crystals
    dissolved—if not, microwave for an additional minute at 50% power. Must
    be used while warm otherwise crystals will reform.
    2): Add to paper towels:
    Remove 30 paper towels from one roll; fold in half and stack. Put stack
    of paper towels into a large zip-lock bag and add 1 cup of warm
    menthol-canola.
    Zip the bag shut then squeeze the towels in the bag until all towels are
    evenly saturated. If one end of towels is somewhat dry, turn the bag
    sideways putting dry end down—in about 10 minutes, all will be evenly
    saturated.
    Thus, one cup of menthol-canola mix will treat 30 paper towels—using 2
    towels per colony, this will treat 15 colonies.
    Towels can be stored at room temperature indefinitely if the bag is
    zipped closed.
    3): Add to colonies:
    Do not add to colonies while a honey flow is on. Place one paper towel
    over the top bars of each brood chamber. Best time to treat is
    September. (Tracheal mites are usually not a problem from May to
    September, so no menthol needs to be used until the time that mites
    begin to build up in late August or September). Colonies can be treated
    anytime during the winter when temperatures rise above about 45 F. We
    recommend this treatment whenever tracheal mites are found; additional
    treatments can be made in December, January and February. The bees will
    chew up the paper towels and discard them at the entrance in 3-4 days
    (or longer in winter). This mix caused no harm to our bees but
    definitely reduced or eliminated the tracheal mites.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    9,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BEES4U View Post
    In your case making a larger batch you might have to guess at the amount of canola.
    You make my point quite obvious. This is the norm I'm sorry to say.
    Regards, Barry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Jarrett View Post
    of course not, that's why it works.
    "Works". And 3 towels "work" even better. You see, with treatments like these, the individual mixes up their brew and applies it how ever they see fit. Saying a home brew treatment "works" has no real meaning in hard data. It may achieve a goal, but you have no way of knowing all the other things it's achieving that aren't desired.
    Regards, Barry

  9. #9
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    Dec 2006
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    Amador County, Calif
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    Big Grin

    I knew if I got out the down rigger something would happen.

  10. #10
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    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    I have given up on worrying about such items awhile back, and have no reason any longer for such treatments. But I do use paper towels for testing various hives for selection of queens.

  11. #11
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    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default

    So the unknown of home brews don't concern you Keith?
    Regards, Barry

  12. #12
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    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Jarrett View Post
    I knew if I got out the down rigger something would happen.
    What are you saying? Or is this some code for an insider jab at something or someone? This isn't one of those secrets is it?

  13. #13
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    Dec 2006
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    Amador County, Calif
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    "Works". And 3 towels "work" even better.
    Barry,
    You could use that arguement about anything.

    Put five check mite strip in if two don't work or double the TM rate if the foul brood doesn't clean up. I could go on & on. And we won't even talk about China.

  14. #14
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    Oct 2007
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    Default And I'll say again......

    My 0.02.
    And I'll say again......To use chemicals that are not approved or standard within the bee industry, and then sell off nucs, hives and bees, to consumers, should be something to stop.

    Can someone provide me with a list of approved chemicals that are standard and approved.
    I do not think that we have one.
    That is why I do the web searches to see what scientist are doing so that they can provide us the conclusion,s of their work.

    The ABJ had a good article about the recipiants of 2008 SARE $ and I found that to be interesting.
    Ernie
    Last edited by BEES4U; 08-23-2008 at 05:58 PM. Reason: spelling
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    2,479

    Default Edb

    Anybody else out there remember Ethylene DiBromide?

    Perfectly legal, go down to Dadants for 5gal.

    .

  16. #16
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Default

    my sometimes annual treatment insnt with a shop towel, but rather with a piece of cardboard,
    works very well, and is recomended by our provincial apiarists
    not sure how it is seen by the USDA
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Question You could buy Ethylene DiBromide

    You are saying that you can purchase EDB at a bee supplier.
    And, that's without an Agric. I.D. #
    I can not buy Mite-a-way 11 without a permit.
    The tolerance for EDB in honey is very low and if your hobey contaminates a batch you get to pay for it's disposal!

    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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