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Thread: Milkweed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    200

    Default Milkweed

    I planted some milkweed seeds two years ago. Last year the plants were small and getting their roots established. This year they are full size but none of them put out flowers. I have them in many different locations in my yard. How old do they have to be before they bloom?

  2. #2
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    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    It may depend on the variety. I have a couple of "wild" milkweed varieties that bloom the first year. Even in this 100+ degree weather, they are flowering.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Erie, PA
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    Default

    Here, my younger milkweed seem to take a few years to establish before flowering. I've never kept track of how long, though. I'm guessing you'll see blooms next summer. Once they get a good root system going, you'll be in business in these northern latitudes.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    If I had seen this thread earlier, I would of posted the recent photos here instead.

    I just really started getting into some of the native flowers. Stuff like milkweed, Joepye (sp?), etc. But much of this stuff grows in some low laying areas of my property. I think I read that milkweed likes moist areas also. Not sure about maturity.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    586

    Default

    Do the girls like the milkweed?
    I try to keep mine around for the monarch butterfly. There is a decline of them they say too. I saw a site recomending we put up a 10' sq pc of dirt for milkweed if possible. I have it in many areas and mow around instead of over it.
    btw I like this forum thx

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
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    Default

    I planted a yellow flowering variety from seed this spring. Its in bloom, very nice looking, but the bees aren't paying much attention to it.

    Dan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
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    Default

    Here's a link to a couple of photos I took a few weeks ago when the bees were in the milkweed. The flowers smell so good.
    http://s182.photobucket.com/albums/x...0bee%20Photos/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
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    I have hundreds of milkweed plants near one of my bee yards. Can I save the seeds from the pods and plant elsewhere. I think I'll do a search on Google and if I can, I'll plant some seeds in the spring.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffzhear View Post
    I have hundreds of milkweed plants near one of my bee yards. Can I save the seeds from the pods and plant elsewhere.
    Yes, you should be able to. Wild varieties of milkweed appear to reseed easily. When you want to pick the seed pods, just make sure they are dry-looking and the stem just below the pod is turning brown.

    The varieties that grow wild on my property are antelope horns and green milkweed. The bees work both varieties. And they grow in dry hot conditions as well as moist conditions. Some of the varieties prefer wet environments.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  10. #10
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    May 2008
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    Concord, CA
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    Hi,
    Most varieties of milkweed seed require cold or freezing temps to germinate. You might want to winter the seed in you're garage.

    I believe a couple of the California varieties don't require it.

    Dan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    berkshire county MA
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    Default

    You may be able to harvest the seeds when the pods dry and scatter now for germination next spring

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by berkshire bee View Post
    You may be able to harvest the seeds when the pods dry and scatter now for germination next spring
    Yep, that's what nature does, and that's what I would do.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Toledo, Washington, USA
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    64

    Default

    Move out of the sticks boys, milkweed brings wax moths....

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
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    tedstruk-"milkweed brings wax moths.... "
    how and why?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    berkshire county MA
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    Default

    We have lots of milkweed and while there are wax moths around, I haven't had any problems with them in my backyard hives

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Wax moths don't typically invade an otherwise healthy hive. At least that's what I have seen here.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

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