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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1
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    Default Recipes

    Anyone have some good Mead recipes?

    I think I have found some honey locally.
    Since my 1st year girls are still building comb, they get their whole batch this first year.

    I have wild blackberries, strawberries, plums and elderberries out in the field I can incorporate into the batch.
    I've made lots of Beer(ales) but not mead yet. I have the equipment but not sure if I need some nutrients or anything else? I live close to Kraus who has lots of winemaking items so getting stuff shouldn't bee hard.
    Do you start off in buckets as primary fermenters or always stick to glass?
    We may start off w/2, 5 gal batches and only have 2 carboys but I have plenty of plastic buckets. What do you use(if any) for clarifying? I use irish moss for beer. Whats prime ferment temp(depends on the yeast some I know)
    Someone recomended corn sugar to carbonate? why not honey? after all its mead right? either way I have corn sugar also.
    I've tried non carbonated meads and have found I'm not a "dry" fan too much but maybe if it had an essence of some fruit in it. I'd like to carbonate a batch for sure

    Anyway any recipes to try out would be apprecitaed!!!

    Swobee- I'd love to get your apricot mead recipe if you ever found one you liked? I hope to have a good batch next year if I'm not out in Colorado again!!!!!

  2. #2
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    Just freeze & bring those bothersome blackberries and other fruit by on your way elk hunting! I'd do you the favor of saving you some work!! The recipe I have for apricot is very basic - fruit, honey, pectic acid, yeast. It's fermenting along nicely under air lock. I'll have a bottle of regular mead for you if you want to stop by in Oct.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zane View Post
    I have the equipment but not sure if I need some nutrients or anything else?
    Do you start off in buckets as primary fermenters or always stick to glass?
    What do you use(if any) for clarifying? I use irish moss for beer. Whats prime ferment temp (depends on the yeast some I know)
    Someone recomended corn sugar to carbonate? why not honey? after all its mead right? either way I have corn sugar also.
    I've tried non carbonated meads and have found I'm not a "dry" fan too much but maybe if it had an essence of some fruit in it. I'd like to carbonate a batch for sure
    You likely won't need nutrients for a mead made with fruits. I usually wait to add things like noots or energizer if there's a stuck ferment of something similar.

    Buckets are fine for primary, and are great if you'll do a secondary with the fruit. Avoid making a fruity primary if you can; the cap is a hassle and many of the aromas from the fruit get scrubbed out by devlolving CO2. After the vigor of fermentation slows, get it into glass for any prolonged storage/conditioning.

    There is one two-part clarifying agent that works for 97% of meads: time and gravity . For stubborn haze or hurried meads, any number of finings work. Or try chillproofing it.

    Corn sugar is easy to measure, is largely sterile, and has a known sugar content by weight allowing you to sparkle exactly as much as you want (barely pettillant to champagne-like). Honey's sugars can vary a tiny bit, contain osmophilic yeasts, and must be dissolved first.

    A good all-purpose nuclear bedtime story fermentation temp is around 65.

    Carbonation is really a seperate issue and character than dryness/sweetness, though the sparkle does lighten the feeling on the tongue. And the carbonic acid has a flavor of its own. But one can have a very dry sparkling mead or a very sweet but sparkling mead. Though sweet and sparkling is difficult to do without kegging, pasteurizing bottles or other advanced techniques. The yeast didn't read your recipe, so if they can wake up enough to eat your priming sugars they'll happily keep eating your residual sweetness in the mead and you can get overcarbonation (frustrating and even messy) up to bottle grenades (frustrating, exciting and divorce-inducing if not actively maiming ).

    An din terms of recipes, lots of old threads have recipes or read the Intro to Meadmaking stickied thread. Either way (you make a recipe or we help come up with one) we'll need to know how sweet or dry you want the finished mead, how much alcohol, and whether you'll use fruit. The Intro has an (I think) important section on recipe formulation that can help get a mazer started.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Limestone Co, Alabama
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    Angry

    [QUOTE=Zane;343657]Anyone have some good Mead recipes?


    I have wild blackberries, strawberries, plums and elderberries out in the field I can incorporate into the batch.
    I've made lots of Beer(ales) but not mead yet. I have the equipment but not sure if I need some nutrients or anything else?

    This isn’t exactly mead but I think you will like it.
    5 gallons of filtered tap water plus 2 quarts.
    5 quarts ripe elderberries
    5 pounds of chopped red raisins
    4-5 pounds of sugar or enough honey to raise the specific gravity to 1.065 - 1.085
    Juice of one lemon (OPTIONAL)
    Yeast or a yeast starter culture in a sterile pint or quart jar.

    Your elderberries should not be mashed pressed or in any way crushed. Elderberry seeds are very bitter Steep your ripe elderberries in hot (not boiling) water for about 30 minutes. Gently stir your berries as they steep just long enough to get a good rendering of the color and tannic flavor of the elderberries. When the skins of the elderberries are well dimpled they have been is hot soak long enough. Strain out elderberries and discard keeping the water they were steeped in. No tannic acid needed, and since you used grapes (raisins) no yeast fertilizer is needed for the must. Furthermore, since you boiled all of your water no sulfides etc, are needed to sterilize your must. Use only one quart berries for each gallon of mead/wine you wish to make. Also the stems of elderberries are bitter and very unpleasant. Pick your elderberries when the berries are plump, the seed heads droop, and the stalk portion of the seed head turns red.

    Now for the trick. Obtain a large plastic Afro hair pick. The ones with the clenched fist Black Power salute work best. Use the pick to gently comb or rake the berries from the stalk (A little like brushing bees off a frame). If a berry comes off with a long stem (say ½ inch or longer), hand pluck the stem. Do not wear the new clothes your wife just bought you to wear to her family reunion, elderberry juice stains. I would recommend you boil your water in 1 to 2 gallon batches. Run the raisins through a food processor and add to one of these pots of boiling water until the water returns to a boil.

    Use a primary fermented I like a small (about 8 to 11 gallons) new plastic garbage can like the metal ones popular in the sixties. Toss everything in (except the yeast) cap tightly with the lid and once the temperature returns to about eighty degrees F, add the yeast and stir. Keep lidded but re-stir one or twice a day to break up the fruit cap (raisins). Any scum that rises skim off with the spoon.

    I would recommend a large wooden spoon or a plastic one that looks similar. A good practice is to sterilize the spoon before and after using. Once fermentation starts work 7 to ten days in primary fermenter and strain into an air locked carboloy. Discard spent raisins.

    Let stand and age 30-60 days or until most bubbling ceases.
    Rack into clean carboloy and reattach air lock and let age/work 90 days. Re-rack and let age 6 months under airlock. Bottle. Makes a dry red wine that goes well with well seasoned Italian dishes etc. Very much like Italian Chianti. While in glass keep wine out of the light and keep where the temperature is no higher than 75. Enjoy
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2008
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    Cameron, MO
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    Default Recipes

    Thanks folks for the info.
    I was wondering afterwards about the fruit addition. 2ndary it is!
    Does wine like a hard or soft water? I have gypsum to add to harden it if needed, but my water though very sweet is pretty hard too!
    Swobee, I dont have plans to drive through in Oct. Choosing to fly over(thank goodness for flight bennies)to get my peaches. Keeping my costs down to $40a bushell for peaches I do plan in driving through in early Dec. Thanks for the offer though!

    Brewcat, do you work at or have a "Brew"ery? I'd like to visit it if so.

    Thanks for the recipe links. I was kinda hoping for some good home tried versions but will wait for more info or just try the links or books.

    Scrapfe, interesting recipe and I will try that one. I plan on expanding my grapes more and should have some fruiting next year. I might get some grapes from the neighbors to try this(why buy raisins if I can make them!!).

    So far the Meads I've tried where good but I dont LOVE the dry ones(except in a bubbly). Being a rookie at this too I'd probably like the fruitier, sweet ones best! Time will tell
    Thanks again

  7. #7
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    Scrapfe, interesting recipe and I will try that one. I plan on expanding my grapes more and should have some fruiting next year.

    Ihave never tried to make my own rasins since I live in a humid climate. I would suspect that it will be a daunting task. Good luck.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  8. #8
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    Default Recipes?

    Raisins= 1part grape + 1 dehydrator = raisins!!! right???

    I worked as a produce kid in school. I would buy all the left over grapes from the boxes we sold them in. I'd take them home and dehydrate them all the time. They were great.
    unless raisins have the grapes sulfated or something?

    What do you call your drink Scrapfe?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zane View Post

    Brewcat, do you work at or have a "Brew"ery? I'd like to visit it if so.
    Not any more. Well, not one I get paid for . I'm a homebrewer originally who also managed a wine and beermaking store for a few years. I had some offers to brew pro, but (luckily I think) I always elected to keep it as a hobby and teaching others. Wearing rubber boots all day for CIP regimens and hoofing sacks of grain were disenchanting enough. But being a slave to that one big-selling recipe over and over and over, having a bean-counter telling me that "that would taste just as good with a couple fewer buckets of raspberries/grains of paradise/spruce tips/"whatever, and especially not having quite the freedom to experiment the way we can as home brewers/mazers/vintners. If I want to make my house mild ale with munich malt, American hops and some turbinado sugar because that's what makes it perfect, and I want to make it even though everyone else wants an 11% IIPA, then I'm making it. And loving it .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  10. #10
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    Default mead recipe

    Ha I understand that completly!!! Having some big shot change "my recipe's" would not work for any of us I imagine. An 11% mild ale? hmm

    And I also understand peoples "perfect" mead recipes are sacred. I was just hoping for some nice tried and true recipes that "I" can modify to make "my" perfect mead recipe.

    Oh well

    I do like to visit different micro breweries and Colorado has a bunch of fun ones. I like Ft Collins, Idaho Springs, Dillon, Glenwood, Grand Jct, Durango and Steamboat for places to sample. They all have nice tasty and a wide variety of thing new to try

  11. #11
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    Well give us some more info: % alcohol, dry sweet or in between, and we can dial in some recommendations for you.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Recipes

    If your looking for a nice honey ale I have brewed this one a few times

    4 lbs Extra Light Dry Malt Extract
    3 lbs Fireweed Honey
    1/2 lb Honey Malt

    1 1/2 oz Cascade Hops 60 mins
    1/2 oz Cascade Hops 1 min

    Wyeast 1056 American Ale

    OG 1.055
    FG 1.006
    6.3 %

    Prime 3/4 cup Corn Sugar


    Add cracked Honey Malt to 1 1/2 gals of cold water and bring to boil. When the boiling starts, remove the grain. Add the Extra Light Dry Malt Extract and Fireweed Honey then bring to a boil again. Add 1 1/2 oz Cascade Hops. Boil for 60 mins. Add 1/2 oz of Cascade Hops and boil for 1 min. Sparge the hops with cold water then add the wort to the fermenter with cold water to make 5 gals. Add yeast when the temp reaches 70º. Ferment at 65º for 5 days or until fermentation slows. Rack to a secondary fermenter. Let it age 2 weeks in secondary, then bottle or keg. For bottling, use 1 1/4 cup of dry malt extract boiled with 2 cups of water added in the bottling bucket

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