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Thread: Earwigs...ew!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Default Earwigs...ew!

    I pulled the tray out of my SBB yesterday and it was just writhing with earwigs. An absolutely revolting sight.

    Does any one know if these are detrimental to the bees? Why are they in there? How do I keep them out?

    I have not gone back with gear yet to see if there is any effect inside the hive itself.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    Earwigs...I hate them.

    They are mostly benign. Sometimes they will eat delicate little new plants. Sometimes they will eat delicate big plants. Like marigolds, the bane of insects, earwigs will eat them right up.

    THey will hide out during the day in any warm/moist/dark spot. Like the tray of a SBB. Or around the edges of a telescoping cover. Or even on the inner cover if it isn't patrolled well by the bees. Or in your bathroom or under your bed. I'll turn over logs now and then and it will be writhing with earwigs.

    The biggest problem with earwigs is the 'yuck' factor. Nasty, smelly, creepy little things. That live all over the place.

    You can control them with poisons. But if you have enough poison to control the earwigs, not only will the earwigs be dead, but so will you and every other living creature within 1 mile.

    If there was a nuclear holocaust, the roaches wouldn't stand a chance. The earwigs, however, would not only survive, but thrive because their nasty little pinchers would mutate to 4 feet long.

    But sometime I'll have enough time to tell you how I really feel about them. -r

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Tip of the Thumb, Michigan
    Posts
    676

    Default

    Wow! I'm guessing Scads don't like earwigs. What do you think?

    Ditto on the eww factor. But, the hint they're giving you here is that you've got a condition within the hive that makes it not only warm and dark, but moist too! Right now, it may just make it harder for the bees to cure the honey they're putting up, but in the winter, it may lead to a more terminal condition.

    I'd increase the ventilation. Both by opening the screened bottom board, and maybe by propping the top cover a bit, also. With the removal of moist air, and the addition of air flow, your earwig problem should fix itself.

    DS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Default

    I got into cultivating carnivorous plants specifically to be able to feed earwigs to them and then wring my hands, chuckling to myself while the evil little creeps are digested alive over a few day's time. Mwaah aaahhhhh aahhhhhhh!

    But that's just me.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    mineral county,Montana USA
    Posts
    805

    Default

    i have not seen many earwigs around,but last week i made some of the homemade yellowjacket traps out of folgers coffee cans.the wasps dont seem to want to go into the dark traps but there are a ton of dead earwigs floating around.my new patented earwig traps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Default

    The big "Ew" factor for me is memories of finding them as a kid in the folds of the cloth of a hammock up at the end where it gets narrow. And then wondering why they call them EARwigs and looking at those pincers. Ick! Ick! Ick!

    I keep telling myself they must be good for something.

    I will try to increase ventilation. It has been humid as all get-out here lately, and this hive is in a shady corner, so it may be a bit moist. I will have to suit up and peek to make sure nothing more sinister is going on in there. And maybe buy some Folgers.

    Thanks, everyone.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    It's interesting, but I have noticed a significant increase in earwigs. I would say it's a 75 percent increase over the numbers I have seen on the inside covers of my hives from previous years. The same hives, the same ventilation...and it's in multiple yards.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile A very successful method to get rid of earwigs is to

    Here is my web search:

    http://www.ghorganics.com/page9.html#Earwigs:

    Earwigs:
    For earwigs we carry: Diatomaceous Earth, Orange Guard, Rotenone/Pyrethrum Spray

    Earwigs in general can be considered an ally in the garden as they will eat aphids, insect larvae, snails, and other slow moving bugs. and other pests at night as they are nocturnal. One truly good function of the insect is they eat the eggs of the codling moth which is a serious problem with apple trees. When you have an over population of earwigs they can become a nuisance. Generally they will feed on your marigolds and they really go for clematis vines, dahlias, delphiniums, pansies and chrysanthemums. They cause the most trouble June through October.

    A favored control method is spreading diatomaceous earth where they are apt to crawl. Make applications in late spring about a week apart, and treat the soil around the foundations of houses, along walks, fences, and around trees. Botanical insecticides should be used as spot treatments or crack and crevice sprays.
    One possible control in dealing with earwigs is to mix insecticide soap with isopropyl alcohol and spray the infested area every two to three days for two weeks. To make this spray add 1 tablespoon of the alcohol to each quart of insecticide soap.
    Another method is to trap earwigs in pieces of old hose or rolled up newspapers. Check these during day and shake the insects into a bucket of soapy water.
    A very successful method to get rid of earwigs is to take a shallow, straight-sided container and fill it half full with vegetable oil. Clean out the bodies every day and you may reuse the oil as often as you like. We have found that this works particularly well in a greenhouse situation.
    Here's another trap mixture: 1 tbsp vegetable oil, 1 tbsp molasses, 1 tbsp dry yeast, 8 ozs water. Mix all the ingredients well and place in a small plastic container (like a cottage cheese container). Bury the container to ground level. Clean it out as needed.
    Elm Leaf Beetle:
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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