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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Altamont, NY
    Posts
    146

    Default What would you do - old extractor

    Hello everyone!

    I recently acquired a motorized extractor made by A. I. Root. It was free so I couldn't pass it up. However, there are a couple of problems with it that I would like some advice on.

    1. It is galvanized. I have been reading that this is/could be a problem. I do plan on cleaning it very well and coat it with camcoat. This may be all for naught...

    2. Probably the worst problem to have - and maybe the demise of the extractor? It had a mouse nest it it. So the entire thing smells like mouse, well, you know. We've emptied it and will be pouring bleach in it tomorrow as well as washing it multiple times.

    Is this a major problem or will this be salvageable? Do you see any reason I shouldn't use it after cleaning it multiple times and painting it with camcoat?

    Finally, I do have another option. We also have a 2 frame Jr. Bench extractor that has a hand crank. I was able to remove the handle to try and fit the pulley from the Root extractor on it. It fit perfectly. I'm thinking of hooking the motor up to this extractor as it is stainless steel and looks brand new. The only problem I thought I'd have with it is that the Jr. Bench has plastic gears. Anyone think this would be a problem? I just don't want to have the motor strip the plastic gears.

    As always, thanks for your feedback!
    Keith

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Keith, if something gets jammed during extracting with the motor it most likely will break off some teeth. I think by a good cleaning with hot water and bleach you should be able to get it very clean and get rid of the smell as well as anything else lingering.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,699

    Default

    if you are painting the inside, make sure it is a food grade paint. (do not know what camcoat is).
    The galvanized can make the honey come out a dark puky color in the beginning. That honey will be lost.
    We had this problem even with multiple cleanings of the extractor. We lost about 1/2 of a 5 gallon pail.
    But we just cleaned and bleached, did not paint. After that year we bought a used stainless steel one...much easier to take care of.
    'luck

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    Keith, sounds like you have a good plan to me. I had at least one extractor where mice made nests on top of it...and it stunk to high heaven. I sanitized it with clorox and water and soap and water, and aired it out.

    As for the galvanized and coating with the camcoat, that's what I would do with a galvanized extractor if I had one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    I would likely... clean that old jewel up with some hot soapy water, rince out and set out into the sun to dry, change out the bearing, slap on a coat of camcoat and see if I could get another 50 years of use out of the beast.

    ps... a variable speed drill makes an excellent power source for an old extractor. on my little extractor (a llittle wonder converted to a 10 frame radial) it is connected directly (chuck up) to the shaft so there are no gear s to strip.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    I used a 8 frame galvanized model for my first several years. It had a bottom mounted motor with two belts, a break using leather disks, and was at least 50 years old. It was a beast but did the job.

    Your description was about the same as mine. But I cleaned it up, coated with camcoat, and it worked fine. And who can argue with free! You should not have any problems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Altamont, NY
    Posts
    146

    Default

    Yes, that sounds pretty much like the one I have. The only difference is that what I thought would be a 6 or 8 frame extractor turned out to be a 2 frame! It is a beast coming in at around 100 lbs with the stand.

    I like the fact that the gearing is cast iron. As they always say, they don't make them like they used to!
    I'll be cleaning it today - or at least bleaching the crap out of it to try and remove the stench that is in it. Hopefully after a few washings and airing it out I can salvage it.

    I also was given an electric uncapper. Maxant I believe. Just like the extractor, this thing needs some cleaning too. But the little bit that I did clean made it look brand new.

    One other thing. Every newer model extractor I have seen has a lid. This one does not. Any reason why I should have a lid for this? I guess if the frames are flying around inside I am thinking that honey may shoot out over the top. Also, I would think it would keep out insects that may be attracted to the honey.

    Thanks for the replies!
    Keith


    Quote Originally Posted by BjornBee View Post
    I used a 8 frame galvanized model for my first several years. It had a bottom mounted motor with two belts, a break using leather disks, and was at least 50 years old. It was a beast but did the job.

    Your description was about the same as mine. But I cleaned it up, coated with camcoat, and it worked fine. And who can argue with free! You should not have any problems.
    Last edited by stoweski; 08-05-2008 at 05:54 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Keith, just extract inside the garage or house. You won't have a problem. And anything in the honey will be strained anyways.

    Honey will not fly out.

    After your done and its clean for the season, just cover it over with a huge plastic garbage bag or some plastic and keep tight with a bungee.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    "Camcote" is the product you all are referring to. Betterbee carried it in their 2007 catalog on page 60 -- I can't find the product in most of my 2008 catalogs but you may have to ask for it.

    Camcote is a FDA, food-approved epoxy paint for galvanized metal.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    Clean it, coat it and use it. We're all a little too paranoid sometimes.....
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Suffolk NY
    Posts
    200

    Default

    I have the same extractor. Put on 2 coats of camcote & turned down the main shaft to accomodate my 1/2 inch drill. Worked like a charm & the honey tastes great throughout. The only problem I've seen was some flaking of the camcote after 3 uses. Next season I'll have to sand it down again & recoat.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    I'd say it is worth a try...give it a good cleaning...maybe a couple cleanings, just to convince yourself that you got it all cleaned...then the camcoat...and we will all keep our fingers crossed for you that it works out well...Good luck!
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Posts
    217

    Cool

    Clean it, coat it and use it. We're all a little too paranoid sometimes.....
    Yeah, like how many miles of galvanized pipe is there between your faucet and the water company not to mention all the galvanized pipe in older homes. Drink up!
    Bee just and just bee

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