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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    holly, mi
    Posts
    2

    Default extractor advice

    Hello,
    I'm new to this forum and a 1st year beek, I have 2 hives doing very well.
    I've been looking at extractors and I'm having trouble making a decision.
    The online bee suppliers have a wide assortment as you know. I don't want to spend more than 400.00 on one and it makes sense to get a radial one.

    Having never used one ... is it a big deal turning the frames as in the basket style ones and manual cranking or is it pretty much about time savings.

    You just can't tell what kind of quality they have from a picture.
    I would hate to get some cheaply made unit w/plastic everything.
    I saw some that have a separate pan underneath and a strainer between them.
    That makes sense to me also, but I sure would like to hear from some of you that have used different types and which is preferred.

    any advice what to stay away from?

    Thanks,
    Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    Millers has a 4 frame extractor for 245.00 Item M600

    http://millerbeesupply.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    I would be wary of the plastic gears. Look for a nice used one. E-bay sometimes has them or advertise in the section here on Bee Source.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default Here is a good looking one for sale.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    ... is it a big deal turning the frames as in the basket style ones and manual cranking or is it pretty much about time savings.
    I recently asked this part of your question here. You might want to check it out:

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=220706

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Default

    BeeGood,

    I use a manual 1930s basket style extractor that weighs a ton. It has large metal gears, but works great. I painted it with several coats of food-grade epoxy and sealed it well. With two hives, you will find something like my extractor would work fine. I have three hives. It is not a big deal to spin four frames; then stop, reverse them, and spin again. Yes, a larger radial extractor, maybe even with a motor, would greatly speed up the process, but the cost is exorbitant and both of us are at the small hobbyist level. Actually, I enjoy spending the day extracting. The real pain to me is the uncapping. That takes the most time. I funnel the honey straight from the extractor through a double bucket-top filter, and bottle it directly from the bottling bucket. If you are not planning on a commercial business, this system will work at the lowest price. If you plan on expanding quickly to a side-line business, you might consider foregoing the fun of manual extracting for a motorized radial extractor.
    Hobbyist

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,139

    Default

    My advice, buy stainless electric. I would think they are in more of a demand and would be easier to sell if you want out of beekeeping. Also, you'll appreciate electric vs hand-cranking if you get more involved.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    central north carolina
    Posts
    56

    Wink plan ahead

    the nine frame with hand crank can be up graded with a motor kit later
    two hives this year, 12 hives next year,, beekeeping fever.........

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,416

    Default

    Short answer, wait. When you have a few years and more hives, then find a good used one. There should be plenty of them up that way. Until then, cut comb or crush and strain.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    "I don't want to spend more than $400.00 on one and it makes sense to get a radial one".--beegood.


    From what I have seen, you would be lucky to find a RADIAL for less than $400.00. Most manufacturers make their radials for more than 3- 4 frames, whatever size and are more expensive than tangential.

    Keep in mind the GAUGE of the metal that is advertized in the making of the extractors. The lower number, 24 for example, is slightly thicker and heavier than gauge 26; by fractions of an ounce and millimeters of course.

    I have the MannLake --HH-190. [$350.00] It is 26 gauge steel, but I am perfectly happy with it. I like the side-handle crank rather than the handle on the top; that may be a consideration. The one with the seperate pan underneath/strainer, I have never used.

    The manual cranking part is 'kind of fun at first' but it gets 'old' pretty fast the more frames/supers you you have to extract. It's GOOD excercise!! With two hives, this shoudn't be a problem.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Short answer, wait. When you have a few years and more hives, then find a good used one. There should be plenty of them up that way. Until then, cut comb or crush and strain.
    I agree with Ross. Get involved with a local bee club, make friends with beeks who own extractors and borrow theirs. I don't own an extractor, but borrowing a number of different ones has allowed me to see first-hand what features I like and dislike.

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