Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Default American Foulbrood?

    I helped a friend with her top bar hive today.
    Apparently the hive was healthy and high in population when she looked in a few weeks ago (though she never went through the hive all the way to the front). Today what I saw was low population, scattered brood pattern and somewhat sunken caps. Many open caps had the remnants of the brood in--looking a bit like chalk brood--dried up and white. When I scrached the surface of the capped brood there was either white goo or next to nothing (dried up) inside. I did not try stringing the goo, as I have never encountered AFB and so did not know to do that. But also, there was not a noticeable foul smell (I have smelled the EFB before and that really smells bad). So I wonder if this sounds like any other brood diseases you have heard of?
    Any thoughts appreciated--
    Ruby in Oakland CA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    Send a sample to Beltsville, fast and cheap!

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=7472

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Default

    I would do a string (or rope if you like) test. Before I would panic I'd send samples to Beltsville.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#afb
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    Why is sending samples to Beltsville considered "panicking". I would think that using accurate, inexpensive diagnostics is always the indicated course of action.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Default

    >Why is sending samples to Beltsville considered "panicking".

    It is not. Burning the hive is panicking.

    > I would think that using accurate, inexpensive diagnostics is always the indicated course of action.

    Agreed. The quickest, most inexpensive and fairly reliable test is for ropiness. The most definitive is Beltsville. There is no reason not to do both.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    I was calmer in the ER with a dose of epinephrine going in my arm than I was when I found foulbrood in my hives. "Don't panic" is excellent advice.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads