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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    Here they talk about clipping toes as a method for marking the toads:

    http://www.open.ac.uk/daptf/froglog/FROGLOG_12-2.html

    Sounds like though it's not perfect, that it is the best method for marking them.
    Troy

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
    Posts
    503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beyondthesidewalks View Post
    ...Perhaps strategically placing a dead bug zapper or black light would attract bugs and then toads away from your hives.

    The crazy things I come up with...
    That's not so crazy. When I lived in the lower desert, we would turn on the porch light for cheap entertainment. The toads would arrive a couple minutes later and start feasting on the huge moths. They learned to hop over and wait whenever that light went on...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,347

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the great feedback. Last night I spent even more time rounding up toads than I had the night before. This time I collected approximately sixty of the little varmints and moved them about five miles downhill from my location. After I returned I carefully checked for those I missed, and only found three. This morning the count was still at three. Hopefully tonights relocation trip may be my last for awhile.

    Laws concerned with wild game management never seem to have anticipated my situation:
    -- These toads secretions contain a drug that is a Schedule I controlled substance (so the D.E.A. is watching - so to speak).
    -- I discovered someone on the internet selling these toads for good money. Before I knew there were laws against selling these toads or moving them across state lines, he offered us $1,000 for one hundred toads and he would come to get them. [$1,000 would sure help to pay the bills, but alas, going to jail for the sake of $1,000 was not a good return on investment.]
    -- The law also says you are only allowed to posses ten toads, and then only if you have a valid state fishing license (which I do). [I guess I could be in trouble for relocating the toads more than ten at a time.] What's a besieged beekeeper to do?

    - - - - -

    I appreciate having the toads around to help control garden pests, but they go too far when then start attacking my bees.

    I already use a bug zapper, I collect insects with it, dry them, grind them to a powder and feed them to my Carnivorous Plants (not kidding). I hardly collect enough insects each season to supply my plants, I can't afford to sacrifice any to the toads.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
    Posts
    5,125

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    Sounds like you have a regular jungle in the AZ. That is crazy how many toads you got. I was reading on wikipedia and google searches about those toads this morning. I think I remember seeing that your area has heavy rains in late June to early July. I might be wrong about that. But. If you do. I think once the creeks, holes, ect... dry up good. There should not be as many. They will move on to a more stable water source.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Toadkeepers

    You know how you get goofy when not enough sleep...one night my ass't & I started fantasizing how much easier it would be to be TOADKEEPERS:, moving at night, how many?..." thousands, man, thousands", big time..., debug contracts, no spray, prompt delivery & removal...

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,347

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    That's one of the issues that makes these toads so very curious, they start coming out even before the Summer rains begin, they stay out until the Autumn chill begins, even if there are no rains.

    Even with copious rains there never are any running streams, all running water generally ceases a few hours after the rains stop, no ponds or other bodies of water, either. There are a few areas where water collects in small puddles (the largest of these are approximately fifteen feet across), they usually dry up within a few days and are generally dry between infrequent rains. Though locally intense scattered storms frequently pass through our area during the Summer storm season, they rarely cover much contiguous area. In the recent past there were three consecutive seasons where the Summer rains never fell within ten miles of us, and last year so little rain fell in our entire region that the bees were starving by December.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,347

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    You know how you get goofy when not enough sleep...one night my ass't & I started fantasizing how much easier it would be to be TOADKEEPERS:, moving at night, how many?..." thousands, man, thousands", big time..., debug contracts, no spray, prompt delivery & removal...
    Yep, those toads can sure pack away the insects. If only they could be trained to eat only certain insects and leave our bees alone. But alas, they are too darn omnivorous. Not as good a herd animal as some of the ruminants, either. Reminds me of some of the pesticides used in agriculture and horticulture in their impact on honeybees. But I do see the point of herding them through the fields after dark - just don't herd them near the beehives.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 08-06-2008 at 10:08 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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