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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile Universal covers/ 2 purpose covers.

    Just a thought,

    A feed rim and a flat migratory cover.
    One side is the feed rim and the other side is for the patties.

    The feed rim side has 3/4" plywood on both ends and a 2" wide plywood side for stability.
    Just flip the cover for it's intended use.
    August -September use the feed rim side down so that it encloses the patties.
    Later on when you want to feed between the brood chambers you can flip the cover over and have the flat side down.
    Comments are needed.
    I will make a prototype to see what problems occur.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Post a pic so I have a better idea of what your talking about. I am a "visual" person. However the idea sounds feasible.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Rim side up might collect rain/snow and rot the wood?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    It's doable, just need to think about the runoff. I know my son and I built some of these a couple of years ago and he has classified my migratory tops now in different categories one of which includes the description " The pond lid" even though officially it does not hold water!

    Work on your idea, come up with a design, build a few for yourself and then make a ton of money selling them! Sounds like a good idea to me.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    well I have just built a few interchangeable tops/bottoms. a portion of the design problem was to allow maximum use of a sheet of plywood.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    Well panther, if you figure it out let me know, I always have leftovers that aren't good for much!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
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    3,604

    Default a portion of the design problem was to allow maximum use of a sheet of plywood.

    The cutting layout of a 4' X 8' sheet will yield 10 blanks plus scrap for two 8 frames.
    Each saw kerf, saw blade width, is 3/16"

    Comments?
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Last edited by BEES4U; 08-05-2008 at 09:05 AM. Reason: updated.
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default alpha6

    I am a "visual" person.
    I understand.
    Take a 16 & 1/4" X 21 & 1/2" or what length your covers are using and place 3/4" X 1.5" x the hive dimentions boards. There you have it.

    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Plywood flats

    When my bees were still on bottom boards I learned that 16" lids tied down without " buckling" or popping up. Important on front row especially. You can hardly tell they're a little shy.

    To avoid falloff waste and unnecessary expense just buy precut flats from Used Pallet Co.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile The feed rims are in production.

    I assembled the first 10 this morning.
    The cover is glued and stapled onto a 3/4' X 1 & 1/2" rim for ease and speed of assembly. A Mann Lake patty fits under the rim with 3/8" crawl space for the bees to consume the patties 24/7 and their syrup pail on top.
    Or, place the 4-6 pound home made patty on the top bars until you have to crack the supers later --ohhhh my aching back.
    Thanks for the help with the cap plug application.
    The rim, with a 1& 1/2" hole, can be flipped over for feeding dry sugar or a patty for weaker hives.
    I should dip them in parrafin for weather proofing.
    An insulation insert can be placed on top of the frames for wintering. A piece of thin sheathing + foam insulation + a cap plug.
    I think that this rim has some potential in hive management.
    feeding with buckets or inside feeders
    Formic acid application--i need to see if the pad fits as it could be snug.
    wintering
    medication
    inspection
    Comments are welcomed!


    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    clayton cal.
    Posts
    199

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile Mite Away Migratory Lids

    Thank you for the web site.
    But, I /we do not use the eastern style of covers.

    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    clayton cal.
    Posts
    199

    Default

    those are not telescopic tops -the only diferance from what you are doing and those is the end (short side)thers has the end made so there is a lip that passes the seam of top and box-just like a regular migratory top -you dont have to make the fancy offset corner joint they use -the ends are the key -and you can use them on the tops you already have-with your rim stock on the sides your top will be the same as you are doing but it will be more complete in the end result -to much work for me but you have gone this far already -study there end desighn and try to picture it with out the offset corner joint -piece of cake -I think they use 2x4 stock and you can do the simple cuts with a table saw-your call RDY-B http://www.miteaway.com/MiteAway_II_..._Lid_Large.pdf
    Last edited by RDY-B; 08-08-2008 at 01:07 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    bee4u writes:
    An insulation insert can be placed on top of the frames for wintering. A piece of thin sheathing + foam insulation + a cap plug.

    tecumseh replies: I would worry that you are building a magnificant home for the small hive beetle.

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