Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SLC, Utah, USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Looking to get into beekeeping in Utah

    and we would like some advice on what we can do to prepare.

    I know this is not the time of year to be starting a hive but I'm sure there are things that we could be doing to get ready for next season.

    My wife and I have a little experience with bees from when we were young and would both really like to get into keeping bees as a hobby and for the benefit of our gorden, fruit trees and grapes.

    Suggestions on books to read, equipment we could be aquiring or building (I am a carpenter, so I have the tools and experience working with wood). If there are any local groups or clubs, information on them would also be appreciated.

    Also, if there is any chance of getting ahold of an established hive, information on where I might find one and what I would need to know about relocated hives would be helpful.

    Kind regards,
    Bayaba

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Now is a great time to start preparing for next year. There are several good books to get started with, "beekeeping for dummies" and "Beekeeping a Practical Guide" are two that are pretty good. There are numerous sources to get basic beekeeping equipment if you just google "Beekeeping equipment" for sale. You can also build your hives and supers over the winter and be ready for the springs. Here is a link for lots of plans.

    http://www.beesource.com/plans/index.htm

    Lastly, if you can't find a local beek to get a nuc of an established hive from you can google "packaged bees for sale" and it will give you lots of hits. It will be too late for this year, but most sites are taking orders for next year.

    Hope this helps...good luck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Get involved with the local beekeeping club. Clubs are great places to find mentors, get connected with other local beeks, and learn all the "local" beekeeping practices:
    http://www.wasatchbeekeepers.com/

    http://www.wasatchbee.blogspot.com/

    The State beekeeping organization also has it's yearly convention in SLC, so that'll be convenient for you:
    http://www.utahbeekeepers.org/index.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Luzerne County, Plains, PA, USA
    Posts
    162

    Default

    I am just now getting started myself, yes a bit late, but i know me, and there's no way i could wait till spring .

    Beekeeping for Dummies is an excellent book, i have read it cover to cover once, and i'm well on my way through it the 2nd time. ( Can never learn too much).

    Also Michael Bush's site http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm is a wealth of information, i have spent as much time there(if not more) as i have reading the Dummies manual.

    I willl be using my winter time to build some medium boxes and frames as well (the wood is free so why not ). Might even try my hand at an extractor (plans here on Beesource).

    Good luck with your girls, i'm sure we're both in for quite an interesting 1st season.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Kanosh,Utah
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Jones Bees 2586 w 500 s SLC, 801 973 8281 can give you a list of local clubs. They also have a good selection of equipment. They have been inthe bee business for over 40 yrs and can give a lot of information on keeping bees in the Salt Lake valley.

    Blessed Bee
    Doug
    May the Great Spirit watch over you as long as the grass grows and the water flows.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,207

    Default

    I second checking out Michael Bush's website. If I had read his website before I started with my first hive, I would have done everything differently!

    My next suggestion is to spend lots of time reading posts on this website. Beekeepers don't have much to do during the winter (regarding keeping bees of course!) so I notice an influx of posting on the boards during late fall through early spring. You can really get a grasp on all of the beekeeping issues a beek is sure to encounter during your time working with bees.

    If you can build your own equipment, I would suggest doing that. There is a section on this site for "build it yourself" downloadable instructions. One of the best pieces of advice I can give is always keep spare equipment around. You never know when you'll need it!

    Have fun!
    Let's BEE friends

  7. #7

    Default

    You can get a great hardback book on Ebay for a reasonable cost called The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture, by AI Root. It's organized like a dictionary, which is helpful for finding information. Some of it is outdated but it's a wonderful classic book on beekeeping.

    I think it would also be helpful to obtain a book or phamplet on honey plants in Utah and their bloom dates. That will help you to know when the bees are experiencing a dearth of nectar and give a window for treatment of pests if needed during that time. Some of the other books mentioned are also good ones.

    Basically beekeeping is a hobby that follows the seasons, with chores to do each season.
    Read and learn what these chores/responsibilities are and manage your bees accordingly.

    Best of luck with your new hobby!
    Try to learn something new every day and give thanks for all your blessings.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SLC, Utah, USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Thanks

    Thank you all for your replies. I've started reading Beek for Dummies and have looked over some of the links you've provided.

    My next question would be; how many hives (I don't want to get carried away just starting of, so probably just 1 or 2) and how many boxes should I plan on needing for each?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    the first book I would suggest would be the abc-xyz of beekeeping (sometime called the bible of beekeeping) reprinted many time and should be available used.

    three hives is a good number to begin with (one dud, one average and one excellent hive). more than one give you the opportunity to move resources from one (the boomer) to a hive that is struggling.

    the fall and winter are the tradional time for building equipment and preparing for the spring.

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