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Thread: Weather change

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lavaca county, Texas
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    487

    Weather change

    After several months of virtual drought -- a couple of showers that left less than 1/8" -- we got rain via Dolly. 2 3/4" of rain, actually.

    I have already seen "rain lilies" start popping up. I think a few other things may reappear here and there, adding a few blooms.

    I am curious if this will bring on {or slow down?} a wave of pests and critters, as well. Should I be extra vigilant about wax moths, SHB, etc.? Or will the rain slow them down?

    I notice the fire ants got busy and started excavations, as did the gophers. Crickets have appeared, and I've seen toads for the first time in a few weeks. Just trying to stay ahead of the curve.

    Summer

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

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    arrgggg.... we got nada here. still extremely dry.

    rain seems to make the fire ants multiply (numbers of new mounds). I have never noted any extra problem with wax moth and the increase in fire ant numbers may limit shb numbers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    127

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    Got about 4 tenths at my part of Colorado County. Was hoping for 15 inches but we have had about 1&1/2 inches of stray showers over the past several weeks so I can't complain too much. The cracks in the ground still look like crevaces. Sorry it didn't make it further north. In the six years we have been going out there I am constantly amazed at the plethora of the various insects that are always there or show up periodically. I cannot say I've noticed any correlation of pests of the bees with rain but this is only my second summer with the bees. The SHB showed up at my place last Sept. but have been inactive through the spring & summer except for one or two. The ants & gophers get active with moisture as has been noted. The hogs tend to move in wider areas when the ground gets moist. My wife got charged by a skunk last week during the day. We first thought it might be rabid but we went out that night & saw it with skunk kids whatever they are called. Our past experience with skunks has shown that they are like the Marines, they charge the source of fire instead of retreating from it. I have noticed in the very wet periods that the mosquitoes don't last as long as they do in the city. The multitude of spiders, dragonflies, bats & whatever must be happy. A couple of foxes have recently graced us with their residence in the neighborhood. Don't you just love the country? Now, if we can only find that elusive Chupacabra.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lavaca county, Texas
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    487

    Smile

    Well, the June bugs have taken a huge leap forward. Lots of new fire ant mounds, and gopher mounds. Crickets have increased, but that's normal with moisture.

    The armadillos have been active this year, and the wild hogs. The garden spiders (shiny black green yellow) have been totally non existent this year. But there are lots of the other brown ones around. I actually saw one of those guys fending off a red wasp the other day. Dang.

    I have not noticed <knocking on wood> an increase in SHB or WM. But I have already lost a hive this year to WM, as it's their first year, and weren't strong enough to fight them off. So I'm keeping a close eye on things. I have also gone back and reduced entrance size on a few of the slower hives. Ventilation be darned.

    Now, does anyone know if dove weed has pollen or nectar?


    Summer

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by summer1052 View Post
    Well, the June bugs have taken a huge leap forward. Lots of new fire ant mounds, and gopher mounds. Crickets have increased, but that's normal with moisture.

    The armadillos have been active this year, and the wild hogs. The garden spiders (shiny black green yellow) have been totally non existent this year. But there are lots of the other brown ones around. I actually saw one of those guys fending off a red wasp the other day. Dang.

    I have not noticed <knocking on wood> an increase in SHB or WM. But I have already lost a hive this year to WM, as it's their first year, and weren't strong enough to fight them off. So I'm keeping a close eye on things. I have also gone back and reduced entrance size on a few of the slower hives. Ventilation be darned.

    Now, does anyone know if dove weed has pollen or nectar?


    Summer
    If by dove weed you are referring to one of the crotons (usually woolly croton) that bloom profusely this time of year, then it has both pollen and nectar. The honey from it is completely inedible as it tastes just like the plant smells (which is not appealing, trust me).
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Terrell, Texas, USA
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    281

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    Gene,

    Is the plant the same thing we (I) call "Goat Weed". Has a sagey mixed with vinegar smell. I opened a hive today and it smelled of goat weed. I only thought "I wonder what this will taste like". Going to be fun seperating the Goat Weed honey from everything else.

    Tom

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Cleveland, Texas
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    1,378

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    Tom,

    Yup, sounds like the stuff. I had about 130 lbs of the honey last year, only good for giving back to the bees.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    flyman writes:
    Is the plant the same thing we (I) call "Goat Weed".

    tecumseh replies: yep... folks who are serious about hunting dove will actually plant this common weed.

    given how varied peoples taste in honey is... perhaps goat weed might have possibilities as a variety honey????

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    given how varied peoples taste in honey is... perhaps goat weed might have possibilities as a variety honey????
    Maybe, but everyone I had taste it absolutely hated it, some could not even get past the odor to taste it. I ended up feeding it all back to the bees. It was a lot easier than trying to find a market for it. But if someone wants to try, I can put them onto a really good location to make lots of it. Probably about 6000 acres of nearly solid goat weed.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,599

    Smile But if someone wants to try

    Goat weed should be ideal for summer divides. I am interested in what the plant looks like or it's scientific name.
    I am interested. But, it's a long way from home.
    Regards,
    Ernie Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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