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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    oneida ny usa
    Posts
    128

    Default hurricane hive control

    Just curious what you people in hurricane areas do when a storm is coming to secure down hives. Do you add more weight to the top or tie down to the ground?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    140

    Default

    Good question. Unfortunately for the bees, they are probably not on the list for last minute hurricane preparation. There's too many other things to prepare for that would take priority in the short time available. Even if you planned way ahead for such an event for the bees, they might survive tropical storm winds but once hurricane force winds occurred, forget it IMHO. In the aftermath, drinking water becomes the first survival crisis. Gasoline becomes as valuable as gold, and Katrina & Rita taught us to make sure you have plenty of ammo to defend the other items.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Why heck: I am ready and don't even live in that kind of place:}:}

    I have trailor tie-downs on two sides drilled into the soil full lenth and have a strap across the hive all the time if I want to get into a hive just undo the strap and I am in:}:} we do get some bad wind here an there:}:}
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    140

    Default

    sorry about the double post can't figure out how to delete it.
    Last edited by John D.; 07-25-2008 at 09:16 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    140

    Default

    Good question. Unfortunately for the bees, they are probably not on the list for last minute hurricane preparation. There's too many other things to prepare for that would take priority in the short time available. Even if you planned way ahead for such an event for the bees, they might survive tropical storm winds but once hurricane force winds occurred, forget it IMHO. In the aftermath, drinking water becomes the first survival crisis. Gasoline becomes as valuable as gold, and Katrina taught us to make sure you have plenty of ammo.
    Last edited by John D.; 07-25-2008 at 09:15 PM. Reason: delete

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Crescent City, FL USA
    Posts
    76

    Default

    I just put a couple extra cinder blocks on top of each hive during hurricane season and then hope for the best. When it rolls in I work at getting my family to safety and hope the girls make it threw ok. So far I have had trees up rooted and the roof pulled up but have not lost a hive yet........ knock on woodenware

    Richard
    6 Hives
    Crescent City, FL

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Clear Lake, WI / Sebring, FL
    Posts
    627

    Default

    I take the supers off and nail the lids down . Make sure they wont get flooded and move them inland away from the coast. My bees have been thru a few hurricanes Ive lost very few hives due to wind damage. I just keep hoping I lose my roof on the honey house so I can get a new one.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    morehead city, nc, usa
    Posts
    378

    Default

    I use tent stakes and clothesline cord to tie the hives down. My hives are in a wooded area and I worry more about falling limbs.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingsland Georgia
    Posts
    314

    Default Hurricane hives

    I live in a costal county in Ga. One bee yard is located 5 miles from the ocean. I'm not concerned about flooding in this yard, only wind. This yard is one I have use for several years. The 8 hives are sitting on a concrete foundation 2 1/2 feet wide. On the ends I had large eye bolts placed in the concrete. I have a heavy duty strap that goes across the top and 2x6's that can be placed in the front and back. It has worked well the only two times I used it due to tropical storm winds. A few bee keepers in the area trailer there hives for this reason. But they are actually in the bussiness full time and have much more to loss.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    mr mansell writes:
    I take the supers off and nail the lids down .

    tecumseh adds: we do experience hurricanes here from time to time and we have the add excitement of other high wind events almost year round.

    I find removing the height from a hive to be extremely important. on one or two occasions when we have had tornado type winds, unless the lids are nail down properly they sometimes get sucked right off the hive.

    even when wind topples a hive (or when a lid is blown off) these result in little long term damage to a hive when remedied fairly quickly. the same cannot be said for rising flood water that convers a significant portion of the hive.

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