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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,947

    Default You know the flow is over when

    Your bees are suddenly very interested in the stack of honey supers in the garage. [And they seem to have forgotten that they cleaned them out following extraction last fall.]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    But why would a flow have come and gone without those supers
    stacked in the garage, each with drawn comb, having been deployed?

    There's a direct connection between how much drawn comb one
    gives a strong hive and how much honey they make. More comb
    allows more nectar to be spread out in droplets for evaporation,
    and generally results in much faster filling of more supers with
    more honey.

    Next time, seriously consider stacking everything you have on
    every hive you have, as early as weather allows. You'd be
    surprised.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,953

    Thumbs down

    [QUOTE=Jim Fischer;
    There's a direct connection between how much drawn comb one
    gives a strong hive and how much honey they make. More comb
    allows more nectar to be spread out in droplets for evaporation,
    and generally results in much faster filling of more supers with
    more honey.[/QUOTE]

    That could be a local thing where flows come on short and hard. Our flow is long and slow. I regularly make bigger crops packed into full supers putting them on one by one, than my buddy who puts on a big stack. His crop is smaller and he handles a lot of half filled supers.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    546

    Default

    I keep my hives 30 miles away. I am here at home and needed to drive a few nails in my newly installed fence. (I keep my "bee box" with tools, smoker,etc in the back of my Blazer). I opened the back hatch on my Blazer, grab my hammer and a few nails from my bee box, go do the fence repair, took about 15 minutes. When I get back to the car, there are 5 - 6 bees in the car at my bee box. Thats a dearth! They are ferel, as I'm in the city and I know nobody keeps bees in this subdivision...
    Find A Beekeeper - Swarm List
    "There's nothing wrong with me, it's the rest of the world that has a problem"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,207

    Default

    Andrew, are you seeing golden rod in your area yet? It's really coming out quickly down here. The dearth should be over soon! We didn't really have a dearth at my house!
    Let's BEE friends

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fischer View Post
    Next time, seriously consider stacking everything you have on
    every hive you have, as early as weather allows. You'd be
    surprised.
    For sure, Jim. As my old friend Buster Smith said..."You never get any honey in supers that are stacked in the barn." Get them on early.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    > Our flow is long and slow.

    That's great! Few people are so lucky.

    > I regularly make bigger crops packed into full supers putting them
    > on one by one, than my buddy who puts on a big stack.
    > His crop is smaller and he handles a lot of half filled supers.

    All I can suggest (and I'd venture to guess that Mike Palmer will
    agree here) is that you try side-by-side tests on your colonies,
    as your friend may have much weaker colonies than yours.

    All things being equal, there is simply no way you can make more
    honey with less comb on the hive. Yes, sometimes the bees will
    not fill it all, but that's still "good" in that you know that they
    did not lack for empty comb space in which to evaporate nectar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,403

    Default

    I don't know about slow flows -vs- fast flows, all I know is that, each season I always seem to be short on honey supers. I keep trying to anticipate how many supers my bees will need to capture the maximum amount of nectar they are capable of harvesting during our Mesquite flow.

    I look forward to next season, so I can, once more, try to have more supers than the bees can fill from the Mesquite honey flow. Every season I convince myself that, this time, I've assembled enough equipment, only to discover that I have again underestimated the quantity of available nectar and my bees ability to harvest it.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,953

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fischer View Post
    > Our flow is long and slow.
    All things being equal, there is simply no way you can make more
    honey with less comb on the hive. Yes, sometimes the bees will
    not fill it all, but that's still "good" in that you know that they
    did not lack for empty comb space in which to evaporate nectar.
    The hives are side by side(for 25 years) and I didn't say "less comb on the hive". I just stack them on one by one or two, rather than a big stack at once. I am try to keep ahead of the flow, and at the end of the season have an empty or partially filled box on top. I end up with a stack as big, or bigger, but fully filled boxes rather than a pile of partials.
    I've said it before, when giving advice keep in mind territorial differences.
    Location, location, location.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,472

    Default

    [QUOTE=Jim Fischer;338477 Yes, sometimes the bees will
    not fill it all, but that's still "good" in that you know that they
    did not lack for empty comb space in which to evaporate nectar.[/QUOTE]

    Exactly. Remember that nectar is 85% water, and honey is 85% sugar. It takes almost two supers of nectar storage space to make one super of honey. If the supers are on the hive, and a flow starts, they have enough room to store what they bring in. If you get to the yard, andf the supers are full, they you've lost production.

    And, if the only place the bees can store this incoming is in the broodnest...because you didn't get there with empty supers, 'cause you didn't need any supers on the hive last time, and you didn't realize how strong this sudden flow was...then the bees hit the trees.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Odfrank,
    Two beekeepers keeping hives next to each other for 25 years. One makes more honey than the other. One has nothing but "pile of partials".

    Don't you guys talk? Are you not friends? Is one not willing to learn from another?

    Why would this guy even keep bees to get nothing more than a pile of partials from his efforts year after year as suggested by you?

    First off, I'd rethink that whole concept of having bees along side another beekeeper who you feel is such an inadequate beekeeper to ignorantly keep bees in such a poor management style, that its worthy of commenting here. I would think you could do better moving your hives out of the same apiary and look for greener pastures. After-all, what else is he doing poorly that could impact your bees?

  12. #12

    Default

    According to a long timer in my area, he said that we are in a derth now and the honey flow is likely over. Not sure if there is going to be another one. But my question is the honey super that is on currently is full however, not capped. So, I just leave it on until it is?

    Nikki

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BjornBee View Post
    Odfrank,
    Two beekeepers keeping hives next to each other for 25 years. One makes more honey than the other. One has nothing but "pile of partials".

    Don't you guys talk? Are you not friends? Is one not willing to learn from another?

    Why would this guy even keep bees to get nothing more than a pile of partials from his efforts year after year as suggested by you?

    First off, I'd rethink that whole concept of having bees along side another beekeeper who you feel is such an inadequate beekeeper to ignorantly keep bees in such a poor management style, that its worthy of commenting here. I would think you could do better moving your hives out of the same apiary and look for greener pastures. After-all, what else is he doing poorly that could impact your bees?

    Well here is my thought on what's a happening with them two:

    the fellow that only has a pile of partials is looking in on his hives more offten and see's lots of full ones, knowing that the hive next to his has nothing in it places them full frames into the other mans hive. That now is a good nabor:}:}
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Smile super

    Quote Originally Posted by 3gooddogs View Post
    According to a long timer in my area, he said that we are in a derth now and the honey flow is likely over. Not sure if there is going to be another one. But my question is the honey super that is on currently is full however, not capped. So, I just leave it on until it is?

    Nikki
    yep leave it on, when its ready they will cap it and if they need it they will move it down for winter. i suggest another super be put on so the can fill it with a possible fall flow or draw comb.
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  15. #15

    Default

    Good thing I already had another super on top of that. It is my understanding that when adding on that super that you should not interleafe these frames (undrawn foundation). Am I correct?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    i'm not sure i get"interleafe" but one or two filled honey frames moved into a box of frames with foundation, and those foundation frames moved down into the full super will help lure them upstairs. when you harvest they can be easily sorted out. good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

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